The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Lietuva -- September 16, 1898
    How To Improve the Situation of Our Parish

    In the past few numbers of Lietuva you have seen the situation of the Chicago Lithuanian parish. You have seen the Rev. Krawczunas' public statement of income since the inception of the parish from 1892 to 1896 inclusive, as follows:

    In the statement of 1895 $28,787.78
    In the statement of 1896 34,952.00
    Loan from the bank 15,000.00

    From the time of establishment of this parish up to 1896, income the parish treasury was $78,739.78. Rev. Krawzounas says nothing about how much money he collected from the people in 1897 and 1898. He gave 2 no account of it to his parishioners. The priest's statement of 1896 shows that during one and one half years he collected over $34,000 from his parishioners, which means more than $20,000 per year. Now, if during the slack years he has collected over $20,000 per year, then during the better times in these last two years, if he were unable to collect $20,000, at least he was able to collect $15,000 a year, then, for the last two years it would be as follows:

    Since the establishment of the parish up to 1896 as Rev. Krawczunas stated in his own statement, the income into the parish treasure was $78,739.78. For the last two years, let us say just $30,000.00. From the inception of the parish up to the present time the income to the parish treasury was $108,739.78.

    3

    Here we use the income. The priest is the treasurer of the parish. Now let us glimpse at the spending: could the priest have spent all of that hundred and eight thousand dollars?

    The priest even made a mortgage on the church; then how much money was left to the priest?

    The priest appointed his own committee in order to show the expenses of the parish. but the committee showed only $41,758 expenses. This is too low. The priest had more expenses than the committee stated. We will not go according to the committee's statement, but on the priest's own statement or 1895 and 1896. We will take a very honest account of the expenses:

    4 5
    Fire Insurance $455.00
    Paid off deposits 8,265.00
    Rents before the rectory was built 104.40
    The three year salaries as the priest himself stated 4,824.64
    And for the last two years let us make the same amount of salaries 3,217.00
    Rev. Kolesinski's salary for 22 months at $70 per month 1,540.00
    14 lots (for the church) 11,200.00
    Rectory 9,700.00
    Church 18,169.73
    The church furniture 4,701.04
    The bells 729.94
    The bell tower and steeple 1,275.00
    The street pavements $736.10
    The school house - we can say at 2,000.00
    Fence, improvement of the churchyard 1,000.00
    To Rev. Kolosinski's organist at $30 per month 660.00
    All the expenses were $68,577.91

    New let us compare income and expenses:

    Income $108.739.78
    Expenses $68,577.91
    Then, what has the treasurer (priest) done with the balance of $40,161.87?

    Let the priest explain to us in one way or the other; from the pulpit, 6 at the meeting, or in writing, whichever he thinks is better for him, what became of the balance of $40,151.87.

    We estimated all the expenses that the priest had in the parish affairs. We estimated the land, the buildings, the fence, everything that was bought for the church, and the wages to the servants since the establishment of the church up to the present time. We estimated not of our own knowledge, but according to the priest's public statements of 1895 and 1896. Even though the expenses were very high, still $40,000 was left of parishioners' money.

    If we had taken honest account of that money, and if we ourselves had hired the contractor to build the church, what a church we could have 7 built for $12,000, and not for $18,169.75, as our priest contracted!

    The owner offered those two lots at Auburn Avenue to the parish for $2,500.00, but our priest, for the good of his parishioners, paid $3,600 for them. Maybe all the other expenses were estimated by the priest with the same honesty.

    Now, where is the truth?

    The treasurer (Rev. Krawczunas), by the way, calls himself honest, but when we look into his treasury we find no justice, because the treasurer refuses to show the parish budget books. He hides the books. No one is required to hide the truth. only the wrongdoer is the one who hides the truth.

    8

    $40,000 of the parishioners’ money was lost by the treasurer, and on top of it, there was a $20,000 debt made on the church. Where is Justice? Where is the morality of such a treasurer as our Rev. Krawczunas? Let even one moral parishioner ask himself, is our priest doing right by such a conduct of his parishioners' budget? Shall we leave our priest as treasurer in the future to collect money from the people and to increase the debt on the church?

    As long as we keep the priest as parish treasurer, the debt on the church will not decrease. but will grow up, as the Polish church debt grew from $10,000 up to $100,000. No matter how many thousands of dollars we deposit, the priest's pockets are very deep, they can contain millions of dollars, and yet, the debts on the church will grow.

    9

    If we want to improve the standing of our parish. if we want to pay off the church debt, and to have our church free of debts, we should not deposit our money in the priest's pocket but deposit it in the bank. In the bank our money will be safe, and any time the parish needs the money it can take it. But when the money is deposited in the priest's pocket, from there you cannot take it. Once the priest puts the money in his own pocket, than the parish will not get it. no matter for what purpose the parish needs money. If the money is needed for some improvement of the parish, the priest will never use the parish money; he will borrow the money as he has done in the past. The Polish priest has been doing the same.

    From this day we ought to elect the parish administration; the president, vice-president. secretary, treasurer and collectors.

    10

    We must have the parish ledger. The collectors must deliver the money to the cashier, and the cashier must deposit the money in the bank, and then the bank book must be given to the president. All the administration must be under bond for responsibility for the parish money. The parish officers elected once a year must examine the ledger and the budget. Pay salary to the priest, and leave him the profits of baptism, masses, nuptial services and the funerals, as to the other affairs, the priest should have no rights. The price of baptisms, nuptial services and funerals must be set, and the priest should pay taxes for it. Then we will have order in our parish, the priest will be good to us, and we good to the priest. All the misunderstandings among us will disappear, because there will be nothing to fight for.

    11

    From the last statement of the priest, we see that there are 3,000 parishioners. By paying to the parish treasury $5 by each person each year, in one year $15,000 would be in the bank; in two years would be $30,000, in three years, $45,000, and in ten years we would have $150,000. For $30,000 we would finish our unfinished church; for $50,000 we would establish a hospital; another $50,000 would build an asylum for our old people, orphans and invalids, and the balance of $20,000, we would have in the bank for reserve. We could have a good school, so that some of our Lithuanians could be able to obtain higher education.

    We would have all that, if our money would not go to the priest's pockets. In that manner we could show ourselves that we are good Catholics, love God and our fellow man.

    Today we are depositing everything in the priest’s 12 pocket. Although in our prayers we say: "I love God with all my might and my fellow man as myself," by saying that we are deceiving God Himself. Let us prove where our love of God and our fellow man is. Instead of loving God, we are only loving the priest, we are sticking everything into his pocket, and we pay no attention to the fact that our priest pawned the house of God to the bank.

    Then where is our love for our fellow man? Today, if our fellow Lithuanian is injured on the railroad, or in the factory, loses his legs or arms, where do we put him? We are taking him to the Presbyterian or Protestant hospital. Our old people, who have lost their health, cannot support themselves any more, they find shelter with Protestants, with non-Catholics while we are Catholics. We show our Catholicism only with lips and tongues, but our manners and actions are worse than those of 13 wild people. We are feeding one priest like a fatling, but the invalids, the orphans and the old people, we do not see. If those not Catholic would give no shelter to our poor Lithuanian Catholics, they would starve to death!

    We and our children are sinking into the abyss. We have no place to get enlightenment and education because all of our donations are going into the priest's pocket. Such is our love for our fellow man. Are we not defrauding God by lying in our prayers that "We love our fellow man like ourselves?" For the amount of money that we are wasting on the priest, we could help hundreds of our unfortunate brothers. Then we could show that we love our fellow man, and for that we could obtain God's blessing. Instead of helping our brothers, we are increasing the capital in the bank for the priest. Are we helping Catholicism? No!

    14

    We are increasing the enemies of the priest, and we are humiliating the priest himself. It is time for us, brothers, to wake up; we must not provoke the animosity of our God anymore.

    We should not make the world laugh at us for our improper conduct. It is time to know that God is our God, but not the priest; and to do what God told us, but not what the priest says. As long as we will not make God understand that we are people and behave like people, until then we will not be able to raise ourselves from our unsuitable living condition. So long as we will have in our mind only the priest and the saloon, the people will take us for savages as they are holding us today.

    Brothers, it is time to wake up.

    In the past few numbers of Lietuva you have seen the situation of the Chicago Lithuanian parish. You have seen the Rev. Krawczunas' public statement of income since the inception ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, I A 2 a, I A 2 b, II D 3, II D 4, II D 5, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- October 04, 1907
    The Lithuanian Hospital

    Dr. Butkevicius has sponsored the organization of a Lithuanian hospital, a building under the name of "The Lithuanian Hospital." Such an organization has already been formed. The president of this society is Joseph J. Elias, commissioner of Cook county, who contracted to buy the lots for the hospital at the corner of 46th and Western Avenue.

    The first official meeting of this society will be held on the 4th day of October, at 8 P. M., 4630 Gross Avenue, in the hall of the University of Chicago Settlement. This meeting will be important because it will be decided the project of the hospital.

    All members of this organization must come and we are inviting all Lithuanians to this meeting in order to get acquainted with this new hospital organization.

    Dr. Butkevicius has sponsored the organization of a Lithuanian hospital, a building under the name of "The Lithuanian Hospital." Such an organization has already been formed. The president of this ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 3
  • Lietuva -- November 29, 1907
    On the Affairs of the Lithuanian Hospital

    In the north side section of Chicago we have had a variety of speakers: national, political and religious. But on the 12th day of November, at the St. Michael Archangel Church hall, there was delivered an entirely different speech by J. Elias, about the Lithuanian hospital. I am sorry to say that his speech had no relation to the proposed project, the Lithuanian hospital. He stated how one worker was dying in a hospital, how Elias himself induced the priest to bring the cross to the dying man to be kissed. Further on he said that the Lithuanians must contribute $40,000, for which they can buy the lots for the hospital, then when the lots are bought, Americans will build the hospital building and the hospital will be under the control of the Americans.

    If the hospital is not to be under Lithuanian control, why then must the Lithuanians contribute money for such a hospital? It is much better for Lithuanians to send a few Lithuanian doctors to 2the County Hospital, where the sick Lithuanians could talk with the doctor in their own language. After the so-called speech, the Lithuanians were conversing among themselves, saying that they do not see what benefit such a hospital would bring to the Lithuanians.

    It would be a good thing if the promoters of the hospital would announce their program for the hospital to be built. Otherwise the people are in darkness. Are private hospitals better than those hospitals which are under public control?

    A Worker.

    In the north side section of Chicago we have had a variety of speakers: national, political and religious. But on the 12th day of November, at the St. Michael Archangel ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 3, III A, III C
  • Lietuva -- February 26, 1909
    Lithuanian Tailors Form Mutual Benefit Club

    There are probably more Lithuanian tailors living in Chicago than in any other American city. However, they have been so quiet that nothing has been written about them in our newspapers. Now they have become active.

    On January 8, the Lithuanian tailors of Chicago organized a mutual aid club, which is to be known as the Mutual Benefit Club of Lithuanian Tailors. Only Lithuanians engaged in the tailoring trade are eligible for membership. The initiation fee will be one dollar; dues will be twenty-five cents per month. Sick members shall receive six dollars per week. All members will be entitled to sick benefits even if they move out of Chicago to other cities or towns in the United States.

    2

    Apart from the sick benefits, the club will endeavor to promote the intellectual and cultural development of the members as much as possible; it is planned to establish a Lithuanian-American library and to sponsor educational lectures. In other words, the purpose of the club will be to unite and assist all members in every possible manner.

    The new club cordially invites all Lithuanian tailors living in Chicago to join the club. A special meeting, during which new members will be accepted, will be held on Sunday afternoon, February 28, at the Balkevis Hall, 823 No. Marshfield Avenue. At this meeting the initiation fee for all new members will only be one dollar; later the initiation fee will be increased in accordance with the age of the applicant.

    3

    The regular monthly meetings of the club will be held on the first Wednesday evening of every month. Address all communications in regard to the club to the secretary, J. Mickevicius, 18 Ellen Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    There are probably more Lithuanian tailors living in Chicago than in any other American city. However, they have been so quiet that nothing has been written about them in our ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 1, II B 2 a, III B 2, II D 3, IV
  • Lietuva -- March 19, 1909
    Chicago Lithuanian Mutual Benefit Association

    A new mutual aid society has just been organized; it is to be known as the Chicago Lithuanian Mutual Benefit Association. Every Lithuanian, who speaks Lithuanian, who is healthy in body and mind, between 16 and 40 years of age, is eligible for membership.

    The membership body of the new society will be divided into two classes: Those who pay 50 cents per month will receive a weekly sick benefit of $10.00; those who pay 25 cents per month will receive a weekly sick benefit of $5.00. The society will be affiliated with the Lithuanian Alliance of America in order that the members may receive a death benefit. Members who will travel or move to other cities in the United States will receive permits and will be entitled to both sick and death benefits.

    Besides the sick and death benefits to members the Association will 2assist in promoting the educational uplift of the Lithuanian people; a Lithuanian-American public library will be established and maintained by the Association.

    All those who wish to join this society are invited to come to the next meeting of the A sociation, which will take place on Saturday evening, March 20, at P. Balkis Hall, 823 N. Marshfield Avenue. During this meeting the initiation fee for all new members will be only $1.00.

    Address all communications to the Association to the secretary, Julius Mickevicius, 18 Ellen Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    [Translator's note: This Association is now known as the Chicago Lithuanian Society, and is the largest Lithuanian mutual aid society in Chicago; it has close to 6,000 members.]

    A new mutual aid society has just been organized; it is to be known as the Chicago Lithuanian Mutual Benefit Association. Every Lithuanian, who speaks Lithuanian, who is healthy in ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 1, III B 2, II D 2, II D 3, IV
  • Lietuva -- April 09, 1915
    Organization Formed to Establish Day Nursery

    An organization for the purpose of establishing a day nursery was formed last week in the Bridgeport district of Chicago. The nursery will take care of the children of employed mothers while the latter are at work.

    The newly formed organization is composed of Lithuanian and non-Lithuanian women. The following officers were elected: Mrs. Zimontas, president; Mrs. Davis, vice-president; Mrs. Damijonaitis, recording secretary; Mrs. Jerome, treasurer.

    Mrs. Damijonaitis stated during an interview that the first step of the organization will be to raise sufficient funds for the establishment of the projected day nursery for children. A fairly large sum of money must be collected before the nursery can be opened. However, it is believed that the people of the neighborhood will recognize the importance of the day nursery and will not refuse to assist the organization. It is predicted that it will be possible to open the nursery sometime during midsummer.

    2

    Employed mothers will be able to leave their children at the nursery in the morning and take them home in the evening. A trained and experienced nurse will be employed to take care of the children. An effort will be made to find a Lithuanian for that position.

    It is planned to charge ten cents per day for the care of each child at the nursery. For this money the child will receive supervision and food. Only children who are at least one year old will be accepted.

    The projected day nursery will be located in the first house east of Fellowship House at 831 West 33rd Place.

    The organization also plans to establish a clinic in Fellowship House where people of the neighborhood will be able to receive medical attention and medicine free of charge. The doctor of this clinic will also look after the health of the children in the day nursery.

    An organization for the purpose of establishing a day nursery was formed last week in the Bridgeport district of Chicago. The nursery will take care of the children of employed ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 4, II D 3
  • Lietuva -- May 07, 1915
    Activities of Lithuanian Doctors

    The Lithuanian-American Physicians Society met last Saturday, May 1, at 3261 South Halsted Street. An election of officers took place with the following results: Dr. A. L. Juska, president; Dr. J. Kulis, vice-president; Dr. K. Drangelis, secretary; Dr. A. J. Zimontas, treasurer.

    At a previous meeting the Society endorsed Attorney John Kuchinskas for the office of city attorney. A letter from Mayor Thompson on this matter was read at the meeting. The mayor promised to take into consideration the recommendation of the doctors when he makes an appointment to the office.

    The Bridgeport branch of the Lithuanian Roman Catholic Temperance Society appealed to the Society to furnish lecturers for the anti-alcohol exhibit to be conducted by the Temperance Society for two days, on Wednesday and Thursday of this week at the St. George's (Lithuanian) parish hall. The Society selected Dr. Juska, Dr. Jonikaitis, and Dr. Drangelis to lecture at the exhibit.

    2

    The Chicago Lithuanian Roman Catholic Benevolent Association invited the Society jointly to establish a free dispensary, where poor people could receive free medical attention. The Society has been planning for quite some time to establish such a dispensary. A committee for this purpose, composed of Dr. Juska and Dr. Kulis, was formed some time ago. Two more members, Dr. Jonikaitis and Dr. Wiegner (a Latvian), were added to the committee at this meeting. The committee was authorized to investigate the proposal of the Association. It was pointed out at the meeting that the Society would be willing to join the Association in establishing a dispensary, provided that full control over the dispensary is assigned to the Society.

    The Society now has seventeen members; twelve reside in Chicago and five in the eastern states.

    The Lithuanian-American Physicians Society met last Saturday, May 1, at 3261 South Halsted Street. An election of officers took place with the following results: Dr. A. L. Juska, president; Dr. ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 c, II D 3, II A 1, III C, I B 1, I F 4