The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- December 12, 1892
    Remarks.

    November 30 we read in English paper "Chicago Daily News" a very important news. That the Senatorial Committee of the United States introduced a bill to stop European immigrants to America for the coming year; from March 1, 1893 to March 1, 1894. The causes for stopping the immigration is cholera. Americans are afraid that next year cholera will arise again in Europe, there is a fear that immigrants will infect America with cholera. This introduced bill would be very beneficial to the workers of this land. Americans despise those immigrants who cannot write nor read. Their opinion is such: unenlightened person, uneducated, is living like an animal. Man needs material and spiritual nourishment. He who does not eat cannot live, if you will not nourish your spirit by reading books and newspapers, which gives nourishment to your soul, then such a man is not fair to himself, weakens and impoverishes his own soul, and soul without spiritual work is lost. For this reason Americans build schools, print books, publish large quantities of newspapers, which enlighten the man and the enlightened man morally reared will not become criminal.

    The United States statistics show that the great majority of robbers, thieves and all kinds of criminals are from the uneducated class of people.

    Therefore. for this reason the United States is thinking to issue a new statute against such immigrants of Europe. The new statutes are as follows:

    2

    If a person between 12 to 55 years of age cannot write or read the native language, if married and head of a family, and not having $100.00 will not be allowed to enter United States land, besides this, must have an affidavit from the ambassador of the United States.

    Brothers Lithuanians! We have been speaking to you many times, we did ask and beg you to take out citizen papers, which is of great value to you. Here is what the government can do to those who have no citizen papers: it can send them to such a place where there are very few inhabitants, or unhealthy climate, or if you disobey to such government's attempt, you will be send back to the old country like a prisoner.

    By seeing that the immigration statutes of the United States are changing every year, brothers Lithuanians, we must take in consideration for ourselves that by lack of knowledge of laws, we may get very easily into trouble. Now is the time to bring over our relatives and friends. If you are thinking to remain in America, take out citizen papers without any delay.

    We will help our countryman with courtesy and devotion. Come to our printing shop "Lietuva," at 567 W. 18th St., and we will help you in whatever you need. Do not think, countrymen, that we are doing wrong to you, we are doing this for your sake and Lithuanianism.

    November 30 we read in English paper "Chicago Daily News" a very important news. That the Senatorial Committee of the United States introduced a bill to stop European immigrants to ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, I A 1 a, III A, I M
  • Lietuva -- August 12, 1893
    A Second Reminder about the Lithuanian Colony

    In number 29 of Lietuva we wrote about the necessity of a Lithuanian colony in this country. We are writing again because we received many letters asking information about such a plan, how to establish a Lithuanian colony.

    We have a great opportunity to establish a Lithuanian colony because this country is free, we have liberty, no policemen or any other official can interfere or forbid us to buy land or a farm.

    Look at the workingmen's condition in the city of Chicago, thousands of workers are going from factory to factory seeking jobs, and they get the same answer, "No help wanted." These strong and healthy men are starving. How look at the farmers' life; his barn is full of all kinds of animals, his storehouse is full of grains; the farmer has everything he needs - bread and meat; the farmer eats wholesome food and laughs At the city people and says how crazy the city people are.

    The best place for a Lithuanian colony is Nebraska, the land there is very fertile and cheap. Few Lithuanians farmers already living there are glad and proud that they bought farms. Now those Lithuanians do not know what 2starvation is.

    Seven Lithuanian families declared already their readiness to buy land in the Lithuanian colony. As soon as there is enough Lithuanian families to go on with the establishment of a colony, we will find proper place to buy the land.

    Editor

    In number 29 of Lietuva we wrote about the necessity of a Lithuanian colony in this country. We are writing again because we received many letters asking information about such ...

    Lithuanian
    I L, III G
  • Lietuva -- August 26, 1893
    Lithuanians Do Not Slumber

    Five times we wrote about the need of the Lithuanian colony in this country. Six families appealed to us and sent us two dollars for the cost of advertising in American papers to buy a tract of land. Recently we had still another eight Lithuanian families, and now we have fourteen families ready to join the colony. As soon as we get twenty Lithuanian families, then we will advertise in American papers for such a tract of land. We will make a close deal. The land must be good, close to railroads, rivers, timber, and in a good climate. Through advertising we will get all information from compatriots, and from agents we will get locations, maps, etc.

    We hope that in a few weeks we may be ready to buy a tract of land for the Lithuanian colony.

    Five times we wrote about the need of the Lithuanian colony in this country. Six families appealed to us and sent us two dollars for the cost of advertising in ...

    Lithuanian
    III G
  • Lietuva -- January 31, 1902
    We Must Defend Ourselves

    For the killing of President McKinley by a man of Polish descent who was born in America, and is citizen of this country, the American politicians are denouncing foreigners and demanding that they be deported from America. Whereas, the American government is in the hands of politicians who do not care for justice or morality. These enemies of the foreign people believe that their project will be passed. The politicians are instigating all classes against foreigners. Therefore, we must defend ourselves. We must unite, and make protest against the American politicians' scheme. All the moral people of America are protecting the foreigners. These moral people have organized the Foreigners Protective League. This League is calling on foreigners to defend themselves against the fanatics.

    The White Russian newspaper, Svoboda (Freedom), states that the newspaper editors of foreign language (publications) should print blanks and 2 distribute them among their readers; then the readers should get signatures from citizens and send these protest resolutions to the senators at Washington, D. C. This is a practical project which ought to be started at once, before it is too late.

    We are not urging nor begging our nationals to come to this country and we do not say that this country is heaven, but we do protest against the fanatics who are trying to stop our brothers and sisters from coming into this country, just because they want to. We must stop the scheme of the political fanatics.

    For the killing of President McKinley by a man of Polish descent who was born in America, and is citizen of this country, the American politicians are denouncing foreigners and ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, II B 2 d 1, III B 1, II D 7
  • Lietuva -- February 23, 1902
    The Gracious Communists

    The enemies of freedom in America are preparing fetters for the poor, especially for the foreigners, to whom we Lithuanians belong. The arrival in America of Prince Henry of Prussia means only one thing: to make an agreement with the United States government in order to stop agitation among Lithuanians, Poles and other nationalities in this country against the oppression of these nationalities by Russia and Germany. Remember that these despots do not want to have enlightened people. In Washington, D. C., already a bill has been introduced to persecute those who are agitating against foreign nations. Do the Lithuanians take notice of such a bill that will do us much damage? I wish that the Lithuanians would not slumber on this matter, that they would spread the news among Americans about the sufferings of Lithuanians under the yoke of Russia. At present we have nothing better than a small book in the English language, The Bestiality of the Russian Tsardom Toward Lithuania, in which I and the Rev. Zurba 2 presented the facts of the persecution of Lithuanianism. It seems to me that this book would do some good for the Lithuanians if the book would be distributed among the more prudent Americans. I wish that every good Lithuanian would distribute that book by selling it or by giving it free. The societies for this cause could do very much. I have several thousand copies of this book, even though Mr. Oszewski did not print in his catalog the book's name. One copy of the book is 5 cents, while 100 copies are $2.50. Now is the proper time to spread the book among the Americans.

    J. Szliupas, M. D.

    421 Penn Avenue, Scranton, Pa.

    P.S. The money from the sale of the books I will give to the Lithuanian Freethinkers Alliance.

    The enemies of freedom in America are preparing fetters for the poor, especially for the foreigners, to whom we Lithuanians belong. The arrival in America of Prince Henry of Prussia ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, II B 2 d 3, III B 1, III H, IV
  • Lietuva -- March 14, 1902
    You Must Act Without Delay

    We can call emigration a bad or good thing, but we cannot deny one thing: The Lithuanian emigration up to the present time has brought benefit to the nation. The fatherland has lost its sons and their labor, but what of it, when they have no chance to work in Lithuania. Looking from the other viewpoint, the emigrants in America have raised Lithuanianism very high; they could not have done the same in Lithuania. Further, emigration gives perpetual material help to Lithuania; just count how many thousands of American dollars are sent to Lithuania yearly.

    If the rights of the immigrants in the United States would be suppressed, as the heavy paw of Russia suppresses on the other side, then the Lithuanians would be pressed inside of four walls, and our brothers would be lost.

    2

    Our duty is to put all our energy against the suppression of immigration. We must take into consideration that when the suppression of immigration becomes a law, no force will be able to get rid of it.

    Our individual or group protests at the meetings will not bring the desired results. Therefore, we are making the last and the easiest plan which can be used by Lithuanians of good will. Do it yourself and urge others to do likewise. The time is short but the danger is near. This plan is not made by the editor, but impelled by the American organization, The Immigration Protective League whose duty is to protect the immigrants.

    Every Lithuanian in this country without delay should sign his name and write a short protest and mail it to his congressman and senator. 3 If you cannot formulate the wording of such writing, write as follows:

    (State name of your congressman or senator)

    U. S. Senate

    Washington, D. C.

    Dear Sir: I Hereby respectfully request you to cast your vote against any proposition to restrict the immigration of healthy and honest persons.

    Respectfully yours, (Sign your name and address).

    We can call emigration a bad or good thing, but we cannot deny one thing: The Lithuanian emigration up to the present time has brought benefit to the nation. The ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, III B 1, II D 10, III H
  • Lietuva -- June 21, 1907
    Stole Lithuanian Girl.

    A young Lithuanian girl, Miss Ona Plausinaite, 19 years of age, on June 16th, came from Lithuania to Chicago. At the Baltimore and Ohio station, the policeman was unable to converse with her. In the meantime, a Lithuanian came and stated to the policeman that he knew her and would take her to her uncle at 34th - 14th Place. So the policeman permitted him to take the girl there. Then the girl's brother came. He was unable to find the girl, then asked the policeman. With the policeman he went to 34 - 14th Place. There was only a vacant lot at this number. Then they went to Morgan Street, the address the Lithuanian gave to the policeman, and also found a vacant lot. If any one learns anything about this girl, notify the Lietuva office, or her brother, Joseph Plausinaitis.

    360 Kenwood, Ave., Beloit, Wisconsin.

    A young Lithuanian girl, Miss Ona Plausinaite, 19 years of age, on June 16th, came from Lithuania to Chicago. At the Baltimore and Ohio station, the policeman was unable to ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, II E 2
  • Lietuva -- March 03, 1908
    Our Duty to Take Care

    In No. 8 of Lietuva (and also in other Lithuanian newspapers) the problem of how to help our Lithuanian immigrants has been raised. Many of them have been sent back from Ellis Island simply because they had no clear address of their destination. If the Lithuanians had had a Lithuanian immigration bureau at Ellis Island, or in New York, or Brooklyn, may of our Lithuanian immigrants, who were sent back without great cause or reason, would have been left here. Many of these immigrants were political refugees from Russia. They have been sent back to the prisons of Russia because we have no such bureau to protect them.

    Our main organizations, such as the Lithuanian Roman-Catholic Alliance of America, the Lithuanian Roman-Catholic Federation, the Lithuanian Alliance of America, and the Lithuanian Socialist Alliance of America (also the benevolent societies), must take into consideration the immigration problem.

    2

    Our liberal societies and newspapers have been discussing this problem for some time, but the clerical societies (and especially the clergy) said nothing on this matter. The clergy have been preaching the brotherliness of Christ for a long time, although they have never showed or ever practiced the brotherliness that they have been preaching. Now is the time when the clergy can prove what they preach.

    I think the New York City and Brooklyn Lithuanians ought to establish such an office, and then all the American Lithuanians would help them financially.

    P. Galskis.

    In No. 8 of Lietuva (and also in other Lithuanian newspapers) the problem of how to help our Lithuanian immigrants has been raised. Many of them have been sent back ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, II B 2, II D 7, III C, I E
  • Lietuva -- July 03, 1908
    Honor 25th Anniversary of Arrival in America

    The 25th anniversary or the arrival in America of William Juodvirsis was commemorated at a banquet on June 28th in the home of Miss Ona Kucinskas, 24 West 33rd Street, Chicago. Many relatives and friends attended. Among those present were Peter Petruskevicius, William Vitkus, John Vitkus, Anthony Juodvirsis, and Mrs. Vizinis, from Shenandoah, Pa.

    Historical records show that Lithuanians had started to emigrate to America more than two hundred years ago. Simonas Daukantas, famous Lithuanian historian, states in his Lietuvos Istoria (History of Lithuania) that in 1688 a group or Lithuanian pilgrims left Lithuania by way of Ryga, Latvia, and formed the first Lithuanian colony in America. They settled on Guadeloupe Island, which is a part of the West Indies, in the Caribbean Sea. This Lithuanian colony, which came to America in much the same manner and for the same reasons as the pilgrims of the Mayflower, did not stay long on Guadeloupe Island. About three years later they were dispersed by British 2 soldiers, who attempted to wrest control or the island from the French and the colony moved to New York, which was then a small town, known as New Amsterdam.

    The 200th anniversary of the founding of the first Lithuanian colony in America was appropriately celebrated in 1888 by the Lithuanians of America at Shenandoah, Pa.

    The 25th anniversary or the arrival in America of William Juodvirsis was commemorated at a banquet on June 28th in the home of Miss Ona Kucinskas, 24 West 33rd Street, ...

    Lithuanian
    III G, V B
  • Lietuva -- October 30, 1908
    Paurenas Will Not Be Deported (Summary)

    In a letter dated Oct. 21, and addressed to Jacob H. Schiff, Secretary Root, of the State of New York, informs Mr. Schiff that the government does not intend to deport J. Paurenas (Pouren) or any other person on account of political offenses.

    J. Paurenas, a Latvian, is an escaped revolutionist from Russia. He participated in the Russian Revolution of 1905. At the request of Russian authorities he was imprisoned in New York ten months ago for possible deportation to Russia. Although he committed only political offenses against the imperial Russian government as a revolutionist, nevertheless, the Russian government requested his surrender as a common murderer and criminal.

    A Chicago Lithuanian committee to aid Paurenas, headed by Anthony Kvedaras, has been active here during the past few weeks.

    In a letter dated Oct. 21, and addressed to Jacob H. Schiff, Secretary Root, of the State of New York, informs Mr. Schiff that the government does not intend to ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 7, III B 1, III G