The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Lietuva -- March 04, 1896
    Protest and Appeal to All Lithuanians (Synopsis)

    We, the members of the Simonas Daukantas society have the purpose to proclaim science amongst Lithuanians, to propagate Lithuanian literature, to Maintain a large library, to collect Lithuanian relics for the museum which now we are preparing to have. But here, we read an article in Tevyne (Fatherland). organ of the Lithuanian Alliance of America that all Lithuanias are changing into Englishman, we became discouraged and worried when we read that article. We are sorry to hear that the Lithuanians become Englishmen and forget about the dear motherland Lithuania of which every foot was sprinkled with blood, the suffering of our forefathers in defending their land. If some other newspaper would say that about Lithuanians it would not discourage us so much, but when the organ of the Lithuanian Alliance says that, we are very sorry for that.

    If Hollanders and Swedes would change into Englishmen, we would not be surprised, because their language is smilar to English, but for Lithuanians it is impossible to change. Lithuanians can become Englishment only for the lack of enlightenment. The Tevyne's editor says that the Frenchmen in Canada.

    2

    even though they are under the English rule, are still Frenchmen. We will remind the editor of Tevyne that in New Orleans, La., and in the other cities in the States of Georgia and Florida, the French people lived there for the last three hundred years and they are not Englishmen yet; they are still Frenchmen.

    The Irish people lost their language by oppression and yet they are Irishman, but not Englishmen, although they cannot speak any more of their own language.

    For many years there had been many German colonies in America, they still speak their language and they are still Germans.

    The Jews were persecuted in every land and nation, and they have not yet assimilated with any nation.

    A cultured people will never assimilate with other nationality. What 3The Russian government accomplished when he tried by force to Russianize the Lithuanians. Thousands of Lithuanians died in exile, thousands were hanged and shot -- and yet even by force, our Lithuanians did not change into Russians.

    The Lithuanians in this country are organizing societies, publishing books and newspapers, building the churches with their own money. Is there any proof that the Lithuanians are changing into Englishmen?

    We, the members of Simonas Daukantas society, after many discussions in the meeting, decided to raise the protest against the organ Tevyne for such an insult to the Lithuanians. The organ would do much better if it would spread education and enlightenment among Lithuanians instead of publishing such insults about Lithuanians.

    In this age education is the most important thing; science is going forward with tremendous speed; we do not need to wait for a ozar or any other despot that would give us education and freedom. We must educate ourselves, 4and when we become a cultured people, we will overthrow the yoke of the czar, and will show to the people in this country, that we are an able and cultured people.

    Take the Czechs, they have their organizations, halls and churches in Chicago. They never think of calling themselves Englishmen. They are Czechs, although they are highly educated and cultured people.

    Lithuania perished through the ignorance of her people, but the enlightened people will resurrect her.

    The Simonas Daukantas Society

    We, the members of the Simonas Daukantas society have the purpose to proclaim science amongst Lithuanians, to propagate Lithuanian literature, to Maintain a large library, to collect Lithuanian relics for ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, II B 1 d, II B 2 a, II B 2 f, III B 2, II B 2 d 2, I C
  • Lietuva -- May 17, 1901
    From the Lithuanian Newspapers (Editorial Review)

    In last week's issue, the Saule (The Sun, Mahanoy City, Pa.) gives a suggestion on how to stop the polemics among the Lithuanian newspapers. That newspaper suggests that the publishers and editors of the newspapers hold a convention.

    That the wrangle of our newspapers and their personal disputes have nothing to do with the public affairs, no one will deny. But would a convention of publishers and editors stop the wrangle? To make an agreement is very easy, but to fulfill it is another matter. Among the American-Lithuanian newspapers there are many detestable controversies, and especially the Saule which, with its polemics, has left all other newspapers behind. The clerical newspapers say that the liberals are criticizing the clergy too much. Yes, we do. But the clericals are using the most detestable polemics against the liberals. Take the clerical newspaper Zvaigzde (Star) for instance. You will 2find (in it) such dirty, detestable nicknames for their opponents that one wonders how the spiritual leaders can use such low language for the expression of their ideas. If the liberal newspapers would have followed the clerical press, it would have been necessary to invent new words in the dictionary of the American-Lithuanian newspapers.

    Would a convention of publishers and editors be able to stop the clergy from denouncing the liberals in their newspapers, pulpits and on lecture platforms? What remains for the denounced person to do but to answer with the same words the clergy uses?

    We must state that among our newspaper men there is too much hypocrisy. Newspapermen use the worse slanders in order to harm their opponents.

    Rev. Kaupas in last week's issue of Tevyne (The Fatherland. Organ of the Lithuanian Alliance of America) announced to the Lithuanian public that he has found the cause of the present disputes in the Lithuanian 3Alliance. The cause is that the censure of the Lithuanian Alliance's president makes it impossible even to breathe. The priest says that in order to stop such polemics the organ Tevyne should be issued monthly instead of weekly. Then, according to the priest, the wolf and the sheep could drink from the same spring. This is really a good invention; the priest ought to patent it.

    As Krilov says, there are in this world some people who can see only the small bugs, so they let the big bugs fly into their eyes. For the real cause of these polemics Rev. Kaupas must look to the other side, to his brother priests.

    In last week's issue, the Saule (The Sun, Mahanoy City, Pa.) gives a suggestion on how to stop the polemics among the Lithuanian newspapers. That newspaper suggests that the publishers ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2, III C
  • Lietuva -- October 20, 1907
    Read "The Future World"

    We have started to publish a new, scientific journal, will publish the most important material, such as Count L.N. Tolistoi's,- "My Religion", and other romantic and scientific articles. Such a journal we need very much. Publisher, M.G. Valaskas,

    2464 Kensington Avenue,

    Chicago, Illinois.

    We have started to publish a new, scientific journal, will publish the most important material, such as Count L.N. Tolistoi's,- "My Religion", and other romantic and scientific articles. Such a ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Lietuva -- November 20, 1908
    New Lithuanian Periodigal Erelis Appears in Chicago

    A new Lithuanian periodical entitled Erelis (The Eaglet), has just appeared in Chicago. The address of the new publication is 4619 So. Ashland Avenue, Chicago. It is supposed to be a magazine of humor; however, it contains very little humor. The grammar, also, can be severely criticized.

    A new Lithuanian periodical entitled Erelis (The Eaglet), has just appeared in Chicago. The address of the new publication is 4619 So. Ashland Avenue, Chicago. It is supposed to be ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Lietuva -- January 01, 1909
    New Lithuanian Periodical to Be Published in Chicago

    The Zinia (News) Society, a newly organized Chicago Lithuanian society, has completed plans for the publication of a new Lithuanian monthly magazine, entitled Musu Gyvenimas (Our Life).

    The Musu Gyvenimas will contain the following sections: (1) Long scientific and educational articles;(2) short fiction stories;(3) bibliography;(4) comments and criticism;(5) various miscellaneous articles;(5) questions of the day;(7) poetry;(8) all kinds of books, etc.

    In order to encourage and attract the best writers the Zinia Society will 2make an effort to pay for all manuscripts that are accepted for publication in the Musu Gyvenimas. The publication will be independent, and shall not serve any party or organization. Controversial writings will not be published. The periodical will be in the form of a booklet and will contain about forty-eight pages.

    Bruno Vargsas, famous Lithuanian author and playwright, has been invited to become the editor of the Musu Gyvenimas. Mr. Vargsas is the author of the following theatrical plays: "Paskutine Banga" (The Last Wave); "Antras Krikstas" (The Second Baptism); "Milijonai Vandenyj" (Millions in Water); "Saliamono Sapnas" (Solomon's Dream); "Pirmi Zingsniai" (The First Steps); "Galilelio Galilejus" (Galileo of Galilee); and many short fiction stories and monologues.

    3

    All Lithuanians are asked to support this new publication; its success depends altogether upon the support of the Lithuanians of Chicago and the United States. The Muso Gyvenimas promises to play an important role in the educational and cultural uplift of our people. Therefore, it deserves the full support of every Lithuanian. Those who are in sympathy with our plan are asked to subscribe to the Muso Gyvenimas immediately. The subscription rate is $1.50 per year; single numbers will be 15 cents.

    Address all communications in regards to the Musu Gyvenimas to the Zinia Society, 2515 Kensington Avenue, Pullman Station, Chicago, Illinois.

    The Zinia (News) Society, a newly organized Chicago Lithuanian society, has completed plans for the publication of a new Lithuanian monthly magazine, entitled Musu Gyvenimas (Our Life). The Musu Gyvenimas ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2, IV
  • Lietuva -- August 06, 1909
    Dagis, Lithuanian Monthly, to Be Published in Chicago

    The Dagis (Thistle), monthly magazine of humor and satire, several numbers of which have been published in Boston, Mass., has changed ownership and, beginning with the next issue it will be published in Chicago, Ill., at 812 W. 33rd Street. The policy of the magazine will not be changed. However, the contents and technique of the magazine will be greatly improved. It will have a new editor and manager.

    The Dagis (Thistle), monthly magazine of humor and satire, several numbers of which have been published in Boston, Mass., has changed ownership and, beginning with the next issue it will ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Lietuva -- August 13, 1909
    Erelis to Be Published Weekly

    The Erelis (Eaglet), monthly magazine of satire, which is being published in Chicago by A. Simkus at 4543 S. Ashland Avenue, will become a weekly in October.

    It is planned to convert the magazine into a newspaper, and besides satirical and humorous matter, it will publish all kinds of news and educational articles. The subscription price will be increased from the present fifty cents to one dollar fifty cents per year.

    At present the satire and literary quality of the Erelis is slightly worse than that of the Saule (The Sun), which is published in Mahanoy City, Pa., 2but is slightly better than that of the Lietuviu Zinios (Lithuanian News), which is published in Chicago by Mr. Baronas. It does not seem probable that the contents of the publication will be improved.

    The circulation of the Erelis is probably the same as that of the Dilgeles (a prickly and irritating weed), which is being published in Pittsburgh, Pa., by Mr. Baltrusaitis.

    Therefore, Chicago will have four Lithuanian periodicals--three weeklies and one monthly.

    The Erelis (Eaglet), monthly magazine of satire, which is being published in Chicago by A. Simkus at 4543 S. Ashland Avenue, will become a weekly in October. It is planned ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Lietuva -- August 20, 1909
    New Lithuanian Publications

    Is Muzikos Srities (From the Field of Music), by Mikas Petrauskas, a book of twenty-four pages, has been published by the Lietuva (Lithuania). This book, written by the celebrated musical artist, appeared first in the Lietuva on installments, and was afterwards published separately in book form. It contains a short history of music. The most important part of the book deals with the history of musical instruments, especially Lithuanian instruments.

    Dagis (Thistle), a monthly magazine of humor and satire, has already published its fifth number, the July issue, in Chicago, at 812 W. 33rd Street. Previously it was published in Boston, Mass. It was transferred to Chicago after a change of ownership. The new issue of the magazine is greatly improved, especially in a technical manner.

    Is Muzikos Srities (From the Field of Music), by Mikas Petrauskas, a book of twenty-four pages, has been published by the Lietuva (Lithuania). This book, written by the celebrated musical ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 3, II B 2 d 2, IV
  • Lietuva -- October 15, 1909
    Statistical Survey of Chicago Lithuanians

    The results of statistical surveys of individual Chicago Lithuanian colonies were published in previous issues of the Lietuva (Lithuania). Today, we are publishing the combined results of all these surveys, which cover all the Lithuanians of Chicago and vicinity.

    Altogether, there are one hundred nineteen Lithuanian organizations in Chicago. They are located in the following Lithuanian colonies: twenty-five in Bridgeport; eighteen in the 18th and Halsted Streets colony; twenty-two in the West Side or McCormick colony; twenty in Town of Lake; eleven in the North Side colony; seven in the Roseland and Kensington colonies; four in South Chicago; three in West Pullman; two in Melrose Park; and two in Grant Works (Cicero, Ill.). These figures include lodges and branches of national Lithuanian organizations.

    These one hundred nineteen organizations are divided as follows: sixty-two 2are non-Catholic; forty-one are Catholic; ten political; two Lutheran; three are mixed; and two are Polish-Lithuanian societies.

    The character of these societies is classified as follows: seventy-four are benefit societies; twenty lodges and branches of national Lithuanian organizations; eleven clubs; seven building and loan associations; six educational societies; eight commercial organizations; five women's societies; three skilled workers societies; three musical societies; two dramatic societies; and two companies. [Translator's note: -- The total of these figures amounts to one hundred forty-one. Apparently, the twenty lodges and branches and the two companies are not included in the one hundred nineteen figure given above].

    The lodges and branches of national Lithuanian organizations are classified as follows: Eight lodges of the Lithuanian Alliance of America (fraternal); four lodges of the Lithuanian Roman Catholic Alliance of America (fraternal); four branches of the Lithuanian Socialist League; three branches of the 3Lovers of the Fatherland Society (cultural); and one branch of the Auskra (Dawn) Society (students' aid and general educational society).

    Only five of the clubs are of a political character.

    The largest number (fourteen) of non-Catholic societies are located in the West Side or McCormick colony. The largest number (ten) of Catholic organizations are located in the Bridgeport colony. The largest number (three) of political organizations are in the 18th Street colony.

    The number of public Lithuanian institutions and professionals are as follows: Seven churches; one convent; eight schools (one non-Catholic, and seven Catholic); three halls (one non-Catholic, and two Catholic); one astronomical observatory; one library; four periodicals. Eight medical doctors; one dentist; one attorney; twelve priests; one commercial artist; four building contractors; seven mid-wives; one judge; six policemen; and one constable.

    4

    There are four hundred forty-three Lithuanian business men in Chicago. They are located in the following colonies: one hundred twelve in Town of Lake; one hundred ten in Bridgeport; seventy in the 18th Street colony; twenty-one on the North Side; thirty-seven in the West Side or McCormick colony; fifteen in the 47th Street and Wentworth Avenue colony; fifteen in South Chicago; eleven in Melrose Park; eighteen in Kensington; nine in West Pullman; six in Roseland; and nineteen in Grant Works (Cicero, Ill.).

    Thirty of the Lithuanian business men own two or more business establishments. Altogether, there are five hundred four Lithuanian business establishments in Chicago. They are classified as follows: one hundred eighty saloons; eighty-eight food stores; thirty-two barber shops; seventeen tailor shops; fourteen steamship agencies; ten printing shops; eleven cigar and confectionary stores; eleven dairy stores; eleven wagon renting services; thirteen real estate agencies; ten photo studios; nine clothing stores; six book stores; six cleaning and dyeing shops; five musical instrument stores; seven shoe-repair shops; 5six shoe stores; five men's furnishings stores; seven insurance (fire) agencies; six undertakers; seven bakery shops; four plumbing shops; four cigar factories; five bath houses; four furniture stores; two watch and jewelry stores; three hardware stores; two general stores; two livery stables; four drug stores; one bank; one postal sub-station; six notaries public; one coal yard; one ice cream parlor; one picnic grove; one baseball park; and one blacksmith.

    The results of statistical surveys of individual Chicago Lithuanian colonies were published in previous issues of the Lietuva (Lithuania). Today, we are publishing the combined results of all these surveys, ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2, II B 1 c 1, II B 2 d 2, II A 3 a, II B 1 a, II B 2 a, II B 2 c, II B 2 f, II A 1, II D 1, III A, III C
  • Lietuva -- June 24, 1910
    [The Laisvoji Mintis Is Published]

    Beginning with its next number, the Laisvoji Mintis will be published in Chicago. It will be printed by the Lietuva Press. We are not mistaken when we call this periodical the best Lithuanian monthly magazine of all those that we have because of the importance and sincerity of the articles contained in it. However, the Lithuanians should not forget that the publication of such a periodical is costly, therefore, its life and prosperity will depend not only on compliments but more on support.

    Beginning with its next number, the Laisvoji Mintis will be published in Chicago. It will be printed by the Lietuva Press. We are not mistaken when we call this periodical ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 2