The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- December 20, 1871
    Pastor C.J.P.Peterson's Answer to the Sufferers of the Big Fire

    Shortly after the fire, when we were obliged to shelter the sufferers in our church and school rooms, one of the American officials complimented the Norwegians. He said that the Norwegian was always very grateful for whatever he received in clothing or food and that he never criticized the different articles of clothing or food and never demanded anything from the government. Let us be proud of this remark and let us live up to it.

    I must give the superintendent for the second district all the praise I can for being so honest in his work of distribution of relief. It is too bad that Mr. M. F. Rockwell was moved to headquarters by request of the Germans; they were dissatisfied with his way of handling his office, stating that the Germans were discriminated against and were treated shabbily.

    2

    One thing we demanded was a Norwegian speaking investigator as the Americans could not always be understood by and of the newcomers and for this we owe thanks again to Mr. Rockwell.

    I would like to repeat: pray, that we Scandinavians shall do all in our power to maintain our reputation and that we shall always show gratitude for that which we received.

    Shortly after the fire, when we were obliged to shelter the sufferers in our church and school rooms, one of the American officials complimented the Norwegians. He said that the ...

    Norwegian
    II D 10, I C
  • Skandinaven -- April 18, 1872
    Jewish Mission Meet

    The Norwegian Lutheran Jewish Mission's Ladies Society will have its quarterly meeting in Zian's Church at Patomac and Artesian Avenues on Sunday afternoon, the 21st of April at 3 P.M. The Pastors, H. A. Hanson, Geo. T. Rygh, J. J. Skarpness, and O. K. Espeseth will deliver the speeches.

    The Norwegian Lutheran Jewish Mission's Ladies Society will have its quarterly meeting in Zian's Church at Patomac and Artesian Avenues on Sunday afternoon, the 21st of April at 3 P.M. ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I C
  • Skandinaven -- October 23, 1872
    Demand Felt for Norwegian Girls School

    Let us all get together and get the thing started. It can be done and we are certain that many parents will endorse it.

    Let us all get together and get the thing started. It can be done and we are certain that many parents will endorse it.

    Norwegian
    I A 1 a, I C, II B 2 f
  • Chicago Tribune -- November 01, 1877
    An Indignant Norwegian

    To the Editor of the Tribune: Chicago, Oct. 31. Sir: I do not think that it can be true that the Democratic Committee has taken our countryman, Mr. Riechel, off of the Democratic ticket and put on a person by the name of Kavanaugh, to satisfy a lot of working men who have no votes. Mr. Riechel is the only representative of the great Scandinavian element who has been put upon any ticket. We think that, after he was fairly nominated, he should remain where he was, and not be interfered with.

    To the Editor of the Tribune: Chicago, Oct. 31. Sir: I do not think that it can be true that the Democratic Committee has taken our countryman, Mr. Riechel, off ...

    Norwegian
    I F 4, I C
  • Skandinaven -- February 25, 1879
    Limitation of Immigration from China (Editorial)

    Some time ago the House Representatives passed a bill, the chief provision of which was to forbid the captain of any ship arriving in the port of a State which restricts immigration to have aboard more than fifteen Chinese immigrants. A few days later this bill was also passed by the Senate, the only amendment being that Chinese diplomatic representatives and persons planning to stay in this country for only a short period of time for educational purposes shall be exempted from the provisions of the bill. The House will probably pass the bill in its amended form, and if so, only the President's signature is required to make it the law of the land.

    The question has been subjected to heated discussion in the American press. The idea of discriminating against any particular race is something new in this country, and some people see in it a manifestation of the "Know-Nothing" 2movement which was so widespread some twenty-five years ago.

    An influential, not numerous, group see in unrestricted Chinese immigration the means of keeping wages at a low level, and undoubtedly, in the opinion of many Americans, this is the all-important factor to consider in regard to the Chinese question.

    Undeniably, it sounds well to proclaim to the world that our country is a refuge and a haven for any race or class under the sun, but when this kind of philantrophic sentiment is tested in the laboratory of practical life, many unforeseen difficulties are encountered.

    The opposition to Chinese immigration is greatest in those localities where the native population comes in closest contact with the Mongols, and its intensity is inversely proportional to the distance.

    The Chinese cling with great tenacity to inherited customs, traditions, and 3prejudices; they do not mingle well with the rest of our population; they even display a certain contempt for everybody not belonging to the slant-eyed race. They are becoming alarmingly numerous on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, and only reluctantly do they comply with our regulations; they worship their own gods, traffic in women and children, and have small regard for marriage and family life.

    Fearing our laws, they do not openly practice the way of living that they really desire, but their stay in this country does not weaken their oriental tendencies, and if they think that they can get away with it, they trade in human lives and commit other nefarious crimes particularly abhorrent to Americans. Experience has taught us that in communities where they have settled in considerable numbers and gained a solid foothold the social order has become disrupted, and the sense of decency blunted, and a general degeneration and lowering of moral standards have ensued. Under such circumstances it is desirable to pass laws preventing too heavy an influx of Chinese.

    4

    To be sure, the great reduction of wages on the Pacific coast caused by Chinese immigration has been very profitable for a few capitalists and industrialists, but it is generally agreed that this immigration as a whole [is evil in its effect], and it is therefore the simple duty of the Congress to enact protective measures.

    Some time ago the House Representatives passed a bill, the chief provision of which was to forbid the captain of any ship arriving in the port of a State which ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I H, III G
  • Skandinaven -- May 13, 1879
    The Seamen

    The seamen on Lake Michigan have had a hard time of it in the last few years. They have had to work long hours for small pay. Now because of the propaganda carried on in the columns of this paper, we can report that one dollar and fifty cents has been established as the minimum wage per day.

    The Scandinavian seamen, who by the way, are in the majority, can look forward to better conditions.

    The seamen on Lake Michigan have had a hard time of it in the last few years. They have had to work long hours for small pay. Now because of ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1, I C
  • Skandinaven -- May 27, 1879
    Scandinavian Contributions (Editorial)

    The Scandinavians have contributed much to Chicago culturally and politically. Since the founding of the city, [our people]have held a great number of political offices, both city and county.

    There are seven newspapers in the Scandinavian community, and twelve churches. In business we are well represented, many owning quite large enterprises. In banking we have also been represented, but due to the panic, some of these banks have closed their doors.

    Carl Dreier, the Dane, is connected with the International Bank, and is one of the main stockholders.

    The Scandinavians have contributed much to Chicago culturally and politically. Since the founding of the city, [our people]have held a great number of political offices, both city and county. There ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I F 4, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1879
    Political Meetings The Scandinavians

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the columns of the aforesaid papers. Many felt incensed, and therefore called a protest meeting. About 120 persons responded. A chorus provided musical entertainment. Peter Backes was named chairman. He criticized the Scandinavian press, which has endeavored to destroy the Republican party in Chicago at a time when the Republican party is making efforts to obtain such a plurality that the South and its ideology would have no chance for survival. The conduct of the Scandinavian press was particularly deplorable, considering that our present municipal administration fired every Swedish and Norwegian office holder. He appealed to the people, to remain forever faithful to the Republican party. We should not be misled by the Swedes because the papers proposed an independent ticket composed of candidates from both parties. It was said the action was taken because 2Scandinavians were not represented on the Republican ticket. Such a demand should have been made at the convention when candidates were nominated. As this was not done, no one would be justified in claiming now that the wishes of the people were ignored. This would be no reason to change the ticket.

    Boyeson was the second speaker. He said that no one should forsake the party just because it failed to comply to an individual's wishes. He, for instance, may have favored free trade, but the Republican party preferred a tariff; but that would be no reason for leaving the party. There were many other questions decidedly more important. This should be considered before changing one's affiliation. Such a case was presented here. The action of the Scandinavian press was inexcusable. There papers did not express the true sentiment of the Scandinavians. He regarded as traitors the Scandinavians who would vote the independent [split] ticket at the coming election. The Democratic party would use every chance to win. The impending county election would be of national significance, as the next presidential election would be influenced thereby. The Democrats should not gain the upper hand as long as the South persisted in its 3threatening attitude, which disregarded the rights of the whites and blacks alike.

    The speaker then explained why no Scandinavians were nominated. It was because so many Scandinavian candidates were offered and their respective constituents refused to support any man other than their own nominee. The Germans and other nationals acted more sensibly. They came to the convention fully organized, and if one of their men had been nominated, he would have been given support by all factions.

    Gilbert Olsen was the third speaker. He attacked the Scandinavian press vigorously and considered it an insolence that these papers intended to foist a ticket on the Scandinavians which the people did not want. But the Scandinavians were not the kind of people who would vote any sort of ticket advocated by the press.

    Mr. Backen was the next speaker. He said that the Scandinavian press offered a 4fusion ticket without having held a political meeting to consider the will of the people. He believed Republicanism was so firmly rooted among the Scandinavians here that none would forsake it. He was of the opinion that, as far as the papers were concerned, in this particular instance the views of the people were not sufficiently considered. But this was not done intentionally.

    By this time, the committee which had been named to draft a resolution had finished its work; the resolution was read to the assembly, which adopted it. The procedure of the Scandinavian press was criticized, and the people were urged to object.

    Finally, Mr. Matson spoke. He said that the Scandinavian editors did not use their heads. It was expedient under the circumstances to oppose the machinations of these newspapermen. It would make a bad impression if the people who were at the Republican convention and adopted the platform should now withdraw.

    The assembly conveyed the impression that the Norwegians would vote unanimously for the Republican ticket.

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, II B 2 d 1, I F 2, I C
  • Skandinaven -- March 23, 1883
    Protest

    There has been a great deal of protest because the city wants to change street names.

    The Danes resent the change in the name of "Dania Avenue," and the Norwegians protest the change in "Christiania Avenue."

    We object to this changing of names; if the "Common Council" persists they will find that every one will protest.

    There has been a great deal of protest because the city wants to change street names. The Danes resent the change in the name of "Dania Avenue," and the Norwegians ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I C
  • Skandinaven -- January 25, 1887
    August Spies--Van Zandt Wedding

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County.

    Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late on Tuesday evening, after having declared in the afternoon of the same day that he would interpose no obstacle to the marriage. According to the report, it was the Scandinavian religious influence which caused this change of mind in the Sheriff.

    The statement in regard to the Sheriff's sudden change of mind we think is wholly unfounded, and will hardly be credited to such by anyone who knows Sheriff Matson. Be this, however, as it may, it is the extraordinary fact that the Staats Zeitung accords all the credit for saving 2Chicago and the world from the tragi-comic scandal of a wedding under the gallows to "Scandinavian religious influence" which startles us.

    The Scandinavians are not an irreligious people, and are pleased to have this fact recognized, but that a plain act of common sense and good judgment in the government of Cook County is attributed to this source alone does great injustice to the people of Chicago and the well-known good sense of Mr. Matson. We are not indifferent to the opinion of our German neighbors, and are pleased with a compliment from the Staats-Zeitung, but when that compliment on its very face is insincere and stupid, and, moreover, is intended as a slur on the character of a respected citizen, we decline with thanks.

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County. Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4, I C