The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- April 29, 1878
    [Receive Letter of Thanks]

    The first Norwegian Temperance Club in Chicago received a letter of thanks from Levanger in Norway, for 350 Kroner sent to the sufferers of the fire in Levanger in 1877.

    The first Norwegian Temperance Club in Chicago received a letter of thanks from Levanger in Norway, for 350 Kroner sent to the sufferers of the fire in Levanger in 1877.

    Norwegian
    II D 10, I B 1, III H
  • Skandinaven -- March 04, 1879
    [Politics Again]

    A. M. Wright, the probable Republican candidate for mayor, may personally be a temperance man, but does not wish to inject this question into politics. For some time a temperance organization, called "The Reform Alliance," has been trying to influence the mayoral election, and its representatives have approached Mr. Wright, inquiring how he stands in regard to their cause. He stated definitely that if elected, he would never order the beer-halls and theatres closed on Sundays, since such an act would constitute usurpation of authority and breaking of the mayoral oath.

    It is not likely that the Democrats will fall for the temptation of buying the votes of the temperance organizations by yielding to their demands, and consequently, at the coming election they will stand alone, probably forming their own political party, and voting for their own candidates.

    Such a policy is very dangerous, as evinced by the victory of the People's 2Party, a victory for which the city's respectable citizens are now paying dearly.

    A. M. Wright, the probable Republican candidate for mayor, may personally be a temperance man, but does not wish to inject this question into politics. For some time a temperance ...

    Norwegian
    I F 3, I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- October 31, 1882
    Political Camps Divided

    The burning question of the day is the temperance question. Both the major political camps are divided on this question.

    The Germans are mostly anti-Temperance, and the Scandinavians are divided about fifty-fifty on the question.

    The Scandinavian Republicans seem to be pretty well split. We think that this general division in the ranks of all the national groups will assure many a Scandinavian victory.

    Several prominent men will speak for the anti-Temperance group at Turner Hall tomorrow evening.

    The main speakers in the Danish group will be: Theodor Winholt, Martin 2Rasmussen, A. G. Krogstad, Christian R. Rasmussen, P. P. Holst, and H. S. Paulsen.

    In the Norwegian group the main speakers will be: A. Olledorf, Chas. S. Jewne, Martin Losby, and S. T. Gunderson.

    The burning question of the day is the temperance question. Both the major political camps are divided on this question. The Germans are mostly anti-Temperance, and the Scandinavians are divided ...

    Norwegian
    I F 3, I B 1, IV, I B 1, I F 3, I B 1, I F 3, I B 1, IV
  • Skandinaven -- February 05, 1884
    Temperance

    The conditions here in Chicago, as well as throughout the United States, are terrible when it comes to liquor and vice.

    Much was disclosed at the National Prohibition Convention held in New York. The Temperance movement is gaining headway throughout the Nation, and will be a great factor in the next election. Every day, here in Chicago, one can see drunken men and women, and often children staggering down the street.

    In Chicago, there are too many saloons. We feel that one saloon per thousand inhabitants is more than enough, and even less would be still better. In a town which is growing as fast as Chicago there should be better control along these lines. Saloons should close at midnight, and not be permitted to remain open all night, neither should minors be allowed on the premises. We believe that imprisonment and not fines should be the 2punishment for violation of these laws.

    The houses of prostitution which flourish near saloons, and cater especially to drunks should be closed. Opium dens which have sprung up like mushrooms all over the city also flourish near saloons and brothels.

    Ninety per cent of the murders in Chicago have been committed by persons while drunk. It is the duty of the State to abolish, or at least regulate this vicious trade. This, of course, can only be done if we elect Prohibition party candidates. We should bear this in mind at our next election.

    The recent National Prohibition Convention is the foundation for a broader party, the Prohibition and Home Protection party.

    The conditions here in Chicago, as well as throughout the United States, are terrible when it comes to liquor and vice. Much was disclosed at the National Prohibition Convention held ...

    Norwegian
    I B 1, I B 2, I F 2, I F 3, I H
  • Skandinaven -- February 02, 1889
    A Young Drumkard

    Yesterday, a nine-year-old boy, Richard Miller, was found in an alley completely drunk and nearly frozen, with a half-empty pint of whisky in his pocket.

    This is getting to be a daily occurence especially in the downtown district. We wonder where these minors buy the liquor or who gives it to them.

    The law which passed not so long ago prohibiting the sale of intoxicating beverages should be enforced.

    Yesterday, a nine-year-old boy, Richard Miller, was found in an alley completely drunk and nearly frozen, with a half-empty pint of whisky in his pocket. This is getting to be ...

    Norwegian
    I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- August 20, 1891
    A Movement of Importance to Chicago

    Every legitimate effort for the Christian culture and Americanization of the young people of foreign extraction in our city should meet with the hearty support and encouragement of all good men. Hitherto no movement better calculated to reach this goal has been inaugurated than the mission work now being organized by the United Norwegian Lutheran church of the North West. It may not be generally known that this Church is the result of an effort for the union of the various factions in the Lutheran church which, for many years, has been rent by doctrinal discord. The union of three of these factions was accomplished a year ago, and the United Church is showing a commendable zeal in a wiser and more wholesome work than in dogmatic hairsplitting. This Church now numbers about three hundred ministers and one hundred thousand church members or communicants. Cessation from learned debates has given the church the leisure to look about and it has discovered that its young people are rapidly drifting away from the church and from all religious association. Especially in the great cities are they more likely to be influenced by the saloons than by 2any civilizing and elevating institutions. This demoralization has largely resulted from the dissensions in their church, and the consequent failure to provide adequate places of worship attractive to the young, and an opportunity to study the English language, which is preferred by the young Scandinavians. Fortunately, the Church is now beginning to see the error of its ways, and the United Church, especially, is putting forth vigorous efforts in order to recapture the young people, and throw about them the influences of Christian refinement in the true spirit, and in the free use of the language of their choice, which is the language of the land.

    At the recent annual meeting, liberal appropriations were made for this kind of mission work, and it was decided to make the first and most determined onslaught here in Chicago.

    It may be remarked incidentally that this is not the branch of the Lutheran 3Church which is antagonistic to the American school system, or opposing the laws for compulsory school attendance. The United Church has put itself on record as being heartily in sympathy with American institutions, and it is this spirit which now is at work in the movement here described.

    Here in the city several missions have been established in the outlying districts, as for instance, at South Chicago, Englewood, Moreland, and three or four in the west and northwest divisions of the city.

    But for a work so extended, large funds are needed. Men can be furnished to do the work, but to provide suitable places of worship is not a small matter. Chapels which might be attractive and an ornament to their surroundings should be provided in order to insure the success of the movement. As an aid to this work, a committee of well-known Christian merchants from Iowa, Minnesota, and other states prominent in this Church, are now visiting Chicago, and will lay the matter before business men, especially wholesale merchants, with whom they 4have been accustomed to deal, in the hope that the work will commend itself to their judgment, and elicit their sympathy and aid. We think nothing could be more opportune or more worthy of generous support than this work, and we bespeak for it the kindly consideration of all men who have the moral elevation of all classes of citizens in our great metropolis at heart.

    Every legitimate effort for the Christian culture and Americanization of the young people of foreign extraction in our city should meet with the hearty support and encouragement of all good ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I A 1 a, I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- November 25, 1892
    Professor Boyesen on the Scandinavians (Editorial)

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor Boyesen is supposed to be thoroughly at home in this field, and it is needless to say that the picture he has drawn is in the main true to life. Yet we venture to assert that it fails to do justice either to the painter or the "paintee."

    That Mr. Boyesen should repeat and emphasize the stale slander about Scandinavians at home was a surprise as painful as it was unexpected. There is no excuse whatever for such a glaring misstatement of fact. Whatever may have been true, or not true, in the past of the Scandinavians in this respect, it certainly cannot be maintained that the Scandinavians of today are more addicted to drunkenness than are other peoples, or races, subject to similar conditions of life.

    2

    During the past generation the temperance reformer has found no more promising field than on the Scandinavian peninsula. Nowhere has he attained greater or more substantial results. Excepting the peninsulas of southern Europe there is no country in Europe where the consumption of intoxicating liquors per capita is less than in Norway. Sweden also made rapid and substantial progress in her war on the dram shop. The Danes, like their southern neighbors, are still a people of rather steady drinkers; yet it is a fact that there is comparatively little drunkenness in Denmark.

    The same is true of Scandinavians in this country. In the West and Northwest the most determined and aggressive regiments in the army of temperance warriors have been recruited from among the Scandinavian farmer population of that section. The present High License Law of Minnesota is their work, and they are the leaders in the recent movement for more rigid restrictions. It was the Norwegians who forced prohibition upon North Dakota. In South Dakota, in Iowa, in Nebraska, in Kansas, the Norwegians and Swedes--excepting those dealing in intoxicants--stand firm and united in support of restrictive legislation.

    3

    It is not necessary for the purpose in hand to search for the source of the current belief that the Scandinavians are a race of drunkards. Most of those who hold it are not to blame. They have been misinformed, and do not know any better. But certainly, it could not be otherwise than painfully surprising to find the falsehood repeated in a publication of the high standing of The North American Review over the signature of Professor Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen. Most of the readers of this excellent magazine naturally take it for granted that writers admitted to its pages know what they are talking about. Their statements are generally believed whether true or false. It is sincerely to be regretted that Mr. Boyesen should fail to make better use of his splendid opportunity to cut the roots from a current falsehood.

    Mr. Boyesen's picture of the Scandinavians in the West is rather unattractive. If it is true, he cannot be blamed for that. But we think the general verdict will be that it is incomplete and misleading. He exaggerates the mutual jealousy alleged to exist between the three Scandinavian Nationalities. In proof of this assertion it is sufficient to point to the outcome of the recent election in Minnesota. He is unjust to the Norwegian Lutheran clergy. There 4may be, and probably are, mossbacks among them as well as in all other walks of life; but it is true that as a class, the ministers of the Norwegian Lutheran Church are opposed to general and national education. Among the students in the colleges and universities of the West, the Scandinavian youth are well represented. Most of these Scandinavian boys and girls are farmers' sons and daughters, who, with their parents' consent, have gone "in search of strange gods," as it is their aim to prepare themselves for a successful business or professional career.

    No hostility to the public schools is found among Scandinavian Lutheran Churches, nor can it be said that they are endeavoring to establish a system of parochial schools, strictly speaking. On the contrary, it is well understood throughout the Northwest that Scandinavian protestantism is a strong and unyielding bulwark of the unsectarian common school system.

    Exception might be taken also to other statements made in Professor Boyesen's paper. But this will do for the present. It might be added that a portion of 5his article containing all the doubtful elements in his picture of "The Scandinavians in the United States" has caught the eye of the exchange editor; and he has already started upon a more or less extensive journey into the columns of the daily and weekly press. Thus disconnected and isolated, this part of the article is a libel upon the Scandinavians as well as upon the author. Professor Boyesen undoubtedly regrets this use of his article as much as we do.

    We have critized frankly Professor Boyesen's statements. But we have no desire to be unjust to him or anybody else. If we have misrepresented his position or views in any way, he is welcome to the use of our columns. We shall also be glad to stand corrected if it be shown that we are mistaken in our views, or have made incorrect statements of facts.

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 2, I B 3 b, I A 1 a, I B 1, III C, I B 4, V B
  • Skandinaven -- December 26, 1892
    A Word to Young People (Letter)

    Editor, Skandinaven

    Dear Sir:

    One of your contributors writes "What greater and nobler cause can we work for than temperance!" I ask, Is there any greater cause to work for? How many homes would be happier, how many lives would be saved, if all would say the same! How often we read in the papers about people committing suicide and murder while in a fit of delirium tremens! The last piece of furniture is taken out of the house, and the best clothes sold, and that money is spent for liquor! To think such things are permitted in a civilized country like America! Oh, such shame to our country. I do not mean to say that it is only in this country. No, it is in most, if not all other countries. It is a puzzle to me why so many people drink that poisonous brew. I do not see any good in it; besides, a man knows before he begins drinking it what will follow. He knows 2it will ruin his life, character, business, home, and everything else. Where he once had a place in good society, he now is found in a saloon or a gambling house. Boy, do not let the first glass fool you; do not touch it. If you do, you are sure to take the second, then the third, and so on, until at last it is too late.

    Now, a word to the girls: Do not marry a man who drinks liquor and do not drink liquor yourselves. Take your health, your honor, and your place in society into consideration. Another thing: do not play cards. That may not be ruinous to the health, but we all know it is to the soul. As many dollars are spent on one evening's gambling, as a person could live on for a long time. Rather buy good books for that money or give it to the poor young friends, do not drop the subject of temperance and books. Let us hear from you again, youngsters.

    Editor, Skandinaven Dear Sir: One of your contributors writes "What greater and nobler cause can we work for than temperance!" I ask, Is there any greater cause to work for? ...

    Norwegian
    I B 1, I B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- January 19, 1896
    To Scandinavian Mothers, Wives, and Daughters

    [An appeal to our Scandinavian women by the Women's Christian Temperance Union.]

    As we cannot talk face to face, this article is written in the hope that we may come to a closer understanding and be mutually helpful in our plans for the welfare of our homes and beloved ones--those for whom we are responsible.

    We are continually anxious for their health, good name, and social standing. We rise early and use all our skill to secure the best of everything for them. Often our self-denial for their sake tends to make them selfish.

    Have we given due thought to the influence of this upon our own spirits and our children's characters?

    2

    We say that clean cellars, orderly closets, and neatly wrapped bundles in the store chest are better proofs of good housekeeping than lace-trimmed windows or embroidered pillows. Shall we not be just as searching in the care of the thoughts, words, and habits with which our children live?

    What do they talk about in the playground, when they run errands, or when they go to bed at night? What games please them most? What do they do with their pennies? These are not matters that properly take care of themselves. If the ankles are a little weak, we put on a brace; if the eyes are defective we buy carefully fitted glasses. Shall we neglect the little virtues not yet deeply rooted, or the fickle conscience that has little knowledge and less wisdom?

    Let us consider these things, and counsel together on the ways in which we can best do our work and gain the highest reward of motherhood! Some of us have done so for years. The Women's Christian Temperance Union is 3organized sisterhood and motherhood. No one, so far, who has lost sight of virture, home, or hope, can say that the W. C. T. U. does not hold out a hand to him. No one seeking to help others can fail to find a method in the W. C. T. U's program of work. Our needs are the same as yours; our conditions the same. Let us unite in planning and working with increased strength.

    This paper will reach many who know of the W. C. T. U. meetings through friends and neighbors. This is written to give such people, and all others who may not know of our work, a cordial invitation to attend any W. C. T. U. meeting you may know of; to add your strength to ours, and ours to yours, in all such work in which women may engage, in the service of humanity, home, and country.

    [An appeal to our Scandinavian women by the Women's Christian Temperance Union.] As we cannot talk face to face, this article is written in the hope that we may come ...

    Norwegian
    I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- May 10, 1896
    "The Scandinavian Contingent" (Editorial)

    "The Scandinavian Contingent," a paper by K.C. Babcock in the current issue of the Atlantic Monthly, is a very valuable contribution to contemporary history.

    The author has devoted many years and a vast amount of patient labor to the study of the Scandinavians in America, as well as in their old homes. His opportunities for observation and study in this particular field have been exceptional. He has lived for some nine years in Minneapolis, a city with a large Scandinavian population representing all three branches of the Norse family and making itself felt in all walks of life. As a student and as a teacher of history in the University of Minnesota, he has maintained close relations with a large number of Scandinavian young men and women of the best type. As a citizen of Minnesota he has been in a position to observe 2the Scandinavians in politics; one fourth of the population of Minnesota are of Scandinavian birth or blood, while one fourth of the Scandinavians in the United States are residents of Minnesota. The University of Minnesota at Minneapolis affords the best view to be obtained of the Scandinavians in the United States. Moreover, Mr. Babcock is familiar with the languages and literature of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. He has personally visited a large number of Scandinavian settlements in the northwest, and has extended his investigations and observations to the Scandinavian countries. He is singularly well qualified to discuss "The Scandinavian Contingent" intelligently and instructively, and in his paper in the Atlantic Monthly he has done justice to his subject and to himself alike.

    Mr. Babcock's narrative [style] is easy and steady. He writes as one who knows, and at once gains the confidence of his reader. His picture of the Norseman in America is fair, truthful, and sympathetic. As a citizen, the 3Norseman ranks very high in Mr. Babcock's opinion; yet he is not blind to his racial defects. His characterization of the three Scandinavian types is apt to be impartial. The article concludes as follows:

    "As Swedes, Norwegians and Danes, they fast disappear; merging, not into Scandinavians, but into Americans. They earn their right as such, and are proud of their possession. They readily fit into places among our better classes, and without hammering or chiseling, add strength and stability to our social structure, if not beauty and a high level of culture. Because of their habits of thought, their respect for education, and their conservatism, the difficulties of adjustment to their presence are at a minimum. The Scandinavians will not furnish the great leaders, but they will be in the front rank of those who follow, striving to make the United States strong and prosperous--'a blessing to the common man'. As Americans, they will be builders, not destroyers; safe, not brilliant. Best of all, their greatest service will be as a mighty steadying influence, reinforcing those high qualities which we sometimes call Puritan, sometimes American."

    4

    As has been stated, Mr. Babcock's paper is a very careful piece of literary workmanship. It is singularly free from mistakes; and such inaccuracies as may be found are merely suggestions or incidental remarks. The Norwegians' "distrust of the Irish," to which he refers, is largely confined to a few cities, for example, Chicago where competition for work is apt to run along national lines. In the country districts Norsemen and Irishmen get along peacefully, as neighbors should. The author's reference to statistics on intemperance in the Scandinavian countries would indicate that he is not fully familiar with the great improvement which has taken place in recent years. The consumption of "strong drink" has decreased materially in Sweden and Denmark, while Norway for a number of years has exhibited a smaller consumption of intoxicating beverages per capita than any other country in Europe, excepting the southern peninsulas of that continent. Here in Chicago the Scandinavians are not heavy drinkers, in fact, little drunkenness is noticed.

    5

    In the opinion of the author, "the Scandinavians will not furnish great leaders," of this great people. He may be right, and probably is; their comparative numerical weakness in the country at large, places them at a disadvantage in this respect. But they have produced great leaders in the past and even in our own days. The late John Sverdrup of Norway was a leader of rare genius and power; in England he would have been a Gladstone, in America a James G. Blaine. And in the Northwest the Scandinavians have already furnished leaders of considerable power and influence. Mr. Babcock will, it is believed, admit that the sturdiest and strongest political leader in Minnesota today is a Norwegian.

    Here in Chicago, and in Illinois, we have leaders who are not only popular, but of real importance.

    It may be assumed that Mr. Babcock is preparing a more exhaustive presentation of the subject so admirably outlined in "The Scandinavian Contingent".

    6

    He does speak of the professional men and women of note who live in Chicago and the middle west.

    "The Scandinavian Contingent," a paper by K.C. Babcock in the current issue of the Atlantic Monthly, is a very valuable contribution to contemporary history. The author has devoted many years ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I F 5, III A, III G, I B 1, V B