The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 25, 1887
    August Spies--Van Zandt Wedding

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County.

    Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late on Tuesday evening, after having declared in the afternoon of the same day that he would interpose no obstacle to the marriage. According to the report, it was the Scandinavian religious influence which caused this change of mind in the Sheriff.

    The statement in regard to the Sheriff's sudden change of mind we think is wholly unfounded, and will hardly be credited to such by anyone who knows Sheriff Matson. Be this, however, as it may, it is the extraordinary fact that the Staats Zeitung accords all the credit for saving 2Chicago and the world from the tragi-comic scandal of a wedding under the gallows to "Scandinavian religious influence" which startles us.

    The Scandinavians are not an irreligious people, and are pleased to have this fact recognized, but that a plain act of common sense and good judgment in the government of Cook County is attributed to this source alone does great injustice to the people of Chicago and the well-known good sense of Mr. Matson. We are not indifferent to the opinion of our German neighbors, and are pleased with a compliment from the Staats-Zeitung, but when that compliment on its very face is insincere and stupid, and, moreover, is intended as a slur on the character of a respected citizen, we decline with thanks.

    A few days ago, Sheriff Matson forbade the wedding of Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt in Cook County. Sheriff Matson reached this decision (to forbid the wedding) only late ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4, I C
  • Skandinaven -- January 26, 1887
    [Intolerance]

    Your article in yesterday's edition of the Scandinaven is the height of intolerance.

    It is to the credit of the wealthy Nina Zandt that she wishes to marry August Spies "in the shadow of the gallows," as you term it.

    I am neither a Socialist or Anarchist, nor do I agree with either party, but I do know that according to the Constitution no one has the authority to stop the marriage, and with all due respect to your Norwegian sheriff, I think it is the height of ignorance, intolerance, and stupidity for him to try to stop the marriage.

    And as for your drivel about Norwegians and Germans, let me say we are Americans, and Americans only. You with your internal strife only retard progress 2and cause racial hatred.

    I know that all decent and right-thinking people are in sympathy with Mr. Spies and Miss Van Zandt, and besides, Mr. Spies has not been proven guilty. It is clear that the entire Haymarket affair was a frame up.

    Your article in yesterday's edition of the Scandinaven is the height of intolerance. It is to the credit of the wealthy Nina Zandt that she wishes to marry August Spies ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I F 6, I C
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1887
    Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago.

    We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, we will find that the number of bigamists will increase.

    Why were Miss Van Zandt and Mr. Spies permitted to marry at all? The churches and ministers should object to this.

    Miss Van Zandt and August Spies were married by proxy a few days ago. We are absolutely against anything of this kind. If people are allowed to marry by proxy, ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I B 4
  • Skandinaven -- December 26, 1892
    A Word to Young People (Letter)

    Editor, Skandinaven

    Dear Sir:

    One of your contributors writes "What greater and nobler cause can we work for than temperance!" I ask, Is there any greater cause to work for? How many homes would be happier, how many lives would be saved, if all would say the same! How often we read in the papers about people committing suicide and murder while in a fit of delirium tremens! The last piece of furniture is taken out of the house, and the best clothes sold, and that money is spent for liquor! To think such things are permitted in a civilized country like America! Oh, such shame to our country. I do not mean to say that it is only in this country. No, it is in most, if not all other countries. It is a puzzle to me why so many people drink that poisonous brew. I do not see any good in it; besides, a man knows before he begins drinking it what will follow. He knows 2it will ruin his life, character, business, home, and everything else. Where he once had a place in good society, he now is found in a saloon or a gambling house. Boy, do not let the first glass fool you; do not touch it. If you do, you are sure to take the second, then the third, and so on, until at last it is too late.

    Now, a word to the girls: Do not marry a man who drinks liquor and do not drink liquor yourselves. Take your health, your honor, and your place in society into consideration. Another thing: do not play cards. That may not be ruinous to the health, but we all know it is to the soul. As many dollars are spent on one evening's gambling, as a person could live on for a long time. Rather buy good books for that money or give it to the poor young friends, do not drop the subject of temperance and books. Let us hear from you again, youngsters.

    Editor, Skandinaven Dear Sir: One of your contributors writes "What greater and nobler cause can we work for than temperance!" I ask, Is there any greater cause to work for? ...

    Norwegian
    I B 1, I B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- February 15, 1898
    A Word on Matrimony

    A perusal of the department for the Scandinavian youth reveals the fact that our young people take much interest in social questions. This is well and should be encouraged as much as possible by parents.

    The greatest of all social questions is that of marriage. The majority of the young people of our commonwealth and of the world enter the state of matrimony to live either an ideal life of happiness and bliss, or to drag out a miserable existence in what might be termed an earthly hell. This being true, the young people cannot be too frequently urged to consider and reconsider the subject which is of so great importance to their future well-being, before it is too late. A vast number of homes all over the land are not as they ought to be, as a glance at the life of many married couples will 2reveal. There we find daily fuss and fume, and much serious trouble. Now, why is this? Is it not because genuine love did not predominate during the engagement, much less after marriage, or because they, previous to their marriage, did not become really acquainted with one another? Certainly.

    The writer has witnessed cases in which so-called shrewd parents brought about a union of their son and daughter for the sake of worldly gain. Resistance may have made itself apparent, but the strong will of the parent soon overcame that. But with what result? An unhappy union, in which the misery and tears greatly eclipsed the financial gain. In other cases the young beauty, fearing that she may become an old maid--which in her opinion is something terrible--will accept the first young man who offers himself, although she does not love him.

    Therefore this advice: Under no circumstances should you enter the matrimonial state when love is not present. Furthermore, do not let your affections 3get the better of your reason. Study the character of your love so as to know all of his or her traits, and if you find things which you think would be unendurable when in daily contact with them, follow the dictates of your reason and do not let your affections lead you blindly into misery. Your thoughts will sooner or later center around someone who possesses the qualities of a more suitable mate, and you will forget your former object of admiration.

    If the young people were more careful in the selection of their life partners, there would be more happy homes in our glorious land.

    It may be said that it is not easy to brave the battle of life singlehanded, but in most cases it is much easier to do so than to sail on the matrimonial sea with one who falls short of the imagined ideal.

    A perusal of the department for the Scandinavian youth reveals the fact that our young people take much interest in social questions. This is well and should be encouraged as ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- September 10, 1898
    Remember the Schoolma'ms (Letter)

    "Editor of Skandinaven.

    "Dear Sir:

    "There has been quite a lot said about nearly every topic of interest to us young people in the young people's department of the Skandinaven; but not one subject has occupied so little attention, though it is of such vital importance to us boys, as the question: What kind of girl should we marry?

    "Now, we find the girls making a lot of noise about tobacco, intoxicating liquor, and the language question. As to the language question, I believe that in our press we should write in Norwegian. As for the other 2two, I believe there is a habit that is worse than either, and which is generally overlooked though it is found quite extensively among the girls. Why not point out their shortcomings too? Surely, they do not consider themselves exempt from criticism.

    "Now let me explain what I am endeavoring to get at. When a boy gets the 'dangerous' notion into his head that he wants to select a 'better half', the first thing that he should think of, if he is an intelligent boy, is a schoolma'm.

    "But if he be narrow-minded, then my advice is, do not attempt to bring one of this kind in, as he is more than apt to meet with disappointment. But, again there are altogether too many of us boys who throw ourselves away by going into partnership with girls who are unable to read and write. I mean the country girls; the city girls are no good, anyway, whether educated or not. The modern schoolma'm should inevitably be given first consideration in making the choice. They are clever, plucky, 3smart, but first and last, they are well-educated, which is the basis of civilization. They have patience to spare, because while working at their vocation, it has been tried and tested every day for months, which is plain to anyone who knows the first thing about a school room.

    "Why should not these precious creatures come first? Why should a smart and bright young man marry ignorance when there are so many schoolma'ms who are candidates? I know a country where there are girls raised at the very doorsteps of schoolhouses who can hardly write their names. A young man using tobacco can find a legitimate cure for the habit, but when it comes to ignorance in the way of neglected education among the girls who have such splendid opportunities in a land where free schools are as numerous as they are necessary, then I, for one, draw the line as far as excuses go.

    "I do not maintain that all boys are well-educated; but I do hold that a boy, with reason, has a right to demand that his 'better half' should 4possess a good school education. Why? The girls of our rural districts have fifty chances to every one the boys have to avail themselves of our schools.

    "With the comparison just mentioned in view, we find, as far as knowledge goes, the balance of credit is in favor of the boy. Talk about tobacco, alcohol, etc. may be all right; but remove the beam out of your own eye first. If you have no education keep still about the Indian weed at least. Do not abuse us poor fellows in scathing language when there is a grave and lamentable defect in your own make-up. I do not use it, still, I believe the limited education predominant among the fair sex throughout the urban parts of our country, is by far the worse of the two.

    Boys, I say again, remember the schoolma'ms when you intend to 'enlist'. You have no use whatever for a girl without education. I know I have not. A schoolma'm is what you want. They will say there are not enough 5to go around; but there is no reason why you should marry ignorance.

    "Now, girls, do not dig up flaws in the make-up of us boys, but look after your own fences first."

    "Editor of Skandinaven. "Dear Sir: "There has been quite a lot said about nearly every topic of interest to us young people in the young people's department of the Skandinaven; ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- September 26, 1898
    Schoolma'ms Beware (Letter)

    "Editor of Skandinaven.

    "Dear Sir:

    "I see there is at least one who appreciates our worth, and I hereby render Mr. Thompson my thanks. Many seem to think that the schoolma'ms are not of much consequence outside of the schoolroom; but let them try us once, and we shall see.

    "Mr. Thompson thinks there is a lack of education among the girls. I think the girls are just as well educated in my part of the world. I do not think there are many girls growing up now, even in the country, who cannot both read and write.

    2

    "Mr. Thompson says that a boy with reason has a right to expect a well-educated wife. But a girl with a good education demands a husband on her own level, and she has a perfect right to. Why should she marry a blockhead? If she should be so unfortunate she will regret it all her life.

    "We schoolma'ms have no use for boys without education. I am glad there are not enough schoolma'ms to go around. Mr. Thompson appreciates our worth; but at the same time he thinks that any boy with reason has a right to demand one of us. Schoolma'ms, beware!

    "I do not think there are very many schoolma'ms who are candidates, because they can make their own living anyway.

    "A Norwegian Schoolma'm."

    "Editor of Skandinaven. "Dear Sir: "I see there is at least one who appreciates our worth, and I hereby render Mr. Thompson my thanks. Many seem to think that the ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I A 1 a
  • Skandinaven -- November 10, 1898
    A Domestic Pleads

    I have read with interest the articles concerning "schoolma'ms," "domestics," etc., but I find the opinions about us domestics are rather poor, as we are not even regarded as proper candidates for matrimony. We are told always to remember that we are stamped with ignorance and therefore must hang our heads and remain in the background to let the more available and desirable schoolma'ms pass by and be elected first; then we may take whoever will stoop so low as to recognize the poor girls that play with pots and pans and live and dwell in darkness. Schoolma'ms, I envy you. My sister schoolma'ms, where are you? Do you read about the schoolma'ms? If so, do you not feel sorry for your servant girl sister who is liable to remain unclaimed and become a cranky old maid? You poor servants, beware!

    So we domestics and dishwashers--for I am such a one--are not capable of grand ideas or lofty ideals? We cannot be noble and true, and our womanhood is as nothing compared with the schoolma'ms and other high intellectuals. Our thoughts are supposed to be with the dishes; they lie dormant 2and inactive and cannot climb and reach the standard of an ideal wife.

    Mr. Thompson, I do not agree with you. Don't be too hard on us! Have we not misery enough soiling our hands with greasy dishes without being told that we are not wanted in the field of matrimony? After all, I can understand it. Who wants a rough-handed worker for a wife, when there are many soft-handed, soft-voiced damsels on the market? But I do think there are many good and true girls among domestics, and many a dishwasher with a good sound mind that thirsts for knowledge. She has a strong desire to learn and achieve something better than the dreary work she has. She would rather sit in a schoolroom and sip the cup of knowledge and grasp it eagerly for it is her heart's sole desire. But she is bound with chains and circumstances hard and cruel. She must trample upon her desire that is consuming her, the desire for knowledge, and give her bright young life as a sacrifice for the ones that need her scanty earnings for which she toils early and late. There are many so placed. Are they not doing a good and noble deed? And if they are capable of good deeds they must also have a good lovable heart, a heart that would make any man happy.

    3

    No, don't be afraid, boys; you will find many an ideal wife among us poor domestics that will make you as happy as a schoolma'm. Let the line not be drawn between us, Mr. Thompson, but place us in a better light than you have up to now.

    I have read with interest the articles concerning "schoolma'ms," "domestics," etc., but I find the opinions about us domestics are rather poor, as we are not even regarded as proper ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- November 28, 1898
    Schoolma'ms and Wives (Article in English)

    Mr. Thompson shows a decided preference for the schoolma'm above any other class of women. Now, unfortunately, I have never possessed the necessary accomplishments for obtaining or holding a position as a teacher, but I fully realize that a teacher occupies a very responsible position in society and that we should always be ready to praise her efforts and give her due honor and consideration. Certainly, none of us feel disposed to criticize Mr. Thompson for praising the work of the schoolma'm; we all entertain similar ideas in greater or lesser degree.

    But what, actually, is the social problem that Mr. Thompson has apparently so successfully solved to his own satisfaction? He is evidently not in search of the ideal schoolma'm, but is, or has been once upon a time, in search of an ideal wife, and he now wishes to impart some of his valuable experience to others.

    2

    I do not wish to cast any discredit upon the profession of the schoolma'm, but I must frankly confess that, in my estimation, Mr. Thompson exhibits a greater amount of cheek and audacity than is usually found among social reformers of his class. He positively declares, "without any mental reservation," that in seeking for an ideal wife, "the schoolma'ms should inevitably be given the first consideration in making a choice." Schoolma'ms frequently get married, and it would not seem strange to anyone that Mr. Thompson should see fit to choose his "ideal" from their ranks; but it does seem strange, indeed, that he utterly ignores the many virtues that are found in women of other callings in life, and even finds occasion to speak of them in a derogatory way, and to dismiss them as ignorant and narrow-minded. We can well imagine how such assertions, entirely unfounded, strike the tender feelings of many a good cook or seamstress who is humbly and faithfully trying to supply those things that may call forth the sunshine of happiness, and cause it to be reflected upon the countenance of everyone around her.

    Mr. Thompson appeals to common sense. I wish to ask him to bring his common sense into play, and to tell us in what respect his favorite class is better 3fitted to maintain a good and happy home than a representative of any of the other classes that he mentions. Now, anyone who possesses just a little common sense and is willing to reason can readily see that there is a vast amount of difference between the home and the schoolroom. The work of the schoolma'm may resemble that of a mother in a few things, but in a great many things of equal weight and importance her work bears no relation to the happiness of the home. Is it not a fact that the work of the domestic, the dressmaker and the dishwasher stands more closely related to the duties of an ideal wife than does the work of anyone else, schoolma'ms not excepted? Not only the success and happiness of the home are dependent upon the work of these three classes, but even the success of a schoolma'm, as she performs her work in the schoolroom, is entirely dependent upon them.

    Then why should Mr. Thompson throw so much discredit upon these classes, and give the schoolma'm all honor for perpetuating the principles laid down by our forefathers? Does he really think that this precious inheritance would long be preserved, if it were not for the faithful and effective work of the domestic, the dressmaker, and the dishwasher? Does he really think that a 4few dry facts, gained through the study of history, literature, and so forth, and stored away in some corner of his ideal schoolma'm's head, are going to aid her in overcoming the various obstacles that she may possibly meet with in a home? Don't build too much upon these things; you may rue it when it is too late.

    Mr. Thompson says that Patrick Henry did not gain much knowledge by looking into the potato kettle. The potato kettle is not everything in a well-regulated home, but a home does not have everything unless it has a well-regulated potato kettle. Patrick Henry possibly did not gain a great amount of knowledge in his home, but he, as well as all of our truly great men, gained something of far greater value, something that forms good clean character, which can only be built up under the influence of a good home. You may praise the knowledge necessary for obtaining a second- or third-class certificate of a schoolma'm, and yet it will always remain an inadequate factor in the maintenance of a successful home. I simply ask you to place your multiplication table and table of logarithms alongside a table of well-prepared and tastefully arranged food, and then let anyone judge which of these will exert the greater influence.

    5

    It is useless to call one's attention to the fact that there are other accomplishments necessary in the formation and maintenance of a happy home than simply the ability to tell who was the first President; there are other duties than simply sharpening lead pencils and whitewashing blackboards. Yet, in the face of these self-evident facts, Mr. Thompson places these many good qualities and praiseworthy accomplishments beyond all consideration, and positively asserts that, in seeking an ideal, the garland of honor should be placed upon the head of a schoolma'm in preference to anyone else.

    Mr. Thompson evidently would think it disgraceful that his ideal should spend any of her time in the kitchen or the dressmaker's shop. Now, does he mean to say that, by reason of his favorite schoolma'm's knowing the particulars concerning the death of Sitting Bull, his bread will be of better quality, his butter possess a finer flavor, or the aroma of his coffee be more inviting, or does he mean to say that these attainments in a home are of no value? I do not mean to infer that it is impossible for a schoolma'm to become a good housekeeper, but we have every reason to believe that in preparing herself for her chosen profession, and later in following it, she will not pay any particular 6attention to domestic cares, and consequently cannot develop much in that direction.

    You talk about the development of the finer senses and the ability to talk intelligently along the various educational lines. But humanity is generally so constituted that these finer qualities are dependent upon one's physical being, and, consequently, in order to nourish these higher thoughts and finer feelings, one's physical wants must be supplied.

    The success and happiness of the human family is dependent upon all classes who pursue an honorable course; it is simply ridiculous for anyone to show contempt for one class and to honor another. The more one thinks of it, the more ridiculous it seems. For an illustration, we will suppose that Mr. Thompson's ideal was not the possessor of these ordinary and valueless accomplishments of the domestic and the dishwasher, as he seems inclined to put it, but instead was the possessor of what in his estimation constitutes a highly cultivated mind that can see and appreciate the beautiful and the sublime. Now, what would be the result if a ten-year-old boy should enter the dining room about 7six o'clock, with the expectation of getting a good supper, and, on finding that the table had not been cleared since their last meal, would enter the parlor and there find his mother deeply absorbed in reading Shakespeare or Dickens? Could she satisfy him by quoting select passages from either of these famous authors, by calling his attention to the Stars and Stripes in some part of the room, or by begging him to notice the glowing sunset and the beautiful colors of the rainbow? Will any of these things satisfy or even please him? No! He will simply cast a hasty glance at things in general, leave the room, and hasten to find one of his comrades, whose mother possibly never possessed the necessary ability to teach school. He will accompany him to his home, enjoy the hospitality there, get a good square meal, and feel satisfied. This is only human nature. When we return to our home after a day's work, possibly tired and hungry, the music of the frying pan and the sight of a well-arranged kitchen seem just as dear to us as the finest selection that may be rendered upon the piano. The latter is good, but the former must come first.

    Mr. Thompson apparently thinks that the term "education" involves only such 8knowledge as may be obtained from books. But education comprises something more than this. Every member of society who faithfully applies himself to the furtherance of a good cause is a truly educated man or woman. All classes are doing work of vital importance, and all are entitled to receive their due honor. It is, therefore, absolutely unreasonable to bestow honor upon one class of society at the expense of another. We will do well to bear in mind always that "Honor and fame from no condition rise", but that these are only a reward for an honest and faithful effort governed by a good intention. In closing, Mr. Thompson, we city girls should have some chance.

    Mr. Thompson shows a decided preference for the schoolma'm above any other class of women. Now, unfortunately, I have never possessed the necessary accomplishments for obtaining or holding a position ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I K
  • Skandinaven -- October 09, 1899
    Our Rights

    Often we have heard the remark from an experienced person. "Better die an old maid than marry a man who you are not sure will be true to you after marriage." Better never to marry than wed someone who would neglect and leave you to the tender mercies of the world. We have seen cases of girls, good, true and lovely, who have left their homes, the homes they love, to take up an abode with the man they love and who they think loves them. In a year or two he tires of her; his life becomes monotonous (as all things will if we do not do something to change them); he no longer sees the beauty in her face. Her hands, perhaps, are not so white as they were the day he married her, and he seeks other company.

    We ask: Can any man expect the women he marries always to stay the same? It cannot be. Beauty will fade, but underneath the outer layer there lies something deeper, the heart, true as steel, as true as the day he married her. Her loving patience, her untiring devotion to the man she loves never fade; they remain the same.

    2

    We cannot for all our life see why some women are so obedient and kind to their husbands, when the latter actually do not deserve it. It puzzles us; it is the depth of love. We know of one instance of a wife who is perfectly lovely. She married the man she loved and to all outward appearances he also loves her, that is, when he is sober. Drink has led him astray. He stays out late at night. He does not think of the wife at home watching and waiting for him. She becomes nervous and worries. "Oh why does he not come?" He whom she calls lord is enjoying himself in company which she would not endure. He arrives home at last. The clock strikes one. She sweetly asks, "Where have you been?" He answers, "Oh, out having a good time." Do you think the average women would endure such action? We think not.

    Physically, woman is weaker than man, but not mentally. She has a right to her own thoughts and actions. We would, I am sure, try very hard to find a remedy for a man like that. Some people say a woman cannot be independent--that she must depend chiefly on the "stronger" sex. We do not think so. She can be independent after marriage as well as before. It is how you start in 3when you marry, that determines how your future life will be. If we follow the beautiful words, "Bear and forbear, love one another, do unto one as ye would the other do unto you", then all would be well. How much nicer to follow the Christian life! How much nicer to see two pulling together in the right path, and how bad to see one pulling the wrong way while the other struggles bravely onward and upward alone.

    But how intolerable to see the wife meekly bow to every word or command the husband may utter, as though she were a slave! I dread to think of it being thus. I would much rather see the other side, the bright and loving side; but we do not always see it. Such cases actually exist.

    Often we have heard the remark from an experienced person. "Better die an old maid than marry a man who you are not sure will be true to you after ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a