The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- December 10, 1892
    International Society

    A meeting was held by the International Society, Nov. 27, 1892, at MAJAUCKAS Hall, 777 Milwaukee Avenue. The program was our own to improve the workingman's condition. The speaker X. was from the province of Kaunas, a student of Berlin University. The speaker said "do not believe that the anarchists with their bombs will bring benefit to the workers. It will not. Such an action is against a democratic government policy." The speaker said that in this democratic country the best weapon of the working men is the ballot. We do not need to shed blood nor use fire. We workingmen can win our fight, improve our living conditions by ballot because we are 95% while only 5% own the wealth and control the government. We need education and we can obtain knowledge only through literature. When the workingmen are organized we do not need to shed blood. We will improve our living conditions by peaceful assembly and ballot.

    A meeting was held by the International Society, Nov. 27, 1892, at MAJAUCKAS Hall, 777 Milwaukee Avenue. The program was our own to improve the workingman's condition. The speaker X. ...

    Lithuanian
    I E, II B 2 g
  • Lietuva -- December 16, 1893
    The Purpose of Simonas Daukantas Society

    December 10, a meeting was held by the society of Simonas Daukantas, the constitution was adopted, and after many discussions the meeting decided upon the following principles:

    1. To spread education among Lithuanians, to teach the Lithuanian language, to propagate Lithuanian literature.

    2. To establish a library, to keep all kinds of Lithuanian books and newspapers, and also books in other languages.

    3. The society will celebrate all national holidays, and will present theatrical plays.

    4. The society will take part in spiritual and material activities.

    2

    5. The society will take part in American and European politics.

    6. The society will collect relics for the Lithuanian Museum.

    7. The society will help those Lithuanians who are seeking higher education.

    8. The society will join the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America, and will never participate in any action against the Catholic religion. (Trans. note: - The society still exists, now as a liberal society, and does not participate in nor supports any religious activities.)

    3

    Any Lithuanian of good morals and manners, and who is over sixteen years of age, can join this society.

    All money from dues and donations will be used for the library of Lithuanian literature. The initiation fee is fifty cents. Monthly dues are fifteen cents.

    Any member of this society may be fined or expelled from the society for any bad manners or bad activities.

    Sick members must be visited by society members, and given spiritual and material aid.

    At every meeting of this society scientific questions must be brought for discussion and for proper explanation.

    4

    J. Kolesinskis gave one book, History of the Church; the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America gave one book, History of Europe, and another, The Manners of Ancient Lithuanians, of Samogitians and Mountaineers.

    Also Mr. M. Nomeskis, who has a large book store in Tilzen Ost, Germany, donated sixteen copies of various books.

    December 10, a meeting was held by the society of Simonas Daukantas, the constitution was adopted, and after many discussions the meeting decided upon the following principles: 1. To spread ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 b, II B 2 a, III B 2, II B 2 g
  • Lietuva -- March 31, 1899
    Dr. John Szliupas in Chicago

    Last Sunday Dr. Szliupas came to Chicago from Scranton, Pa. At a few meetings he delivered short lectures on Lithuanian history, explained the hardships and causes of it. He urged us to have unity, brotherly love, and the importance of getting enlightened by reading good books and newspapers.

    Almost all the Lithuanians in America are working people, so Dr. Szliupas urged them, in order to improve their living conditions, to join labor organizations. In unity there is strength. Organized labor can overthrow capitalism and take control of the government. The doctor said that not only the capitalists are against the improvement of labor's living conditions, but the clergy, who controlling the peoples' mind are forbidding the people to get enlightenment. Dr. Szliupas is advertised as an infidel, and that he wants to destroy the present form of government.

    2

    Nevertheless, many people came to hear his lectures, and the doctor never advocated the overthrow of the government. All the Lithuanians at the meetings were in good order, there were no disturbances. Honor to Lithuanians for such good conduct.

    Last Sunday Dr. Szliupas came to Chicago from Scranton, Pa. At a few meetings he delivered short lectures on Lithuanian history, explained the hardships and causes of it. He urged ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g, I D 2 a 2, I D 1 a, III C, I E
  • Lietuva -- December 22, 1899
    Meeting of the Lithuanian Workers of Chicago

    Dec. 17, 1899. The Lithuanian workers held a meeting at Liandanskas Hall, 3301 S. Morgan St. There were eight speakers; they spoke about the unfair treatment of the working class. The speakers urged the Lithuanian workers to join the Socialist Labor Party. After the speeches, there were organized the Lithuanian Socialist Labor Party Local;24 members joined the Socialist Labor Party cluster.

    The officials were elected of the following members: S. Kodis, organizer; A. Lalis, secretary; K. Kazokas, financial secretary.

    Dec. 17, 1899. The Lithuanian workers held a meeting at Liandanskas Hall, 3301 S. Morgan St. There were eight speakers; they spoke about the unfair treatment of the working class. ...

    Lithuanian
    I E, II B 2 g, IV
  • Lietuva -- May 20, 1904
    The South Chicago Lithuanians

    The Society of St. Izidor held a celebration on May 1st, the third year of its existence. There were speeches, songs and declamations. Such an event the South Chicago Lithuanians never had seen or heard before.

    The Americans have considered the Lithuanians as the lowest class of people, similar to the Poles, but now when they saw the orderly Lithuanian parade on the streets, they were convinced that the Lithuanians are different from the Poles.

    After the parade speeches were made. The first speaker was the president of the society, Mr. J. Baukus. He opened the meeting and explained the purpose of the celebration. Then Mr. Petrosius spoke, praising the St. Izidor Society for celebrating such an important day as the first day of May. He condemned the St. Joseph Society because it called the 2St. Izidor Society as nationalist, not holy. Even though our society has the holy name of St. Izidor, the speaker condemned the Lithuanian degenerates and asked for unity. "Lithuanians must unite," he said, "they must buy from our Lithuanian business establishments in order to increase and uplift Lithuanian business." Then the Providence of God choir, under the direction of the organist A. Limontas, sang the following songs: "The Healthy and Fortunate Day has Cleared Up," "On the Edge of the Sea," "Farewell, Lithuania," "Long Live Lithuania," "The Longest Years." They sang well. Declamations were recited by two small girls, sisters. Little Sophy Laukiute recited the poem, "Forward, Brother Friend," and Anna Laukiute recited, "Not He That is so Great." These two little girls made the greatest impression because such declamations had not been heard before in this place, and the little girls spoke so beautifully from their hearts with such perfect expression.

    Mr. Joseph Laukis delivered a speech on the importance of the 1st of May. This day is celebrated by workers all over the world. The 3speaker said that it is not enough to have the Lithuanian Alliance of America, the workers should have their own political organization, the Socialist Party organization which is the only workers' party that fights against the oppressors. The workers must organize local branches of the Socialist Party, etc. There had been organized a Lithuanian Socialist branch, but the Lithuanians did not understand its benefits. The Lithuanian Socialist branch was finally dissolved.

    Mr. J. Medelis spoke of the exile of our brothers to Siberia for Lithuanianism. He said that we must help these martyrs. Later he mentioned the poor Lithuanian students. The nation cannot make progress without its own scientists and educators. We must help the students, too. The sum collected was $2.20, which was divided as follows: $1 for the martyrs; $1 for the Aurora's students' fund; and 20 cents for the writer Vistalius. Between the speeches were songs and declamations. The Lithuanian musicians played beautiful melodies.

    The Meeting's Secretary.

    The Society of St. Izidor held a celebration on May 1st, the third year of its existence. There were speeches, songs and declamations. Such an event the South Chicago Lithuanians ...

    Lithuanian
    I E, II B 2 g, II B 1 a, II D 10, III H, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- January 27, 1905
    From Chicago, Illinois

    The Lithuanian Independent Club of Chicago held its semi-annual meeting, Dec. 17, 1904. Mr. Zehaitis, the chairman of the evening, made a motion to make collections for the relief of Lithuanian exiles in Siberia, and for students aid. The motion was carried and $10 was collected. This sum was divided into two parts, $5 was given to the exiles in Siberia and $5 was sent to the Aurora Society Fund, for poor students.

    The club decided to make contributions at every meeting towards other worthy causes, such as helping poor students who are in need of funds, the Lithuanians in exile, and other who are in need of assistance.

    We cannot bear to see our people suffer Russian persecution and injustice. Our people have been heavily burdened for many generations by the tyrannical Russian government. Now we have to share Russia's burden. We 2share their burden financially.

    Those who can afford it are asked to contribute to the relief fund as much as possible. It is our moral duty to help our brothers and sisters across the sea. We must make every effort to extend a helping hand to our needy ones. They depend upon us for help and we cannot forget them, for it is our duty to help people.

    All future meetings will be held at the Azuka's Hall, which is located at 33rd St. and Auburn Ave., Chicago, Ill.

    These meetings will be held every 2nd and 3rd Saturday of the month. We invite all those who want to join our club. The club gives aid to its members when they are sick and cannot work. It costs only $1.00 to join this club.

    The Lithuanian Independent Club of Chicago held its semi-annual meeting, Dec. 17, 1904. Mr. Zehaitis, the chairman of the evening, made a motion to make collections for the relief of ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 1, II B 2 g, II D 10
  • Lietuva -- February 03, 1905
    Revolutionary Meeting

    A large meeting was held last Sunday at the Auditorium, the largest hall in Chicago. The well-known Russian revolutionary woman, Catherine Breshkovskaya, spoke of the present revolution in Russia and the oppression of the tsar's regime.

    Other speakers were the famous Rabbi Dr. Hirsch of Chicago; T. J. Morgan, J. Jones and other Americans. There were about 3,000 people present.

    A large meeting was held last Sunday at the Auditorium, the largest hall in Chicago. The well-known Russian revolutionary woman, Catherine Breshkovskaya, spoke of the present revolution in Russia and ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g, III H, I E, IV
  • Lietuva -- September 15, 1905
    Meeting of the Lithuanian of America

    p.2....The Lithuanian Alliance of America held its semi-annual meeting Saturday evening Sept. 9, at Mildazis Hall on the West Side. The speakers of the evening were as follows: Mr. M.J. Damijonaitis, F. Eismontas, A. Kuema, and J. Girijotas, who explained the aims and purpose of this organization, stating that the Lithuanian Alliance of America, as a beneficiary society, is the most important organization of Lithuanian people in America. Mr. Eismontas explained the subject further and went on to say that the Lithuanian Alliance of America is a national organization and is organized for the purpose of helping and uniting all the Lithuanians in the United States. One can derive many benefits by belonging to the national organization.

    L.L.A. is an organization from which we benefit in many ways from a material and cultural point. If this organization has not yet accomplished its original aims, it will in the future,as it grows stronger and larger. Then we can expect 2something from this organization because its membership will have increased.

    The second speaker, Mr. M.J.Damijonaitis urged those who agreed with the aims of the organization to join the organization as soon as possible. One man from the audience stood up and made the motion that a separate chapter of the Lithuanian Alliance of America be organized on the West Side for those people who live too far and cannot attend the meetings regularly. That motion was carried and so it was then and there decided to organize a new chapter on the West Side.

    The decision was unanimous; not a single person in the audience was opposed to the idea. Soon after discussion, twenty-one new members signed up, and the new chapter was organized.

    The executive board was elected the very same evening as follows: President, Peter Yakstas; secretary, Vincas Makaveckas; cashier, M. Mildazia. There is hope 3that the new chapter of the Lithuanian Alliance of America will grow bigger and stronger in the future. The Chicago Lithuanians will begin to realize the value of the Lithuanian Alliance of America and will join in greater number, if we launch a lively campaign.

    Fellow-countrymen, let us work together in unity, so that we can be proud of our work and show at the next convention that we are doing our part well as can be expected. Let us talk to the people and persuade them to join the Lithuanian Alliance of America society which is the largest beneficiary organization in the United States, organized for the sole purpose of helping the people who are sick and unable to work any more. It is much better to belong to one large beneficiary society such as the Lithuanian Alliance of America than to many small beneficiary societies which are not even interested in our national affairs or working for the benefit of our people.

    Now is the time to get busy before the 21st convention of the L.A.A. next May in Chicago.

    4

    Members of the alliance in Pennsylvania are protesting against holding the convention in Chicago. They state that Chicagoans do not deserve that honor, because they have attracted very few members to the Alliance. Therefore, let us strive to obtain a few hundred members before the 21st convention. In that way we will demonstrate that the 20th convention did not err in deciding to hold the first convention in twenty years in Chicago. Therefore, every one of us who are Lithuanians join the SUSIVIENYIMAS LIETUVIA AMERIKOJE (Lithuanian Alliance of America).

    p.2....The Lithuanian Alliance of America held its semi-annual meeting Saturday evening Sept. 9, at Mildazis Hall on the West Side. The speakers of the evening were as follows: Mr. M.J. ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 2 g, IV
  • Lietuva -- April 13, 1906
    To Chicago Lithuanians

    The American Medical Association teaches the public through lectures and pictures how to protect and cure itself of tuberculosis. This is very important to our compatriots. The admission is free to such lectures.

    The "Exhibit of Devices and Appliances for Treatment of Tuberculosis" will start on April 2nd, on the fifth floor of the Public Library Building, Michigan Avenue between Washington and Randolph streets. The exhibit will be open daily from April 2nd to 28. We urge all the Lithuanians who understand English to attend these lectures.

    During the month of May the same exhibit will be held in Milwaukee, Wis. We are asking Lithuanians of this city not to miss these important health instructions.

    Antanas K. Rutkauskas

    (Mr. Rutkauskas at present is a physician)

    The American Medical Association teaches the public through lectures and pictures how to protect and cure itself of tuberculosis. This is very important to our compatriots. The admission is free ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g, I M, IV
  • Lietuva -- June 04, 1906
    Lithuanian Socialists Lecture

    On June 2, a public meeting was held at Freiheit Turner hall. The lecture was arranged by the 4th branch of the Lithuanian Socialist Alliance of America. The speaker was Pius Grigaitis who recently came from Lithuania. Pius Grigaitis in his long lecture presented the awful conditions in Russia and Lithuania, and what happened there during the two years of revolution. The people were moved when Grigaitis stated the brutality of the Russian government to the people. Grigaitis himself suffered much, was beaten almost to death, still he has energy to fight against the tyranny of the Russian despot.

    The lecture collected for the revolutionary cause - $36.00. The 4th branch of the Lithuanian Socialist donated $35.00. Total - $71.00

    On June 9, Sokol Hall, 821 So. Ashland Avenue, the socialist's lectures will be held for the cause of revolutionary movement in Russia. Grigaitis will speak there, also American, Russian and Polish speakers will speak at this meeting.

    A. Z.

    On June 2, a public meeting was held at Freiheit Turner hall. The lecture was arranged by the 4th branch of the Lithuanian Socialist Alliance of America. The speaker was ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 g, III H, I E