The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 25, 1887
    August Spies--Van Zandt Wedding

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County.

    Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late on Tuesday evening, after having declared in the afternoon of the same day that he would interpose no obstacle to the marriage. According to the report, it was the Scandinavian religious influence which caused this change of mind in the Sheriff.

    The statement in regard to the Sheriff's sudden change of mind we think is wholly unfounded, and will hardly be credited to such by anyone who knows Sheriff Matson. Be this, however, as it may, it is the extraordinary fact that the Staats Zeitung accords all the credit for saving 2Chicago and the world from the tragi-comic scandal of a wedding under the gallows to "Scandinavian religious influence" which startles us.

    The Scandinavians are not an irreligious people, and are pleased to have this fact recognized, but that a plain act of common sense and good judgment in the government of Cook County is attributed to this source alone does great injustice to the people of Chicago and the well-known good sense of Mr. Matson. We are not indifferent to the opinion of our German neighbors, and are pleased with a compliment from the Staats-Zeitung, but when that compliment on its very face is insincere and stupid, and, moreover, is intended as a slur on the character of a respected citizen, we decline with thanks.

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County. Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4, I C
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1887
    Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago.

    We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, we will find that the number of bigamists will increase.

    Why were Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies permitted to marry at all? The churches and ministers should object to this.

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago. We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- November 25, 1892
    Professor Boyesen on the Scandinavians (Editorial)

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor Boyesen is supposed to be thoroughly at home in this field, and it is needless to say that the picture he has drawn is in the main true to life. Yet we venture to assert that it fails to do justice either to the painter or the "paintee."

    That Mr. Boyesen should repeat and emphasize the stale slander about Scandinavians at home was a surprise as painful as it was unexpected. There is no excuse whatever for such a glaring misstatement of fact. Whatever may have been true, or not true, in the past of the Scandinavians in this respect, it certainly cannot be maintained that the Scandinavians of today are more addicted to drunkenness than are other peoples, or races, subject to similar conditions of life.

    2

    During the past generation the temperance reformer has found no more promising field than on the Scandinavian peninsula. Nowhere has he attained greater or more substantial results. Excepting the peninsulas of southern Europe there is no country in Europe where the consumption of intoxicating liquors per capita is less than in Norway. Sweden also made rapid and substantial progress in her war on the dram shop. The Danes, like their southern neighbors, are still a people of rather steady drinkers; yet it is a fact that there is comparatively little drunkenness in Denmark.

    The same is true of Scandinavians in this country. In the West and Northwest the most determined and aggressive regiments in the army of temperance warriors have been recruited from among the Scandinavian farmer population of that section. The present High License Law of Minnesota is their work, and they are the leaders in the recent movement for more rigid restrictions. It was the Norwegians who forced prohibition upon North Dakota. In South Dakota, in Iowa, in Nebraska, in Kansas, the Norwegians and Swedes--excepting those dealing in intoxicants--stand firm and united in support of restrictive legislation.

    3

    It is not necessary for the purpose in hand to search for the source of the current belief that the Scandinavians are a race of drunkards. Most of those who hold it are not to blame. They have been misinformed, and do not know any better. But certainly, it could not be otherwise than painfully surprising to find the falsehood repeated in a publication of the high standing of The North American Review over the signature of Professor Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen. Most of the readers of this excellent magazine naturally take it for granted that writers admitted to its pages know what they are talking about. Their statements are generally believed whether true or false. It is sincerely to be regretted that Mr. Boyesen should fail to make better use of his splendid opportunity to cut the roots from a current falsehood.

    Mr. Boyesen's picture of the Scandinavians in the West is rather unattractive. If it is true, he cannot be blamed for that. But we think the general verdict will be that it is incomplete and misleading. He exaggerates the mutual jealousy alleged to exist between the three Scandinavian Nationalities. In proof of this assertion it is sufficient to point to the outcome of the recent election in Minnesota. He is unjust to the Norwegian Lutheran clergy. There 4may be, and probably are, mossbacks among them as well as in all other walks of life; but it is true that as a class, the ministers of the Norwegian Lutheran Church are opposed to general and national education. Among the students in the colleges and universities of the West, the Scandinavian youth are well represented. Most of these Scandinavian boys and girls are farmers' sons and daughters, who, with their parents' consent, have gone "in search of strange gods," as it is their aim to prepare themselves for a successful business or professional career.

    No hostility to the public schools is found among Scandinavian Lutheran Churches, nor can it be said that they are endeavoring to establish a system of parochial schools, strictly speaking. On the contrary, it is well understood throughout the Northwest that Scandinavian protestantism is a strong and unyielding bulwark of the unsectarian common school system.

    Exception might be taken also to other statements made in Professor Boyesen's paper. But this will do for the present. It might be added that a portion of 5his article containing all the doubtful elements in his picture of "The Scandinavians in the United States" has caught the eye of the exchange editor; and he has already started upon a more or less extensive journey into the columns of the daily and weekly press. Thus disconnected and isolated, this part of the article is a libel upon the Scandinavians as well as upon the author. Professor Boyesen undoubtedly regrets this use of his article as much as we do.

    We have critized frankly Professor Boyesen's statements. But we have no desire to be unjust to him or anybody else. If we have misrepresented his position or views in any way, he is welcome to the use of our columns. We shall also be glad to stand corrected if it be shown that we are mistaken in our views, or have made incorrect statements of facts.

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 2, I B 3 b, I A 1 a, I B 1, III C, I B 4, V B
  • Skandinaven -- March 16, 1894
    [To Close Schools on Good Friday]

    The Board of Education on the advice of our countryman, Mr. Thornton, will close all public schools on Good Friday. Only Mr. Rosenthal was against it, but he was overruled.

    The Board of Education on the advice of our countryman, Mr. Thornton, will close all public schools on Good Friday. Only Mr. Rosenthal was against it, but he was overruled.

    Norwegian
    I A 1 a, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- March 05, 1896
    To Jerusalem

    Far out on Madison Avenue, in a row of small wooden shacks, live eighty people, people who have, in a way, become famous here in Chicago. These people have decided to spend the remaining days of their lives in the Holy Land. At sundown tonight, these shacks will be empty, and only the bare walls will be able to tell of all the prayers that have been said in these rooms the last few years.

    At 8 A.M. today, these people will leave, with a feeling akin to that which filled the crusaders of old, who undertook the long journey to Jerusalem and the Holy Grail. They will go via the Grand Trunk Railway to Philadelphia, where they will board the steamer "Waelslano," which is to take them to Liverpool, continuing from there to Jerusalem.

    The group consists mainly of Chicago people. They have felt that it is their duty to give up their homes and their businesses, and live the rest 2of their days in the place where Christianity was born. This group was first organized some fifteen years ago, when Mrs. Anna Spofford, who was born in Norway, her husband, and ten other people went, for the first time, to Jerusalem. Mr. Spofford died by the walls of the Holy City, whereupon the colony returned to Chicago. Those that went to Jerusalem the first time were: Mrs. Anna Spofford, Miss Grace Spofford, Miss E. H. Spofford, Mrs. Amelia Guld, J. D. Eliahu, and three English people.

    But this time, quite a large group is leaving; nearly all [in the group] are Scandinavians. [A long list of the names of those comprising the group is now given; several Jewish names are to be noted.]

    The members of the first colony called themselves the "Americans". They lived for only one thing: to help everyone that needed help. They tried to live in accordance with the word of the Bible, helping the poor and needy, nursing the sick, and seeking to do good, in the spirit of the Ten Commandments.

    3

    Part of their belief was that good deeds should be kept a secret, and no one should seek recompense for anything one did. The first colony lived near the walls of Jericho, and the new colony will set up its tents in the same place. They sincerely believe that the resurrection of Christ will take place in Jerusalem, and they will await His return there. They will do no work in the Holy Land, but they have the firm conviction that God will care for them in every way.

    They look forward to the day when they will live among the olive trees and the date palms; when they will see the waters of the Jordan; when they will walk with the shepherds as did Joseph of old; when they will visit Bethlehem and Mount Sinai; and when they will listen to the prayers at sunset.

    Their dream will come true. They are on the way; yes, soon they will be "home".

    Far out on Madison Avenue, in a row of small wooden shacks, live eighty people, people who have, in a way, become famous here in Chicago. These people have decided ...

    Norwegian
    III G, III G, III G, I B 4, I B 4, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- April 01, 1900
    The Norwegian Hospital (Editorial)

    A committee has been appointed to revise the statutes of the Tabitha Society. This is an important task weighted with responsibilities. One of the tasks of the committee is to determine and define the principles upon which the Society was founded and the promises made in that connection. The basis for the collection of funds for the establishment of a hospital was the clearly expressed promise that the institution was to be completely neutral in regard to denominational matters. Since the Norwegians are divided into many religious groups, it would not have been possible to bring about co-operation on any other basis. Such was the situation at the time of building the hospital, and conditions have not changed since.

    However, a large number of the Norwegians in Chicago have somehow gained the conviction that the Tabitha Hospital belongs, in a manner, to a certain religious sect. Even the board of directors has given strength to this 2conviction. The attitude of the board has been uncertain and wavering and in several ways in direct contradiction to the unequivocal priniciples and pledges. These facts have prevented the hospital from gaining such general support from our people as it otherwise would have obtained.

    The task and the duty of the committee for revision of the statutes of the Tabitha Society is to correct the situation here referred to. The public expects statutes of a type to make the hospital that which it was intended to be originally; the public expects the hospital to be freed definitely from domination by any church or denomination; that it be made completely neutral so that all Norwegians may be able to feel at home in the institution. If the hospital is to attain this characteristic, there can be no official priest or minister connected with the place and no official hour of worship. Everybody must have the same rights as in his or her own home to seek spiritual advice and consolation according to personal desires. The meetings of the Society ought not to be held in churches, and festivals or fairs held by the Society must be devoid of church influence.

    3

    In this manner the hospital may gain the desired general acclaim of our people. This is a necessary condition for its development and growth.

    The work of the committee is being watched intently by our people, and it is hoped that the confidence and trust placed in the committee will not be betrayed.

    A committee has been appointed to revise the statutes of the Tabitha Society. This is an important task weighted with responsibilities. One of the tasks of the committee is to ...

    Norwegian
    II D 3, III B 2, III C, I B 4, I C
  • Skandinaven -- February 08, 1907
    [Leave for Madagascar]

    From the Norwegian Deaconess Home two sisters, Matte Hagen and Caroline Thompson were called upon to leave for Madagascar to do mission work; Matte as housekeeper and nurse, Caroline as school-teacher. Their destination is the girls asylum at St. Luce Madagascar. Before their departure the two sisters were dedicated and blessed for their holy work among the heathens by Pastor Kald and Pastor H. B. Hildahl. A sign which the deaconeses of the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess' homes always carry with them after taking their holy vow is a cross of silver surrounded by a wreath.

    From the Norwegian Deaconess Home two sisters, Matte Hagen and Caroline Thompson were called upon to leave for Madagascar to do mission work; Matte as housekeeper and nurse, Caroline as ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- June 16, 1907
    E. Burial Societies

    1. White Star Burial Society. Meetings every fourth Tuesday of the month, at Klicka's Hall, 949 W. North Ave. President, Peter Johnson; Vice-President, Maria Malmstrom; Secretary, Emma Pretonius, 821 N. Campbell Ave.

    2. The First Norwegian Men's Burial Society. Meetings every first and third Wednesday in the month in Odd Fellows Hall, 408 Milwaukee Avenue, at 8:00 o'clock P.M. President, A. Mjoen; Vice-President, John Foss; Secretary, L. A.Wernes, 63 W. Huron St.

    3. The Ladies' Burial Society Minde (Remembrance). Meeting every first and third Thursday in the month from 2:00 P. M. to 4:00 P.M., at Wicker Park Hall, 501-507 W.North Ave. President Mrs. Walborg Lund; Vice-President, Mrs. H. Juel; Secretary, Mrs. Anna Bergensen.

    4. The First Scandinavian Ladies' Burial Society of Chicago. Meetings every second and fourth Tuesday of the month in Lagonis Hall,corner North and Western Avenues at 1:00 P.M.

    2

    President, Mrs. Anna Berg, 741 N. Maplewood Avenue; Vice-President, Mrs. Sallie Hevle; Secretary, Mrs. Anna Bergesen, 88 W. Huron St.

    5. The Ladies'Burial Society Scandia. Meeting every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at Nora Hall, corner Green and Ohio Streets. President, Mrs. Marie Blom; Vice-President, Mrs. Marie Nielsen; Secretary, Mrs. Sofie Kraft, 814 N. Irving Ave.

    6. The Burial Society Haabets Anker (Anchor of Hope). Meeting every second Friday in the month in Armitage Hall, corner Albany and Armitage Avenue. President, Mrs. B. Auncy; Vice-President, Mrs. J. Wurschmidt; Secretary, Mr. D. Wurschmidt, 977 Armitage Ave.

    1. White Star Burial Society. Meetings every fourth Tuesday of the month, at Klicka's Hall, 949 W. North Ave. President, Peter Johnson; Vice-President, Maria Malmstrom; Secretary, Emma Pretonius, 821 N. ...

    Norwegian
    II D 1, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- July 01, 1907
    The First Norwegian-American Burial Society

    The Society will install new officers Wednesday evening, in its hall, 408 Milwaukee Ave.

    The business meeting will be followed by a banquet.

    The Society will install new officers Wednesday evening, in its hall, 408 Milwaukee Ave. The business meeting will be followed by a banquet.

    Norwegian
    II D 1, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- July 28, 1907
    [Picnic]

    The Scandinavian sick benefit and burial society, Scandia, will hold its 23rd annual picnic in Kosciusko Grove, Cragin, Sunday August 4. Excellent music, athletics and other entertainment. Coffee and sandwiches will be served.

    The Scandinavian sick benefit and burial society, Scandia, will hold its 23rd annual picnic in Kosciusko Grove, Cragin, Sunday August 4. Excellent music, athletics and other entertainment. Coffee and sandwiches ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 c 3, II D 1, I B 4