The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- March 18, 1872
    Jens Olsen (Kaasa)

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for his election. We are not now going to decry the regrettable fact that the Scandinanians as a whole take such a halfhearted, passive attitude in the political life of the city. But we do consider it proper at this time to remind them of their political duty as citizens on election day; and also to remind them that if they neglect to cast their vote for him, Jens Olsen's excellent chances for election may be ruined.

    They should not rest assured that the candidate's fine qualities are in themselves sufficient to lead him to victory. The Norwegian Republicans who are so numerous in Chicago ought to make themselves more felt in the city politics. To be content with one representative (H. L. Hertz) in the city convention is almost ridiculous. Such modesty is entirely out of place in politics.

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, I F 5, IV
  • Chicago Times -- August 13, 1872
    A Scandinavian Rally

    A mass meeting of Scandinavians in favor of Greeley and Brown was held at Aurora Hall on Milwaukee Avenue last evening. It was one of the largest meetings held during the campaign, fully 500 stalwart Norsemen being present and the utmost enthusiasm prevailed. Mr. Lundell was chosen temporary chairman. He accepted the tribute and delivered an eloquent address in his native language which was loudly applauded. In conclusion he read the Cincinnati platform in English.

    On motion a committee of nine, composed of three Swedes, three Scandinavians, and three Danes was chosen to suggest new officers for permanent organization. Sidney Thomas and others spoke, after which the meeting adjourned.

    A mass meeting of Scandinavians in favor of Greeley and Brown was held at Aurora Hall on Milwaukee Avenue last evening. It was one of the largest meetings held during ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1879
    Political Meetings The Scandinavians

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the columns of the aforesaid papers. Many felt incensed, and therefore called a protest meeting. About 120 persons responded. A chorus provided musical entertainment. Peter Backes was named chairman. He criticized the Scandinavian press, which has endeavored to destroy the Republican party in Chicago at a time when the Republican party is making efforts to obtain such a plurality that the South and its ideology would have no chance for survival. The conduct of the Scandinavian press was particularly deplorable, considering that our present municipal administration fired every Swedish and Norwegian office holder. He appealed to the people, to remain forever faithful to the Republican party. We should not be misled by the Swedes because the papers proposed an independent ticket composed of candidates from both parties. It was said the action was taken because 2Scandinavians were not represented on the Republican ticket. Such a demand should have been made at the convention when candidates were nominated. As this was not done, no one would be justified in claiming now that the wishes of the people were ignored. This would be no reason to change the ticket.

    Boyeson was the second speaker. He said that no one should forsake the party just because it failed to comply to an individual's wishes. He, for instance, may have favored free trade, but the Republican party preferred a tariff; but that would be no reason for leaving the party. There were many other questions decidedly more important. This should be considered before changing one's affiliation. Such a case was presented here. The action of the Scandinavian press was inexcusable. There papers did not express the true sentiment of the Scandinavians. He regarded as traitors the Scandinavians who would vote the independent [split] ticket at the coming election. The Democratic party would use every chance to win. The impending county election would be of national significance, as the next presidential election would be influenced thereby. The Democrats should not gain the upper hand as long as the South persisted in its 3threatening attitude, which disregarded the rights of the whites and blacks alike.

    The speaker then explained why no Scandinavians were nominated. It was because so many Scandinavian candidates were offered and their respective constituents refused to support any man other than their own nominee. The Germans and other nationals acted more sensibly. They came to the convention fully organized, and if one of their men had been nominated, he would have been given support by all factions.

    Gilbert Olsen was the third speaker. He attacked the Scandinavian press vigorously and considered it an insolence that these papers intended to foist a ticket on the Scandinavians which the people did not want. But the Scandinavians were not the kind of people who would vote any sort of ticket advocated by the press.

    Mr. Backen was the next speaker. He said that the Scandinavian press offered a 4fusion ticket without having held a political meeting to consider the will of the people. He believed Republicanism was so firmly rooted among the Scandinavians here that none would forsake it. He was of the opinion that, as far as the papers were concerned, in this particular instance the views of the people were not sufficiently considered. But this was not done intentionally.

    By this time, the committee which had been named to draft a resolution had finished its work; the resolution was read to the assembly, which adopted it. The procedure of the Scandinavian press was criticized, and the people were urged to object.

    Finally, Mr. Matson spoke. He said that the Scandinavian editors did not use their heads. It was expedient under the circumstances to oppose the machinations of these newspapermen. It would make a bad impression if the people who were at the Republican convention and adopted the platform should now withdraw.

    The assembly conveyed the impression that the Norwegians would vote unanimously for the Republican ticket.

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, II B 2 d 1, I F 2, I C
  • Skandinaven -- January 31, 1891
    A Man for Mayor

    Above everything else, the great City of Chicago needs a real mayor. Whatever our city may do in the next two years by way of preparation for the World's Fair; whatever adornments this "Lady of the Lake" may wish to put on in order to receive and entertain the nations of the world properly, as her guests, Chicago will be molded by the judgment and guided by the hand of its chief magistrate. Some fair officials are to be chosen. There never was a greater opportunity for the city and for the mayor, and there never was a greater peril in a false move. The exigency is with us and must be met.

    But while consideration of this special exigency may be a good leverage for lifting the burden of misgovernment under which we are groaning and which is arousing the citizens to a new sense of responsibility, it is by no means the only or the sole reason for prompt and decisive action. Every consideration of honor and decency, every desire for the moral and physical well-being of the masses of our vast and growing population, as 2well as a due appreciation of the influence of this great metropolis upon the life of the whole interior of our country politically, socially and industrially, should prompt all citizens to a united effort in rising to the height of our opportunity and responsibility.

    The whole world knows that misgovernment of our cities is the blight and blemish attached to American institutions. We have finally become conscious of it ourselves, for it is daily confessed by our press and periodicals, by our best informed and most thoughtful men. This is a good omen, presaging eventual action. The serious and sober elements will not tolerate this great peril and shame to be treated as a subject for raillery and jest. A remedy must be found and applied. And why should it not be done now? Why should not Chicago add this also to her glory? In her youth and vigor it should have crushed the hundred-headed Hydra of municipal misgovernment and destroyed it before it had poisoned her vitals. Why should not Chicago, this "Queen of the Lakes," in grateful recognition of the honor that has been conferred upon her, and in receiving the crown which the entire country has placed upon her brow, herself add this central jewel to the crown by 3purging herself of her filth and setting a worthy example of municipal reform? Could any aim be loftier? Can any action, any effort be more certain of a reward?

    The task is too great to be achieved at a single stroke, but it can be begun at once. A good beginning is half of the whole undertaking, but a piecemeal, timid beginning is an invitation to failure. This is not the way Chicago is wont to do things in business and industrial undertakings. Why should it not prove itself worthy of its character and reputation in the more essential concern of municipal regeneration as well?

    This is not the field for party politics; Republican, Democratic, Mugwump, Prohibitionist and Socialist--every shade of political faith--is confessedly of one opinion in this most essential matter. They have been so for some time, but when the moment for decisive action arrives, the reformers timidly fold their hands, and the grinding, fatal movements of the political machine are heard in every camp. Shall this be repeated in the year 1891? If not, how must it be avoided?

    4

    It should be avoided by the simple process of choosing a [suitable] man for mayor. He should be a man, not simply a cog in the gearing of a political machine. Chicago can furnish a regiment of such men, who are not representative of the worse, but of the better elements. [We need]a man who cannot afford to sell himself for money or notoriety to a combination of men whose character and occupation is a source of filth; a man who has something to lose when he allies himself with immoral elements and becomes the tool of gamblers and brothel owners. A man, whose strength of purpose and decision of character, when tested, will find support in the sympathy and co-operation of high-minded citizens. This is the beginning and the all essential first step in the upgrade movement. It ought not to be very difficult. It is not necessary to search the back alleys with a lantern for such a man. It is not necessary that his fingers should be covered with the dirt of the workshop or that he should wear silk stockings. Outward appearance, which is often thought necessary to win certain classes of voters, may safely be placed in the background. The simple question to be asked is: Is he a man? Is he a man with permanent interests, who is devoted to the city? Is he a man whose 5capacity for affairs has been tested? Finally, is he a man who cannot afford to desert the standard of good morals and clean goverment, who will reflect credit upon the best character and intelligence of the community and, who, two years hence, can be re-elected and enter the period of the World's Columbian Exposition with experience and with assurance?

    We think that such a man, no matter what his creed is, politically or religiously, will be supported by the majority of our citizens; a majority, with whose support it is safe for such a man to meet any emergency.

    We will not attempt to name the man, but, for the sake of illustration, we will name some men, whom we think, popular judgment will recognize as answering to our postulates. Would not the best interests of the city be safe while the reins of government are in the hands of such men among the Republicans as: John M. Smyth, T. W. Reck, Victor F. Lawson, a Dane, or S. E. Gross, [(the largest real estate and tax shark in the '80's and '90's) -Translator's note]; and among Democrats: E. M. Phelps, John R. Walsh, William D. Kerfoot, A. H. Revell, E. S. Dreier, Max Henius, the latter two 6being of Danish descent.

    The election of aldermen must be placed on the same basis. Reform is as imperative in this field as it is in the executive [branch].

    Let the city take such a step now, with earnestness and unwavering purpose, and it will have fulfilled that condition of success which is necessary in order to pluck the fruit the moment it is ripe. The political bosses might be left at the parting of the ways and the McDonalds and Sullivans, or whatever their names may be, would find themselves out of a job. But the honest citizens would breathe freely again and take heart. Moreover, our streets, which are slippery with mud and reeking with nauseating odors from the business center to every corner would be cleaned. The moral filth, too, would be prevented from flouting itself with brazen effrontery in our thoroughfares. When our million visitors leave us, after the great fair, they will retain pleasant memories instead of disgust and regret. It cannot be repeated too often that correct views on the tariff and silver 7legislation will not restrain the saloon, overturn gambling tables, close the brothels, clean our streets or purify our atmosphere. It is also safe to assume that the foreign elements in our population will offer their support in such a movement in a way that will cheer the hearts of all good citizens. But the movement must be led and led by men of courage and with spirit of self-sacrifice and patriotism.

    Above everything else, the great City of Chicago needs a real mayor. Whatever our city may do in the next two years by way of preparation for the World's Fair; ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, I F 1, I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, I C, I M, IV
  • Skandinaven -- May 10, 1891
    Carter H. Harrison Defeated

    All the Scandinavian wards were for Carter H. Harrison. If other Nationalities had supported him, he would have been elected.

    All the Scandinavian wards were for Carter H. Harrison. If other Nationalities had supported him, he would have been elected.

    Norwegian
    I F 1, I F 4, I F 2
  • Skandinaven -- March 25, 1893
    [Harrison for Mayor]

    The Scandinavians want someone from the west-side for Mayor, a man like Sam Allerton is not fit for the job. People who live on the west-side presume that they too have rights which should be respected. They know that they will receive fair and equitable treatment at the hands of Carter Harrison, but they have precious little confidence in Sam Allerton not that we are inclined to be unreasonable, on the contrary a more patient and long suffering set of people is not to be found anywhere in this broad land. We have suffered wrongs for innumerable years without murmur and have permitted the smallest sections of the city to name the Mayor for several terms in succession. But our patience has reached its limit. We draw the line at Allerton.

    A man who never deigned to put his feet on the west-side until he appeared in these parts as a vote begger and who knows even less about this part of the city than about English grammar, if such a thing be possible, is 2not fit to be Mayor of Chicago. The south-side contains all the millionaires, club nobles, union leaguers, silk stockings, the office-holding coterie, and the grand dinners. The brains and brawn are found on the west-side and the bulk of the vote is cast in the northwestern sections of the city. For once they want a man as a Mayor who knows all about the whole city and who has the courage and ability to run the silk-stockings as well as the thugs. They know Sam Allerton is not that kind of a man, while Harrison is.This is the reason the west-side is going to roll up a tremendous vote for Carter Harrison.

    The Scandinavians want someone from the west-side for Mayor, a man like Sam Allerton is not fit for the job. People who live on the west-side presume that they too ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1
  • Skandinaven -- April 03, 1893
    [An Appeal to Voters]

    Skandinaven repeats that we all know that Carter Harrison will be elected as mayor, but we repeat - do not forget that other men are going to be elected as aldermen, etc. Our advice is to split your vote. Pick the best, cleanest and the most honorable man, regardless of party. Be a good citizen on election day and vote right.

    Skandinaven repeats that we all know that Carter Harrison will be elected as mayor, but we repeat - do not forget that other men are going to be elected as ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1
  • Skandinaven -- November 26, 1893
    [Swift Approved for Mayor]

    The Scandinavian Naturalization Club had a meeting at which it nominated and approved Geo. B. Swift as candidate for mayor. Mr. Swift is a good business man who will run the city for the benefit of the public.

    The Scandinavian Naturalization Club had a meeting at which it nominated and approved Geo. B. Swift as candidate for mayor. Mr. Swift is a good business man who will run ...

    Norwegian
    I F 2, I F 1, I F 2, I F 1, I F 2, I F 1
  • Skandinaven -- February 25, 1894
    [Appeal to Scandinavian Voters]

    The Scandinavian Naturalization Clubs advise all the Scandinavians to vote as a bloc at the next local election. Wards 14, 15, 16, and 17 can be controlled by the Scandinavians. We showed that at the last mayoralty election.

    The meeting will take place at the Scandia Hall next Wednesday evening. We expect a large audience.

    The Scandinavian Naturalization Clubs advise all the Scandinavians to vote as a bloc at the next local election. Wards 14, 15, 16, and 17 can be controlled by the Scandinavians. ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, I F 4, I F 2, III A
  • Skandinaven -- February 02, 1896
    Compliments from the Sage (Editorial)

    Ignatius Donnelly informed the delegates to the Farmers' Alliance Convention that if his paper could be brought out in a Norwegian and Swedish issue, the populists would surely carry the election next fall. A dozen Scandinavian populist editors in Minnesota, more or less, will appreciate this delicate compliment to their ability and influence. Their journals, of which there are at least six professing the creed in full, were in the field long before the first issue of Donnelly's paper appeared. But the sage evidently considers their work as being of no significance whatever. This matter is a family affair, however, and it may be left to Mr. Donnelly and his Scandinavian brethren of the quill to be settled among themselves as best they can.

    Whether the Scandinavians will appreciate the compliment paid to them by Mr. Donnelly in his statement, is somewhat doubtful. The essence of his assertion 2was that they are not populists because he cannot reach them; that they would join the populists in great numbers if he could talk to them through the Scandinavian issues of his paper. The sage has been somewhat quiet of late. It is, therefore, all the more refreshing to learn that his proverbial modesty has lost none of its old time charm. But his fatherly concern for the Scandinavians is likely to remain unappreciated. To be classed as voting cattle is not to their liking, nor do they relish Mr. Donnelly's assumption concerning their intelligence and votes. If he doubts this statement, he would better put the matter to an actual test by publishing Norwegian and Swedish issues of his paper.

    Ignatius Donnelly informed the delegates to the Farmers' Alliance Convention that if his paper could be brought out in a Norwegian and Swedish issue, the populists would surely carry the ...

    Norwegian
    III B 4, II B 2 d 1, I F 1, I C