The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Lietuva -- October 16, 1908
    Let Us Help Our Students by Joining the Ausra Society

    Much has been written in our newspapers about the great importance of assisting our students. The time has now arrived when we should change from mere words to actual deeds. Most Lithuanian-Americans are members of the poverty-stricken working class. However, there are quite a number of Lithuanians in every Lithuanian-American colony who are more or less wealthy. It is known that the individual fortunes of some Lithuanians total several tens of thousands of dollars. These Lithuanians would not experience any hardship if they joined the Ausra Society (Students' Aid Society), because the membership dues of the society are only twenty-five cents per month, or a total of three dollars per year. If all these wealthy Lithuanians would join the society it would be a very big step forward in the intellectual development of our people; it would benefit our nationality to an immense degree, because the present number of our students would then be increased many times.

    2

    We all know that our people have the scornful habit of looking upon educated people with indifference. We are paying a very high price for this bad habit; it would be much cheaper for us if we were all members of the Ausra Society. That bad habit of indifference is keeping our people in the depths of darkness, slavery, and exploitation.

    At present our greatest need is for educators, literary men and women, medical doctors, and all kinds of merchants. Without educators we are unable to learn about the miracles of science, the mysteries and beauties of nature, etc. Without literary men and philologists we cannot become acquainted with the beauty and richness of our language. A shortage of doctors causes many of our people to die prematurely. A shortage of merchants make it possible for our people to be exploited by, and for the benefit of, foreigners; it is common knowledge that business men of other nationalities find a very profitable field among the Lithuanians. We are short of educated Lithuanians in all walks of life. Therefore, is it not time for us to get busy and fill this shortage?

    3

    We are members of one of the smallest nationalities of the world. However, our nationality is not so small in numbers that it must necessarily be allowed to die out and become absorbed by other nationalities. A number of nations, some numerically smaller than ours, are getting along very nicely. For example, take Bulgaria with a population of 2,400,000; Denmark with 2,500,000; Sweden with 2,600,000; and Greece with 2,500,000. All these nations enjoy their own independent governments, schools, institutions of higher learning, and they all have many educated people. These nations fought for their existence in much the same manner as the Lithuanians are now doing, and they succeeded in throwing off foreign yokes; now they are their own masters. We Lithuanians, also, can succeed in gaining those lofty heights, but only with the aid of a large group of educated people. we can march forward and attain a happier and greater future only by means of intellectual development, which banishes all darkness and all powers of exploitation.

    We are fully aware of the fact that there are many inimical forces among other nationalities, who purposely impede our efforts to reach a higher level of civilization; these sinister forces are doing everything within their power 4to keep us in darkness as long as possible, because they depend upon our darkness for their welfare and prosperity. It is our duty not only to defend ourselves from these forces, but also to wage war against them with the weapon of intellectual development until we are victorious; we can do this by assisting our students and by taking full advantage of opportunities to educate ourselves.

    The Ausra Society, a students' aid society, was established in December, 1901, by a group of prominent Lithuanians of Chicago who understood the value of educated people and their necessity in Lithuanian life. The aims and by-laws of the Ausra Society are as follows:

    Purpose

    The purpose of the Ausra Society is to assist in a financial and advisory capacity worthy young Lithuanian college students, and in this manner create a Lithuanian intelligentsia in all branches of learning except religion.

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    The Ausra Society hopes to achieve this end not only by means of its own resources, but with the help of all Lithuanians who will support the Ausra students' fund by means of various gifts and contributions.

    Assistance

    1. Students of sculpture, music, science, philology, etc., who will be unable to earn a living immediately after graduation, shall be assisted in preference to students of other branches of learning. Women students shall have a priority over men students. Those who have been banished from the Fatherland and those who have suffered in any way on account of their nationality shall have a priority over students who are attending school in the Fatherland.

    2. Assistance shall not be given to students of religion.

    3. Boys and girls who possess talent in any trade can receive assistance from the Ausra Society to continue the development of their talents.

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    4. Those applicants for assistance who have shown their loyalty to Lithuanianism with deeds or in any other suitable manner, shall have a priority over all other applicants.

    5. All financial assistance received by students from the society shall be made in the form of a loan and not as a donation; students who receive money from the society are to refund the money to the society as soon as possible after the completion of their education; this refund may be made either in cash or with worthy deeds for Lithuanianism, such as important writings, etc.

    Supplement 1) The importance and value of the deeds or writings of graduates who had been assisted by the Ausra Society will be decided by a committee elected for that purpose by the members of the society.

    Supplement 2) If any student, while receiving aid from the society, fails to perform at least one worthy deed for the benefit of Lithuanianism in any of the fields of science, art, literature, or national activity, then the society may decide to discontinue all further assistance to such a student.

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    Supplement 3) It is desired that all students who complete their education with the aid of the Ausra Society, establish permanent homes in Lithuania and work there for the uplift of the Lithuanian nation. However, circumstances will not permit all graduates to do this. For that reason, the society does not make this a compulsory requirement.

    All students who desire assistance must make their applications at least six months in advance so that officials of the society may have ample time in which to investigate the character of every applicant.

    Resources

    1. Both men and women may become members of the Ausra Society.

    2. Members pay an initiation fee of one dollar, and monthly dues of twenty-five cents. The initiation fee may be paid at one time or in partial payments.

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    3. Members who contribute a sum of one hundred seventy-five dollars or more at one time, are freed from the payment of all monthly dues.

    4. The rights of both men and women are equal.

    5. Lithuanians who are living in Europe may also join the Ausra Society; they shall pay their dues in accordance with the following money exchange values: One American dollar is to be equivalent to one Russian ruble, three German marks, five French francs, or four British shillings.

    Honorary Members

    Any person who performs an outstanding deed for the welfare of the Ausra Society may be declared an honorary member of the society.

    Branches

    The Ausra Society is not a local organization; it has branches all over the 9United States. Branches of the Ausra Society also may be established in Europe and elsewhere.

    All the branches of the Ausra Society enjoy full autonomy. All membership dues collected by the branches are sent to the supreme treasurer of the society; all membership lists, together with a financial statement of each member, are sent to the supreme financial secretary of the society.

    Eight hundred copies of various books have been donated by Lithuanian-Americans to the Ausra Society. A catalogue and price lists of these books has been published; a copy will be mailed to anyone upon request. Those who purchase books from the Ausra Society are performing very useful deeds; they are contributing financially to the students' aid fund.

    The present national officers of the Ausra Society are as follows: Mrs. J. T. Zelvis, M. D., president, 1 Church St., Plymouth, Pa.; J. Sernas (Joseph Adomaitis), secretary, 3252 S. Halsted St., Chicago, Ill.; P. Mikolainis, financial secretary, P. O. Box 62, New York, N. Y.; Dr. John Sliupas, treasurer, 1419 N. Maine Ave., Scranton, Pa.

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    A branch of the Ausra Society should be organized in every Lithuanian colony in America. A copy of the by-laws of the society may be secured from the financial secretary.

    By P. Mikolainis

    Much has been written in our newspapers about the great importance of assisting our students. The time has now arrived when we should change from mere words to actual deeds. ...

    Lithuanian
    I A 1 a, II B 1 e, III B 2, I A 1 d, I D 1 a, I B 4, III H, I C, IV, I C, I C, I C
  • Lietuva -- October 30, 1908
    Commemorate Birthday of Simonas Daukantas

    Last Sunday, Oct. 25, the local Simonas Daukantas Society held its fifteenth annual commemoration of the birthday of Simonas Daukantas (1793-1864), famous Lithuanian historian, at the Freiheit Turner Hall, 3417 So. Halstod St.

    In the past, all commemorations started with a street parade. This year there was no parade. Chicago Lithuanians assembled in the Freiheit Turner Hall at 4:00 P.M., when a long and interesting program of orations, songs, recitations, and music began. The celebration was started by A. Bijanskas, president of the Simonas Daukantas Society. He explained the purpose and significance of the gathering and introduced the next speaker.

    The first speaker of the occasion was attorney F. P. Bradchulis. His main 2topic was love of our fatherland. He advocated the use and preservation of the Lithuanian language among our people in America. He described his impressions of Lithuania, where he spent his vacation last summer. He stated that a spectacular change has taken place in Lithuania since the Lithuanians regained the freedom of their press in 1904. The people in Lithuania are now very active in an effort to regain their full cultural and political rights. The Poles, who have been persecuting Lithuanians for centuries, are now being denounced in Lithuania as the greatest enemies of the Lithuanian race. Attorney Bradchulis urged the Lithuanians in America to remain true to their nationality, perpetuate their national unity, and never forget the holy land of Lithuania, which is covered with the blood of our forefathers.

    The second speaker was A. Olis (Olsevskis), publisher of the Lietuva. He spoke about Lithuanian Socialists; how they are fighting against people 3who are just as poor as they are, and how they fail to reach and harm the real capitalists. He explained how the present misery of the masses is due not to capitalists, but to drunkedness and laziness; people who make an effort to improve their living and to possess wealth always succeed. He said that modern Socialists promise the people a heaven on earth only with words and not with deeds; Lithuanian Socialists, especially, have drifted away from the real principles and tactics of Socialism in the same manner as our priests, who drifted away from the principles of the Catholic religion. He also asserted that our priests, instead of teaching morality and brotherly love, antagonize brother against brother and fill the hearts of the people with hatred.

    A choral group of the Birute Singing and Dramatic Society sang the following Lithuanian songs: 1. "Ant Kalno Karklai Siubavo" (The Willows on the Hill Were Swinging); 2. "Kur Namas Mus" (There Where Our Home is Located);

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    3. "Noriu Miego" (I Am Sleepy); 4. "Ko Liudi Putineli" (Why Are You Sad, Little Tree); 5. "Eina Garsas Nuo Rubeziaus" (An Echo From the Border); 6. "Oi Tu Jieva" (Oh, You Eve!). The choral group was directed by K. Strumskis, successor to Mikas Petrauskas who left for Lithuania a few months ago.

    Miss Aldona Karalius recited a Lithuanian poem about the Nemunas (Niemen). River in Lithuania, and sang a song entitled "Sudiev Lietuva" (Good-bye Lithuania). Mrs. P. Karalius recited a Lithuanian poem entitled "Delko Ten Zmoniu Didis Buris Stovi?" (Why is a Large Crowd of People Standing There?).

    A Lithuanian orchestra, under the leadership of J. Keturakis, played an overture entitled "Philadelphia," and an extract from the opera "Martha."

    5

    At the conclusion of the program Mr. Bijanskas delivered a short talk. He advised the Lithuanians to improve their conduct at social functions. He said Lithuanians should observe strict silence during the progress of a program, the same as they do when in church. He mentioned the fiftieth anniversary of the birthday of Dr. Vincas Kudirka (1858-1899), famous Lithuanian writer and author of the Lithuanian national anthem "Lietuva Tevyne Musu" (Lithuania, Our Fatherland). He asked the audience for contributions to a fund to publish the literary works of Kudirka. Two young Lithuanian girls, Miss Laukis and Miss Jonaitis, passed among the audience and collected a total of $7.40. This money was later turned over to the Lovers of the Fatherland Society, which is in charge of the fund for the publication of the literary works of Kudirka.

    In spite of rainy weather a capacity crowd attended the commemoration.

    Last Sunday, Oct. 25, the local Simonas Daukantas Society held its fifteenth annual commemoration of the birthday of Simonas Daukantas (1793-1864), famous Lithuanian historian, at the Freiheit Turner Hall, 3417 ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 3 a, II B 1 d, II B 1 a, II B 1 e, II B 2 g, I B 1, I B 4, III C, I C, I E
  • Lietuva -- November 06, 1908
    To Commemorate the Fiftieth Birthday of Kudirka L. of F. Society Will Publish His Works

    J. Gabrys, world famous Lithuanian writer, suggested in a recent issue of the Lietuva that we commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Vincas Kudirka (1858-1899), by publishing all his literary works. This suggestion has been enthusiastically accepted by the Lovers of the Fatherland Society, which has three chapters in Chicago. The society has decided not only to publish all the literary works of Kudirka, but also to hold Kudirka Birthday Parties all over the United States on the day of his birth, December 31. All branches of the society are urged to organize and hold such parties. Although the day is still two months away, nevertheless, decisions have already been made in the principal Lithuanian colonies in the United States to commemorate Kudirka's birthday with appropriate ceremonies and exercises.

    2

    In Chicago, where there are three large lodges of the Lovers of the Fatherland Society, efforts are being made to unite all or at least a majority of the Lithuanian societies to celebrate the event in unity on New Year's Day. Several other Lithuanian societies in Chicago, such as the Farmers of Lithuania Society and the Simonas Daukantas Society, are already working energetically toward that end. At the annual observance of the birthday of Daukantas by the latter society, held on October 25, Mr. A. Bijanskas, president, urged Lithuanians to unite in the celebration of the fiftieth birthday of Kudirka. At his suggestion $7.40 was collected at that gathering and sent to the Lovers of the Fatherland Society to assist in the publication of the works of Kudirka.

    In Boston, all the Lithuanian societies have already united to celebrate the jubilee of Kudirka in a united fashion. According to our newspapers similar plans are also being made in other Lithuanian-American colonies, such as in New York, Philadelphia, Waterbury (Conn.), Cleveland, 3Makanoy City (Pa.), Lawrence (Mass.), and Scranton (Pa.). Such united enthusiasm in regard to a hero of our race is very praiseworthy. This is probably the first time that Lithuanian-Americans, who are scattered all over the United States, have united in the observance of an important event of our nationality.

    In an article about the fiftieth jubilee of Kudirka in the Tevyne (The Fatherland, a Lithuanian weekly published in New York), Mr. Artojas suggests that December 31, 1908, the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Kudirka, be declared a national Lithuanian holiday in order that Lithuanians all over the world night remind themselves of the great deeds of Kudirka and his unbounded love for, and attachment to our Fatherland. That is a very fine suggestion and should be materialized. It would serve to demonstrate, better than anything else, the advancement 4of our people in the intellectual and patriotic fields.

    Dr. Vincas Kudirka was born in Lithuania on December 31, 1858 and died on November 16, 1899. He is the author of the words and music of the Lithuanian national anthem "Lietuva Tevyne Musu" (Lithuania Our Fatherland). He spent his entire life in unceasing activities for the intellectual uplift and racial consciousness of our people. Unquestionably, he is very worthy of all the honor that is being bestowed upon him.

    The Lovers of the Fatherland Society (Tevynes Myletoju Draugija), which has assumed the responsibility of publishing the literary works of Kudirka and of organizing his Birthday Parties all over the United States, is a fast growing society. Six months ago this society had only $344 in its treasury; today it has over $700. The society has 5twenty-six branches all over the United States, and a total member-ship of 411 patriotic Lithuanians. It is playing a very important role in the cultural uplift of our nation.

    The Lovers of the Fatherland Society has appointed Joseph Gabrys, world famous Lithuanian writer and patriot, to collect the literary works of Kudirka. Mr. Gabrys has moved from his home in Paris, France, to Tilsit, Germany, the scene of Kudirka's literary activities, and is already collecting his writings. Judging by the wonderful support which the society is receiving from the Lithuanian public, it appears that we will not have to wait very long for the published works of Kudirka.

    J. Gabrys, world famous Lithuanian writer, suggested in a recent issue of the Lietuva that we commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Vincas Kudirka (1858-1899), by publishing all ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 1 e
  • Lietuva -- November 06, 1908
    Lovers of the Fatherland Society

    The summer months are gone, and now colder weather and shorter days are here; picnics and other summer recreational activities have ceased.

    The beautiful and happy months of summer always diminish indoor social and cultural activities; only a very small percentage of the members of our various societies and clubs attend meetings. Now that the summer season has passed our societies are manifesting greater activity. We all should take full advantage of the colder weather and longer evenings by reading newspapers and educational books, which are available in the libraries of a number of Lithuanian societies that are interested in the educational uplift of our people.

    Therefore, brother Lithuanians, let us become interested in our intellectual development; join a Lithuanian educational society and after a number of months we shall we greatly pleased with the fruit of our efforts.

    One of the outstanding Lithuanian societies in Chicago is the Lovers of the 2Fatherland Society. The sole purpose of this society is to promote the intellectual development of our people. Membership dues are only sixty cents per year. The society does not assist the members in sickness or at death; instead, it provides mental nourishment to the healthy, living body. That is, it publishes the literary works of our greatest writers and distributes them without charge to all members, and to Lithuanians who cannot afford to pay for them.

    The society is growing very fast in Chicago. It has three lodges here with about one hundred member each. The 22nd lodge of the society holds regular monthly meetings on the second Sunday of each month at the Ruigis hall, 3301 So. Morgan St. The next meeting will be held on Sunday, November 8. It is very important for all members to be present at this meeting, because the latest publication of the society, a Lithuanian text book on the subject of mathematics, will be distributed to all members in good standing. Any Lithuanian can learn mathematics from this book without the aid of a teacher.

    By Peter Zemaitis.

    The summer months are gone, and now colder weather and shorter days are here; picnics and other summer recreational activities have ceased. The beautiful and happy months of summer always ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 1 d, II B 1 e
  • Lietuva -- December 04, 1908
    While Honoring the Dead Let Us Not Forget the Living

    Our people in Chicago and other parts of the United States have supported many worthy causes, such as the Paris Exposition, the relief for political prisoners, and the uprising in Russia. Now we are supporting the plan to publish the literary works of Kudirka; we are supporting a number of newspapers and periodicals; and we are building and maintaining many churches. During the past twenty-five years we have contributed large sums of money for the above causes, and these contributions were made almost entirely by members of the working class.

    This year we are making preparations to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Dr. Vincas Kudirka, world-famous Lithuanian writer and patriot, who was born December 31, 1858 and died November 16, 1899. However, this year marks a still greater event - the twenty-fifty anniversary of the founding of the first Lithuanian newspaper, the Ausra (The Dawn), 2which was established in Tilsit, Prussian Lithuania, by Dr. John Pasanias and Dr. John Sliupas. We must not forget these Lithuanian patriots, especially Dr. Sliupas, who is also credited with many important achievements among the Lithuanians in America. He was the first to segregate the Lithuanians from the Poles in America: he was the first to organize and found the Lithuanians Alliance of America; and he was the first to start the working class movement among Lithuanian-Americans. Dr. Sliupas also played an important role in the lawsuit between the Lietuva and Rev. Kraucuanas, pastor of St. George's Lithuanian Roman Catholic Church in Chicago.

    Therefore, while honoring Kudirka and other departed Lithuanian heroes, let us also honor our living heroes.

    Our people in Chicago and other parts of the United States have supported many worthy causes, such as the Paris Exposition, the relief for political prisoners, and the uprising in ...

    Lithuanian
    I E, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 e, II D 1, III C, III A, IV
  • Lietuva -- January 08, 1909
    Chicago Lithuanians Honor Kudirka (Summary)

    The Lithuanians of Chicago commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Dr. V. Kudirka (1858-1899), Lithuanian patriot and author of the Lithuanian national anthem, on January 1, at the hall of the McCormick Worker's Club, on Blue Island Avenue, between Leavitt Street and Oakley Avenue. It was the largest and most impressive celebration ever held by the Lithuanians of Chicago. Preparations for the event were being made for several months by the Lovers of the Fatherland Society, the Farmers of Lithuania Society, and other Chicago Lithuanian societies.

    B. K. Balutis (famous Chicago Lithuanian attorney who became editor of the Lietuva in 1918. After the World War he moved to Lithuania and 2became the Lithuanian ambassador to the United States), who acted as master of ceremonies, called the meeting to order and explained the purpose of the gathering - to honor Kudirka. After his talk he called upon the choral group of the Birute Music and Dramatic Society to open the program by singing the American and Lithuanian national anthems.

    The hall was packed to capacity with Lithuanians of all religions and political beliefs. A large artistic photograph of Kudirka, decorated with a green wreath, stood on the stage. Smaller copies of this photograph were distributed to all those who attended the commemoration.

    P. L. Sernas (editor of the Lietuva), who was a close friend and associate of Kudirka, delivered the first oration of the evening. He spoke on the importance of Kudirka's literary contributions to the Lithuanian nation.

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    His address was very interesting and well-received by the audience. However, he precipitated some ill feeling among the audience, which contained many Catholics, by stating that the years which Kudirka had spent in a Catholic seminary in preparation for the priesthood were a waste of time.

    After Mr. Sernas' address, Anthony Pocius, youthful but talented and very promising Lithuanian musician, entertained the audience with a few numbers of the piano. His best numbers were "Varpelis" (Little Bell) and "Sudiev" (Adieu). Mr. Pocius is a former pupil of Mikas Petrauskas, famous Lithuanian musician and composer.

    Dr. A. K. Rutkauskas was the second speaker. He explained the social and economic conditions under which Kudirka conducted his literary activities. Like the first speaker, he also introduced a religious note 4in his talk. He stated that the cultural uplift of the Lithuanian nation is impossible without the aid of our Catholics; anyone who attempts to carry on any cultural activities outside the sphere of our Catholics can only do harm to our nation.

    The next speaker was A. Zmuidinavicius (Zemaitis), famous Lithuanian sculptor and artist who is in Chicago on a visit from Lithuania. He spoke on Kudirka's place in the history of Lithuanian art. Mr. Zmuidinavicius (Zemaitis), who is president of the Art Society of Lithuania, was honored by being the conductor of the first Lithuanian art exhibit, which took place in Vilna, Lithuania.

    The last speaker was B. K. Balutis, who lauded Kudirka in a long and impressive talk. He asked the Lithuanians to support the efforts of 5the Lovers of the Fatherland Society to publish the literary works of Kudirka. Mr. Balutis displayed exceptional ability as an orator. He is one of the few really great orators among Lithuanian-Americans.

    The Lithuanians of Chicago commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the birth of Dr. V. Kudirka (1858-1899), Lithuanian patriot and author of the Lithuanian national anthem, on January 1, at the ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, II B 1 e, II B 1 a, I F 4, III C, III H, IV
  • Lietuva -- October 08, 1909
    Famous Lithuanian Writer to Reside in Chicago

    The famous Lithuanian short story writer, Mr. Sliburis, came to Chicago a few days ago and plans to reside here permanently. Like most of the great Lithuanian leaders, Mr. Sliburis is a self-made man, that is, he did not acquire his education in school, but by actual experience in life, while living among the common Lithuanian people.

    The famous Lithuanian short story writer, Mr. Sliburis, came to Chicago a few days ago and plans to reside here permanently. Like most of the great Lithuanian leaders, Mr. Sliburis ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 e
  • Lietuva -- April 07, 1911
    An Appeal to Dramatists

    We are appealing to the dramatists who have written any kind of comedy or tragedy, of not less than three acts. Will you be kind enough to send them to us, that we may produce them even though they are in manuscript. If any one has such a play, please inform us of its subject, the scenery. needed, the persona, and the production charges if loaned by us.

    Mrs. Mare Dundulis

    2131 Columbia St.

    Chicago, Ill.

    We are appealing to the dramatists who have written any kind of comedy or tragedy, of not less than three acts. Will you be kind enough to send them to ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 e
  • Lietuva -- April 21, 1911
    The Lithuanian Salesmen's Association (Summary)

    In the local Lithuanian newspapers, very seldom can one see mention of the Lithuanian Salesmen's Association, although it was organized in 1907, and at present has fifty members.

    The purpose of this organization is to unite all the Lithuanian salesmen--to assist them in times of sickness--to help them find better jobs. The Lithuanians can speak several languages. Why should they work in the Stock Yards, etc., when they can get better jobs in places where people who speak several languages are always in demand. Join our organization; we will help you find a better job, one with better pay than you are receiving in a factory.

    This organization participates in cultural activity. It has supported the publication of the books of Dr. V. Kuditka. This organization has joined the Chicago Lithuanian Societies Association for the purpose of building a 2Lithuanian hall in Chicago.

    One of the members.

    In the local Lithuanian newspapers, very seldom can one see mention of the Lithuanian Salesmen's Association, although it was organized in 1907, and at present has fifty members. The purpose ...

    Lithuanian
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 3, II B 1 e, III B 2, II D 8
  • Lietuva -- October 04, 1912
    The Lithuanian Newspapermen's Conference

    The following newspapers were represented in the third Lithuanian newspapermen's conference: Vienybē Lietuvninku, Katalikas, Lietuva, Tevynē, Darbininku Viltis, Laisvoji Mintis, and Dagis.

    The conference was held in Chicago. The meetings began Friday, September 27, at the Bismarck Hotel.

    After the meeting of the Press Society had been called to order, it was brought to president J. M. Tananevičius' attention that the following newspapers were participating in the conference:

    1. From the editorial board of the Lietuva: L. Šernas and B. K. Balutis; representing the publishers: A. Olševskis and J. Hertmanavičius.

    2. From the editorial board of the Katalikas: P. Brandukas and J. Viskoška; 2representing the publishers: J. M. Tananevičius and S. Tananevicius.

    3. Representing the editors and administration of Vienybē Lietuvninku, J. Širvydas.

    4. From Laisvoji Mintis, the editor and publisher, Dr. J. Šliupas.

    5. From the editorial board of the Tēvynē, its specially authorized correspondent, K. Jurgelionis.

    6. From the Dagis, P. Brandukas.

    A. Kvederas, reporter for the Kova, also presented his credentials at this time.

    The editorial office of Draugas announced that, because of various reasons, Draugas could not participate, but asked that the resolutions of the conference 3be sent to it.

    The following were elected as officers of the conference: J. M. Tananevičius, president; J. Viskoska, and K. Jurgelionis, secretaries.

    The question of discussing by-laws, a project which had been put off until this meeting, was postponed to the end of the conference. A discussion of various problems followed, in the following sequence:

    1. It was decided that, to put our scientific and technical terminology in order, the newspapers would use the international terminology, after making it suitable to the Lithuanian language. To put in order the American-Lithuanian terminology (names of institutions, officials, and the political field) a special committee was elected, including Dr. J. Šliupas, L. Šernas, and K. Jurgelionis (with Šliupas acting as the responsible committee chairman)....

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    2. The matter of miraculous doctors and misleading advertising. The thought was expressed that the most successful way of abolishing these advertisements would be: a) to have the government forbid the printing of such advertisements, and b) to strive as much as possible to explain to the people, more often, that they should not believe such advertisements. Since the National American Medical Association is at present working on both these suggestions and since the Lithuanian doctors have already made a beginning in organizing a branch of that Association with their Lithuanian Doctors Alliance, this matter was relegated to our doctors' organization. The newspapers promise to aid them and print their articles in reference to this matter.

    3. The desire that all newspapers and publishing houses would exchange copies of their publications was expressed.

    4. Problems regarding enlightenment.

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    5. Statistical matters.

    The members of the Statistics Committee, K. V. Račkauskas, with a written report, and J. O. Širvydas, verbally, announced that they had collected much material from various sources in their effort to put in order the statistics regarding Lithuanians and their activities in America but that it is insufficient as yet and, therefore, too early to be compiled. K. Jurgelionis also announced that he had collected much statistical material for the proposed encyclopedia, which could be used in compiling the statistical reports.....

    6. The centralization of various organizations.

    7. It was decided that the officers of the Press Society continue their efforts to draw to this newspapermen's organization those newspapers which, up to the present time, have not belonged to it.

    6

    8. Problems of the theater.

    Since the presentation of theatrical plays is a large influence in educating the people, it is desirable that our newspapers turn as much attention as they can to theatrical matters. It is advisable that the lovers of the stage associate themselves with the Teatras, a periodical devoted to theatrical matters, in which better theatrical plays could appear. In the meantime, a special committee was elected to make up a list of all the better plays which it would be advisable to present on the stage and to publish that list in the newspapers. J. D. Širvydas and K. Jurgelionis were elected to the committee.

    9. The establishment of evening schools.

    The meeting advises the newspapers to explain to the people from time to time, and especially in the fall, how they can secure such schools from the city government.

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    10. On the matter of temperance.

    The newspapers are in accord with the propagation of temperance and express the desire that the Lithuanian doctors help the newspapers in this matter by the preparation of suitable articles.

    11. The conference is in accord with the movement that Lithuanians settling here concern themselves with procuring citizenship papers and that they participate in the political activity of this country.

    12. The question being raised as to how much the Lithuanian newspapers should concern themselves with this country's politics, it was decided that the newspapers, each according to its convictions, should concern themselves with politics as much as space permits.

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    13. The opinion was expressed that it is desirable to support Lithuanian commerce and industry and to urge and accustom Lithuanians to them as much as possible.

    14. It is advisable to support the learning of trades and to explain their benefits to the people.

    15. For elevating and caring for our literature and authors, it is desirable that Lithuanian writers would join into one organization, which would be similar to a section of the Press Society.

    16. The meeting expressed the general opinion that it is advisable to support a Lithuanian colonization movement if such a colonization plan is conducted honestly by conscientious individuals.....

    17. The conference happily observed that the desire expressed at the last newspapermen's conference in regard to organizing Lithuanian students is 9being at least partially fulfilled.....

    20. The question of a Central Library.

    It is desirable that a place be found where there could be stored all the newspapers, writings, books, and publications--not only in the Lithuanian but also in other languages--which in one way or another concern the Lithuanian nation and life. In other words, to found a Lituanica Library which could be used by Lithuanian-American writers, researchers, etc. The founding of a Lituanica in Lithuania is inaccessible to Lithuanian-Americans.....

    The following newspapers were represented in the third Lithuanian newspapermen's conference: Vienybē Lietuvninku, Katalikas, Lietuva, Tevynē, Darbininku Viltis, Laisvoji Mintis, and Dagis. The conference was held in Chicago. The meetings ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, II A 3 d 1, II B 1 e, II B 2 a, III B 1, III B 4, I A 3, I B 1, III A, I M, IV