The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- December 17, 1892
    Why we need Stockholders to Publish our Newspaper "Lietuva?"

    Our proposition is this: one man, even if he were the most educated, cannot accomplish as much as a group of people.

    If a newspaper is published by one man, it will not bring to us spiritual benefit, he will publish in the paper what is good for himself only, and very often he makes mistakes. Suppose he dislikes some one, them he will publish all kinds of insults about him, that would bring misunderstandings and troubles, etc.

    When a newspaper is published by stockholders, then there would be no place for private and personal polemics, because stockholders will look and watch that the paper brought spiritual benefit, education, and brotherly unity among us. Such a newspaper would do more good for us, and for our mother country as well.

    The price of one share is only $10.00. We have sold 50 shares, there are 100 shares left.

    If any Lithuanian wants to buy shares of Lietuva, come to office of Lietuva at 567 W. 18th St.

    Stockholders.

    Our proposition is this: one man, even if he were the most educated, cannot accomplish as much as a group of people. If a newspaper is published by one man, ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, II A 2, I A 3
  • Lietuva -- December 24, 1892
    First Grocery Store

    Mr.J. Grigas, 134 W.15th St. opened a grocery store.We are glad to hear that Lithuanians are going into business and do not yield to others.

    To our brother Grigas we are wishing good success. He ought to be supported by all Lithuanians.

    Remember brothers, Germans and Jews will not support us, they will not buy from Catholics, will go half a mile to their countrymen. Therefore we ought to take an example from other nations,by doing that we will obtain a better livelihood.

    Mr.J. Grigas, 134 W.15th St. opened a grocery store.We are glad to hear that Lithuanians are going into business and do not yield to others. To our brother Grigas we ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2, I C
  • Lietuva -- December 24, 1892
    Meeting of Lietuva Stockholders

    December 27, at 7 o'clock Tuesday evening, a meeting will be held by stockholders in the office of Lietuva, 567 W. 18th St.

    We are inviting all Lithuanians who wish welfare to our nation, also bring along other Lithuanians, brothers who are willing to help us in this important cause.

    Stockholders.

    December 27, at 7 o'clock Tuesday evening, a meeting will be held by stockholders in the office of Lietuva, 567 W. 18th St. We are inviting all Lithuanians who wish ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, II A 2
  • Lietuva -- December 24, 1892
    Invention

    A Lithuanian, P. Z. Krulis, living in Chicago, obtained a patent from Washington, D. C. for his new invention for coupling railway cars. It is very practical to use.

    A Lithuanian, P. Z. Krulis, living in Chicago, obtained a patent from Washington, D. C. for his new invention for coupling railway cars. It is very practical to use.

    Lithuanian
    II A 2
  • Lietuva -- April 15, 1893
    About the Chicago Lithuanians

    Lithuanians in Chicago began to show with their activity. Up to this time we used to say that the Lithuanians know only the stockyards. Now we see a few Lithuanians holding city jobs. This is very good, shows that we Lithuanians are just as good as other nationalities.

    We Lithuanians have a political club in Chicago. This club urges Lithuanians to become citizens. When all Lithuanians are citizens then all of us as a mass of people can go to vote, demand official jobs, etc.

    Lithuanians in Chicago began to show with their activity. Up to this time we used to say that the Lithuanians know only the stockyards. Now we see a few Lithuanians ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, II A 2, I F 4
  • Lietuva -- May 13, 1893
    Book Store and Real Estate Business

    Those who want to get books of any kind, come to Antanas Aliszanskas, you will get all kinds of books and for the cheapest prices in America. We have all kinds of pictures, beads, scapulers, anything that is necessary for society and church.

    We also sell lots, buildings, farms, steamship tickets, and we send money to all parts of the world.

    You can get typewriters. You can get catalogs of typewriters by mailing to us fifteen cents.

    A. Olszewski,

    929 W. 33rd St.

    Chicago, Ill.

    Those who want to get books of any kind, come to Antanas Aliszanskas, you will get all kinds of books and for the cheapest prices in America. We have all ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2
  • Lietuva -- June 24, 1893
    The First Lithuanian Hotel

    The first Lithuanian hotel in Chicago is opened by St. Rokosza, 749 W. 18th street. The hotel is very clean and modern, with first class beds; the meals are most delicious, and the prices are reasonable and good beer and whisky are served too.

    There is a large and nice hall where every second Saturday are held dances. Many young Lithuanian men and beautiful girls are coming there to dance and for social entertainment.

    The first Lithuanian hotel in Chicago is opened by St. Rokosza, 749 W. 18th street. The hotel is very clean and modern, with first class beds; the meals are most ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2, III A
  • Lietuva -- June 08, 1895
    The New Lithuanian Business

    We are asking Lithuanians to notice the advertisement in Lietuva of the new Lithuanian business, under the name "The Independent Watch Company.

    105 Brown (S. Sangamon) St.

    Chicago, Ill.

    We are asking Lithuanians to notice the advertisement in Lietuva of the new Lithuanian business, under the name "The Independent Watch Company. 105 Brown (S. Sangamon) St. Chicago, Ill.

    Lithuanian
    II A 2
  • Lietuva -- June 08, 1895
    About the Chicago Lithuanians (Editorial)

    The Chicago Lithuanian community is young. During the last two years they have shown real activity among themselves. We must say, that the Chicago Lithuanians accomplished more than the Lithuanians of any other city, where they had been living for the last few scores of years.

    We have eleven Lithuanian societies, nine societies of men, two societies of women, and a cluster of the Lithuanian Catholic Alliance of America.

    Of those mentioned societies, we have among them three best societies: one is the Simonas Daukantas society which has its own library; society of the Grand Army of the Duke Vytantas, has uniforms and can participate in any parade; and the society of musicians can go on parades, play on concerts and festivals.

    We have eight Lithuanian political clubs organized into the league as a 2result of political activity a few Lithuanians have the city jobs.

    On Bridgeport we have a church and fourteen lots. Now, north side Lithuanians have decided to buy a church for $10,000

    But now in the last few days Lithuanians began to talk about one of the most important organization that should be established among us, the Lithuanian Building and Loan Association. Rev. Kranczunas called a meeting of a few Lithuanians and now they are working on the constitution. When the plans are ready for such organization, the meeting will be called for the final organization of this society.

    Such financial organization is one of the best for Lithuanians. We are living in this country. Why then should we give our money to others? They are making profits and building up their business with our money. Why then cannot we make our money work for us. We are buying buildings, lots, looking for leans. Why then must we pay interest to others, when we can pay it to our-selves?

    3

    Many Lithuanians lost their money in Jewish banks, but the money cannot be lost in a building and loan association.

    This coming Sunday a meeting of this new financing organization will be held. If our Lithuanians want to protect their own money they should come to this meeting, hear the plans and discussions, Join this organization, and help to build the Lithuanian business.

    The Chicago Lithuanian community is young. During the last two years they have shown real activity among themselves. We must say, that the Chicago Lithuanians accomplished more than the Lithuanians ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 2, II B 1 a, II B 2 a, III C, I F 2, I F 4, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- March 14, 1896
    The Chicago Lithuanians Uplifted Their Names (Synopsis)

    As it was stated in the last issue of Lietuva many Lithuanians lost their money in the so-called bank of the Hungarian-Jew Koperl. Then one of the Chicago English newspapers referring to the Lithuanians who lost their money in the said bank,printed a slanderous article about Lithuanians.

    On February 22 a meeting was called and a committee elected to protest against the slander on Lithuanians. The newspaper (The Evening Journal) refused to print our protest, and the next day printed a more slanderous article about Lithuanians.

    For this reason we decided to call a mass meeting to make a protest and form a resolution against that newspaper. The mass meeting was called on March 8 at St. George's church hall. Over two thousand Lithuanians were present.

    There were reporters of all English newspapers in Chicago, even the reporter of the Evening Journal, which printed the slanderous article against Lithuanians. There were also reporters from German, Polish and Swedish newspapers.

    2

    Such prominent speakers were on this mass meeting: Theodore Brentano, a judge of the Superior Court and Eugene Seeger, city statistician.

    Mr. E. Seeger said that no one can tell me better about Lithuanians than myself. The newspaper that blackened your name knows nothing about Lithuanians. You have a great language, its history goes back to the ancient Sanscrit; you have a great history; you were oppressed by the Russian Czar; you love freedom, and America gives you that freedom. Why did that newspaper slander you? Because you are a working people. Do not be ashamed that you are workers; this country is being built by the working people, and you came to help build this great country of America. You people, as children of Abraham Lincoln, do not be ashamed to call yourselves workers.

    Pay no attention to the slanderous newspaper .... a real American would not slander you people. You came to this country because your seeking freedom, and you are making progress in spite of slanderous libel of certain newspapers.

    Judge Brentano said: "I don't think that the newspaper which printed that slanderous article about you Lithuanians, have done it with bad intention. They have done it because they didn't know any better. If the newspaper people were 3here on this mass meeting they would be ashamed of themselves if they could see your intelligent faces.

    "At present there are in Chicago over ten thousand Lithuanians. I am a judge for the last six years, and during these years I never had a Lithuanian in may court on any offense. This proves to you that the Lithuanian are law-abiding citizens. Therefore, no prudent American would slander such people.

    "In your old country the Russian government held you under the oppression; you had no freedom there to work out your own destiny. In this country you have freedom, hold meetings, protest against the injustices done to you, print books and newspapers in your own language, and go forward with civilization in this land of the free.

    "By holding this mass meeting today against the slanderous newspaper, you are doing the same as any prudent and respectable people would have done against such injustice."

    The Lithuanian speakers were Mr. Szernas (his real name is Adomaitis), editor of Lietuva; Mr. P. Donaitis, president of the Lithuanian Political Alliance; A. 4Olszewskis, publisher of Lietuva, and Mr. A. Bijanskis.

    The Lithuanian speakers said the newspaper stated in its slanderous article against Lithuanians that only one Lithuanian in two hundred can read; that the Lithuanians in Chicago are working for only fifty or seventy cents a day, because they are still living like slaves in Europe,where they are working for food only. That there are about 15,000 Lithuanians in the world; that the Lithuanians are semi-civilized, etc.

    Against such a slander we are protesting in this meeting. That there are not 15,000 Lithuanians, but over 4,000,000 Lithuanians who are speaking the Lithuanian language.

    We are asking the slanderous newspaper to take into consideration the following facts: - In Chicago there are over 10,000 Lithuanians; 2,000 of them are tailors by trade and their wages run from $1.50 to $4.00 a day; there are 500 moulders; 400 barbers. The Chicago Lithuanians have twelve mutual benefit societies; eight political clubs, and one strong organization - the Illinois Lithuanian Republican Club. Is it possible for a semi-civilized people to have such a tradesmen and such organizations? And yet that newspaper states that we 5are a barbarous people and know nothing of how to take advantage of this free country of America.

    Therefore we are making this protest against the newspaper - the Evening Journal - for the slanderous article against us.

    On the next day all the Chicago newspapers wrote about this mass meeting. English, German, Polish, Swedish - newspapers of every language - wrote about this protest meeting. Especially the Inter-Ocean newspaper printed word by word the speech of Judge Brentano.

    Now everybody knows that the Lithuanians are not such ignorant people as the said paper described. Even the Evening Journal which printed the slanderous article against us, now after this mass meeting, wrote that the Lithuanians who were present at this protest meeting were clean, well dressed and intelligent people.

    Some of the newspapers even mentioned the past historical events in the history of Lithuania, and about the Lithuanians in America.

    6

    Now, Lithuanians, do not be ashamed to call yourselves Lithuanians. Beware of drinking, gambling and laziness, as some of us are. Read newspapers and books, educate yourselves, show that you are enlightened, but not such ignoramuses, as the paper stated that only one Lithuanian in two hundred can read.

    As it was stated in the last issue of Lietuva many Lithuanians lost their money in the so-called bank of the Hungarian-Jew Koperl. Then one of the Chicago English newspapers ...

    Lithuanian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, III A, I B 1