The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- July 29, 1893
    We Ought to Have a Lithuanian Colony

    One of the most beneficial propositions to our Lithuanians is the establishment of a Lithuanian farm colony.

    There are many Lithuanians in Chicago out of employment, and they cannot get a job. Many Lithuanians are on the edge of starvation and many of them are already starving.

    If there were a Lithuanian farming colony, many unemployed Lithuanians could get help at such a colony.

    It would be beat to organize such a colony of forty Lithuanisan families. Some Lithuanians have a few thousand dollars, but when they have no jobs, their money is going down very fast.

    There is a very good land in Nebraska, the climate is almost like in Lithuania. The land there is cheap.

    If we could organize a colony of forty Lithuanian families, in such a colony they could have churches, schools, and even factories where they could make 2necessary things for themselves.

    This is the best solution of unemployment. About one hundred Lithuanians are coming every day to this country to their friends and relatives. Neither the friends nor relatives can help those who come to them because they are unemployed themselves. It would be best for those new friends who come to this country to be sent to such a Lithuanian Where they could get help until the conditions improve.

    Editor.

    One of the most beneficial propositions to our Lithuanians is the establishment of a Lithuanian farm colony. There are many Lithuanians in Chicago out of employment, and they cannot get ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, I D 2 c
  • Lietuva -- August 12, 1893
    A Second Reminder about the Lithuanian Colony

    In number 29 of Lietuva we wrote about the necessity of a Lithuanian colony in this country. We are writing again because we received many letters asking information about such a plan, how to establish a Lithuanian colony.

    We have a great opportunity to establish a Lithuanian colony because this country is free, we have liberty, no policemen or any other official can interfere or forbid us to buy land or a farm.

    Look at the workingmen's condition in the city of Chicago, thousands of workers are going from factory to factory seeking jobs, and they get the same answer, "No help wanted." These strong and healthy men are starving. How look at the farmers' life; his barn is full of all kinds of animals, his storehouse is full of grains; the farmer has everything he needs - bread and meat; the farmer eats wholesome food and laughs At the city people and says how crazy the city people are.

    The best place for a Lithuanian colony is Nebraska, the land there is very fertile and cheap. Few Lithuanians farmers already living there are glad and proud that they bought farms. Now those Lithuanians do not know what 2starvation is.

    Seven Lithuanian families declared already their readiness to buy land in the Lithuanian colony. As soon as there is enough Lithuanian families to go on with the establishment of a colony, we will find proper place to buy the land.

    Editor

    In number 29 of Lietuva we wrote about the necessity of a Lithuanian colony in this country. We are writing again because we received many letters asking information about such ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, III G
  • Lietuva -- August 26, 1893
    Lithuanians Do Not Slumber

    Five times we wrote about the need of the Lithuanian colony in this country. Six families appealed to us and sent us two dollars for the cost of advertising in American papers to buy a tract of land. Recently we have still another eight Lithuanian families and now we have fourteen families ready to join the colony. As soon as we get twenty Lithuanian families, then we will advertise in American papers for such a tract of land. We will make a close deal. The land must be good, close to railroads, rivers, timber, and in a good climate. Through advertising we will get all information from compatriots and from agents we will get locations, maps, etc.

    We hope that in a few weeks we may be ready to buy a tract of land for the Lithuanian colony.

    Five times we wrote about the need of the Lithuanian colony in this country. Six families appealed to us and sent us two dollars for the cost of advertising in ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, I D 2 b
  • Lietuva -- September 02, 1893
    Lithuanians Are Taking Action

    This week another four Lithuanian families applied for the establishment of a Lithuanian colony. Now we have eighteen Lithuanian families. This week there will be advertised in American newspapers requests for a tract of land. When we receive replies with plans, locations, and prices of lands, we will announce it in Lietuva.

    We are asking for more Lithuanian families to support this important cause to establish a Lithuanian colony. When you have your own land you need not worry about unemployment and food. There will be no starvation. You will do good not only for yourself, but for your brother Lithuanians, who will get help at your colony in times of industrial crisis and unemployment.

    Editor

    This week another four Lithuanian families applied for the establishment of a Lithuanian colony. Now we have eighteen Lithuanian families. This week there will be advertised in American newspapers requests ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, I D 2 c
  • Lietuva -- September 09, 1893
    About the Lithuanian Colony

    Last week we advertised in American papers for a tract of land. Fourteen companies sent us maps from Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota and California.

    We think that Kansas, Nebraska or South Dakota, would be best for our colony because the land in those states is very fertile, close to railroads, large and small rivers, the fields are plain not hilly, and the prices are low.

    The prices in some states are from five to fifteen dollars per acre. In Kansas and South Dakota from seven to eight dollars per acre. Down payment is one dollar per acre, balance on ten year installment plan.

    2

    On October the 10th there will be a railroad excursion, the fare will be paid one half. If you buy land the company will refund your railroad expenses.

    We have twenty families who are willing to join the Lithuanian colony. One, or three, men cannot spend their own money for such a trip. We must raise money for traveling expenses. We have twenty families, let each family donate three dollars for that purpose. Those families must pick up a guide who knows the quality of farm land. Let those men go ahead to investigate and find the best place suitable for the Lithuanian colony.

    We must not delay as the price of farm land will go up.

    Editor.

    Last week we advertised in American papers for a tract of land. Fourteen companies sent us maps from Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota and California. We think that ...

    Lithuanian
    I L
  • Lietuva -- September 16, 1893
    Attention Lithuanians

    September 17th at 3 o'clock in the afternoon there will be a meeting at L. Azukas' Hall, 3301 Auburn avenue. This meeting is called to organize a Lithuanian colony.

    Therefore, brothers, if you want to become good farmers, come to this meeting, where we will discuss our plans, where and how to go to inspect the land. We have in Chicago twelve Lithuanian families who want to join the Lithuanian colony, and eighteen families from other cities. It is the best time now to establish a Lithuanian colony.

    On this meeting we will show maps, will explain the quality of land of each state, and will decide which is the best place to establish a Lithuanian farm colony.

    Lietuva

    September 17th at 3 o'clock in the afternoon there will be a meeting at L. Azukas' Hall, 3301 Auburn avenue. This meeting is called to organize a Lithuanian colony. Therefore, ...

    Lithuanian
    I L
  • Lietuva -- September 23, 1893
    Lithuanian Farm Colonists' Meeting

    The meeting was held on September 17 at 3:00 P. M., 3301 Auburn avenue. Mr. A. Olszewski was elected chairman of the meeting. There were at the meeting three agents of three different companies. The agents had maps of farm lands. They explained the quality of land, the condition of climate, communication, markets, etc.

    The Lithuanians decided that the State of Minnesota is most suitable for Lithuanians, because the climate there is almost like that in Lithuania.

    They decided to establish a Lithuanian colony in the following counties: Jackson, Cottonwood, Lincoln, Lyon, Yellow, Medicine, Kandiyoki, Chippewa and Swift, Minnesota. The price is from $8 to $11 per acre. The down payment is one dollar per acre and the balance on a ten year installment plan. They can buy 40, 80, 120, 160 acres or more.

    There are now 33 Lithuanian families ready to join the Lithuanian colony. At this meeting a committee was elected of John Janksztas, Alexandra Bijanskas, and Casimir Kuncia, to investigate the land, and if the land is good and a suitable climate, markets, and railroad facilities exist, then we will start to buy land to establish a Lithuanian colony.

    At this meeting after a brief discussion, the name for Lithuanian colony was chosen. It will be known as the Lithuanian Farmers' Society of America.

    2

    Every Lithuanian family who wants to join this Lithuanian colony, please send two dollars to cover the expenses of those men who will go to investigate the land. If we buy the land the company will refund railroad expenses.

    In the name of the society,

    A. Olszewski.

    The meeting was held on September 17 at 3:00 P. M., 3301 Auburn avenue. Mr. A. Olszewski was elected chairman of the meeting. There were at the meeting three agents ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, IV
  • Lietuva -- October 21, 1893
    News about the Lithuanian Colony

    The Lithuanian colony farm committee was in Wisconsin to investigate the land. The committee reports that the land there is very poor, white sand and stumps, no timber, but brush. All good land is sold. The committee says, "No wonder the company gives free railroad tickets, because nobody wants to go there." Those companies which have good land do not give free tickets, because they know that they can sell their land without any inducement.

    We advise to Lithuanians to look for land in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota and the eastern part of Nebraska and Kansas. Even there is very hard or impossible to get a tract of land in one place for thirty or more Lithuanian families, because the good land there is bought already.

    Two members of the committee, J. Jauksztas and K. Kuncia, got free tickets to Arkansas, and J. Butkus will go on his own expenses. When they come back they will report about the land in Arkansas. We know there is some good land in Arkansas, but the climate there is too hot, and such a climate is not suitable for Lithuanians. It is very hard to find a suitable place for the Lithuanian colony. It requires lots of money for traveling expenses, and while the committee consists of poor workingmen, they cannot spend their own money for the sake of thirty or more Lithuanian families who are seeking farm land.

    There is also a danger; the companies can bribe the committee. But then every family cannot go to look and investigate the land. It is a hard problem to solve.

    The Lithuanian colony farm committee was in Wisconsin to investigate the land. The committee reports that the land there is very poor, white sand and stumps, no timber, but brush. ...

    Lithuanian
    I L
  • Lietuva -- November 04, 1893
    Committee's Report on Arkans as Land

    The Lithuanian colony committee came back from the state of Arkansas and reported that they were in Prairie County, Hazen township.

    The committee said that the land there was very good, where everything could be raised, except winter crops of wheat and rye. The price of the land there is from four to eight dollars an acre, on easy payments.

    The committee said that they have no objection to the land, but they thought that the climate was too hot for Lithuanians. The committee said: "As to the land, it would be the best place for the Lithuanians."

    If you people do not believe the report of this committee, you can elect another committee to investigate the land in Arkansas.

    Editor.

    The Lithuanian colony committee came back from the state of Arkansas and reported that they were in Prairie County, Hazen township. The committee said that the land there was very ...

    Lithuanian
    I L
  • Lietuva -- November 18, 1893
    Recommends Establishment of a Lithuanian Farm Colony in the State of Arkansas

    We, the committee, are recommending to establish a Lithuanian farm colony in the State of Arkansas, Prairie County.

    We have been in Wisconsin to investigate the land and in Wisconsin we found the land to be very poor.

    We went through Illinois and Missouri states, everywhere we saw the farmers were poor, their buildings were shabby, the live stock miserable. But when we came to the State of Arkansas, in Prairie County, we found there farmers prosperous and happy; the farm buildings in good condition, the live stock fat.

    The farmers have good clothes, good farm implements, they eat good food and plenty of it, have money, in other words, the farmers there have 2everything they need.

    John Jauksztas

    Casimir Kuncia

    Committee: Alexander Bijanskas

    Joseph Butkus

    We, the committee, are recommending to establish a Lithuanian farm colony in the State of Arkansas, Prairie County. We have been in Wisconsin to investigate the land and in Wisconsin ...

    Lithuanian
    I L