The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- June 29, 1900
    Lithuanian Graduated in Enginerring Course

    Stanislawas Dowiath, brother of the well-known Lithuanian doctor, Mary Dowiath, graduated from the University of Illinois at Champaign ,June 1st. He received a diploma of engineer. He came with his parents as a student from Vilno Gymnaisum high School. He went to public school and after one year he passed the examination and went to high school. Then he went to the University. Now he came back as engineer.

    Stanislawas Dowiath, brother of the well-known Lithuanian doctor, Mary Dowiath, graduated from the University of Illinois at Champaign ,June 1st. He received a diploma of engineer. He came with his ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 1
  • Lietuva -- October 12, 1900
    The New Lithuanian Doctor

    Andrews Graicziunas has graduated in Chicago in a course in medicine. The Lithuanians ought to be glad to have a Lithuanians doctor. In any sickness they can call the doctor and speak in their own language. When you cannot speak the language even the best doctor cannot explain to you how to take care of yourself in time of sickness.

    Andrews Graicziunas has graduated in Chicago in a course in medicine. The Lithuanians ought to be glad to have a Lithuanians doctor. In any sickness they can call the doctor ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 1, IV
  • Lietuva -- November 21, 1900
    The Lithuanian Lawyer

    The American papers announce that our compatriot, Mr. Franciszkus P. Bradchulis, has passed the bar examination, and on the 12th day of October got permission to practice in the Superior court.

    Mr. P. Bradchulis is 29 years of age; he was very young when he came to Chicago and he was the first Lithuanian to make his abode in Chicago. He showed ability in his studies. He was graduated from a Chicago high school and from the Metropolitan Business College. In 1895 he went to the Lake Forest University to study law, and in 1899 he received a diploma of law.

    As far as we know we think that Mr. Bradchulis is the first Lithuanian law graduate in America.

    The American papers announce that our compatriot, Mr. Franciszkus P. Bradchulis, has passed the bar examination, and on the 12th day of October got permission to practice in the Superior ...

    Lithuanian
    II A 1, IV
  • Lietuva -- March 23, 1906
    Appeal to Lithuanian Organizations, Newspapers and Societies

    The Central Committee of Zinycia (The Temple) will hold a convention for the discussion of various problems. They have decided to invite to this convention the Lithuanian organizations, newspapers, societies, and individuals who are well known because of their activities in the scientific and national field. Not having the addresses of many Lithuanian societies, we have decided to invite them not by letters but through the medium of the press. We hope that the Lithuanian Alliance of America, the Roman-Catholic Alliance of America, the Lovers of Fatherland Society, the Lithuanian Science Society, the newspapers Lietuva,Katalikas (Catholic) Vienybe (Unity), Saule (The Sun), and Zvaigzde (The Star), and all other societies of Chicago and of other cities will send delegates in order to make the convention more important. That will bring benefit to all of us.

    Writers, teachers and other men of science, Just let us know that you are coming; you need no other credentials.

    2

    To avoid unnecessary expenses, the organizations can appoint their delegates from their local branches, the newspapers can appoint their local (Chicago) reporters.

    If any society has no time to elect a delegate, the president or secretary of such a society can be sent.

    The convention will be held on April the 8th, at 1 P. M., at the Northwestern University Settlement, Augusta and Noble streets, Chicago.

    The names of the delegates, organizations, societies and newspapers, must be sent to the Zinycia secretary, M. Januskevicia, 137 Augusta St., Chicago, Ill., before the fourth day of April, so that a list of the delegates could be prepared.

    J. Hertmanavicia, President

    M. M. Januskevicia, Secretary.

    Among the guests we are expecting to have many ladies and American visitors.

    The Central Committee of Zinycia (The Temple) will hold a convention for the discussion of various problems. They have decided to invite to this convention the Lithuanian organizations, newspapers, societies, ...

    Lithuanian
    I D 2 b, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, II A 1, III C, IV
  • Lietuva -- October 26, 1906
    Compatriots!

    At the City Hall examinations will be held for the office of truant officer; there will be two examinations: one in the English language, the other is known as the linguistic examination. One does not need to take both examinations; take either one. Go to the City Hall, Room 400, get an application blank and state which examination you prefer to take; give it to the clerk, and he will notify you when the examination will be given. The salary on this job is $75 per month.

    I wish educated Lithuanians would take this opportunity.

    A. K. Rutkauskas, M. D.

    At the City Hall examinations will be held for the office of truant officer; there will be two examinations: one in the English language, the other is known as the ...

    Lithuanian
    I A 1 a, II A 1, IV
  • Lietuva -- June 12, 1908
    Lithuanian Intelligentsia Organized

    The echoes of a large variety of activities, which are calculated to benefit our nationality and promote our individual welfare, resound in all sections of Chicago. Although these efforts are undoubtedly launched and conducted by sincere and honest persons, nevertheless, it has been noticed that most of them conflict with one another and extend into diverse and opposing channels. A great lack of unity of purpose in our plans is plainly evident. This chaotic state of affairs is due largely to lack of unity and understanding among the members of our intelligentsia, who act as leaders of our people. It is unquestionably the direct cause of much wasted energy and valuable resources. It is also responsible for the prevalence of many vicious rumors and many painful quarrels among the people of our nationality. The breach between the various factions of our nationality is constantly growing wider. It is clear that under such conditions we cannot even hope to make any satisfactory progress.

    2

    However, our position is far from being hopeless. Where there is a will there is always a way, reads an old saying. Unity of action among our people can be brought about by promoting a greater understanding among the members of our intelligentsia, who are our leaders. This highly desirable end could be realized if our leaders would come in contact with each other more frequently, in order to weigh and discuss our common affairs from all angles. Such action would undoubtedly help a great deal in eliminating prejudice, vicious rumors, and foolish quarrels, among our people. It would pave the way for more productive activities. This exchange of ideas and plans by our leaders can be brought about most conveniently by forming an organization of the best educated Lithuanians of Chicago.

    The need for unity has been felt a long time by all members of the Lithuanian intelligentsia of Chicago. Many vital affairs of our nationality, which spring up from time to time, require the united support of all Lithuanians, regardless of political or religious affiliations. This fact has convinced many intelligent 3Lithuanians of Chicago of the necessity to unite.

    Suggestions for an organization of our intelligentsias have been introduced several times at many of our public meetings. Finally, on May 10th, the idea became a reality. The long efforts of F. P. Bradchulis to form such an organization produced gratifying results. On the above mentioned date, an organization was established with twelve distinguished members of our intelligentsia forming the initial membership body. This new organization will be known as the "Lithuanian Circle." It will aim to unite all members of the Lithuanian intelligentsia in Chicago, for the purpose of rendering united support for all important matters pertaining to our nationality. All members of the Lithuanian intelligentsia, regardless of religious, political, or other personal convictions, are eligible for membership.

    At the first meeting of the Lithuanian Circle, a committee of three was elected to prepare the by-laws of the organization. A decision was made to hold a banquet in connection with the next business meeting of the organization, which 4will be held Friday evening, June 12th, at 2001 South Indiana Avenue. At this banquet the matter of adopting the by-laws will be discussed, and permanent officers will be elected. Many matters of vital interest to all members of our intelligentsia in Chicago will be discussed at the meeting. All are invited, without any reservations, to attend.

    We have great hope that our Lithuanian priests and other Lithuanians, who have been engaged in various activities among the non-Lithuanian intelligentsia of Chicago, will not fail to join this most important movement for the benefit of our nationality and general welfare.

    The echoes of a large variety of activities, which are calculated to benefit our nationality and promote our individual welfare, resound in all sections of Chicago. Although these efforts are ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, II A 1
  • Lietuva -- July 24, 1908
    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas Appointed City Health Inspector

    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas, popular Lithuanian physician, was recently appointed as a city health inspector by the Chicago Board of Health. He is the first Lithuanian to hold such a position in Chicago.

    Dr. Graiciunas has been assigned to the childrens’ health section. He will conduct a house to house canvass, and assist families in an advisory capacity regarding the health of their children.

    There is no doubt that Dr. Graiciunas, who is a strong advocator of medical science, will accomplish much good for the people in his new service. His efforts will be devoted mostly to Lithuanian families. It is hoped that our people will take advantage of his advice and services.

    Dr. A. L. Graiciunas, popular Lithuanian physician, was recently appointed as a city health inspector by the Chicago Board of Health. He is the first Lithuanian to hold such a ...

    Lithuanian
    IV, II A 1
  • Lietuva -- July 09, 1909
    Lietuva Reporter to Make Statistical Survey of Chicago Lithuanians

    Beginning with the next issue, the Lietuva will inaugurate a special column under the title Life of Chicago Lithuanians, which will contain a large variety of interesting and educational news matter pertaining to the Lithuanians of Chicago. Material for this column will be gathered by the Lietuva reporter.

    Hitherto, Chicago Lithuanians knew very little about what was going on among them, and it is not at all surprising that many of our people complained that our newspapers made no effort to satisfy the desire of the readers for more news about local Lithuanians. The publisher of 2Lietuva has decided to satisfy this demand of the readers. The Lietuva will gather and print all kinds of news about local Lithuanians in their current events; news about jobs, where and how many Lithuanians are employed, the nature of their work and how much they earn; where and how Chicago Lithuanians live; the number and classification of Chicago Lithuanian business establishments, their investment, expenses and profits; the number of Chicago Lithuanian home owners; the number and location of Lithuanian neighborhoods and groups in Chicago; the total number of Lithuanians living in Chicago and its suburbs. In other words, the column will cover all current events and statistical news about the Lithuanians of Chicago.

    It is not necessary to say much about the value of such news matter to our people, because everybody can readily understand that such information 3is essential for our unity, uplift, and education. When we learn how much and what kind of possibilities we possess, it will be much easier for us to take advantage of them in promoting our welfare.

    The gathering of such news matter is not easy. In order to secure accurate statistics of our people, the co-operation of all Lithuanians, or at least a large part of them, is absolutely necessary. However, the publisher of the Lietuva has bravely assumed this responsibility and believes that in due time our people will be supplied with a variety of complete and accurate statistics pertaining to the Lithuanians of the city of Chicago.

    As mentioned above, besides statistical information, the column will contain all kinds of carefully collected news about current events and other interesting information. A special effort will be made to obtain 4information about jobs; many of our people are now unemployed and are deeply interested in such information.

    Beginning with the next issue, the Lietuva will inaugurate a special column under the title Life of Chicago Lithuanians, which will contain a large variety of interesting and educational news ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, II B 2 d 1, I B 3 c, II A 1, II A 2, II D 8, I C, I H
  • Lietuva -- July 23, 1909
    First Chicago Lithuanians Settled on North Side

    The first Lithuanian colony in the city of Chicago was formed on the North Side. Some Lithuanians have lived there for about thirty years, or since the Chicago Fire.

    It is difficult to locate the boundaries of the North Side Lithuanian neighborhood because the Lithuanian population is scattered over a wide area. The corner of Paulina Street and Wabansia Avenue is usually referred to as the center and most interesting part of the Lithuanian community, because about eighteen or twenty Lithuanian families lived in one building there. A large number of Lithuanians live in the neighborhood of Noble Street and Wabansia Avenue, but, this group is composed largely of Polonized Lithuanians, who came here from the city of Vilna, capital of Lithuania.

    A Lithuanian parish, the St. Michael Archangel parish, was organized here only three years ago. Rev. N. Lukosius is the pastor. About 2,000 to 2,500 Lithuanians attend this Lithuanian church, which is located at 1644 West Wabansia Avenue.

    2

    A large part, probably a majority, of the Lithuanians living on the North Side are Polonized Lithuanians. Some members of this group still admit that they are Lithuanians, but they mostly speak Polish among themselves, attend the Polish Holy Trinity church, and do all their shopping in Polish stores.

    It is estimated that there are about five or six thousand Lithuanians living on the North Side. About 2,000 attend the Lithuanian church, while about 1,000 do not attend any church, and about 3,000 are Polonized Lithuanians. Although this is a large Lithuanian population, there are nevertheless, very few Lithuanian business establishments on the North Side. Apparently Lithuanians do not patronize their own merchants; instead, they support the Poles and Jews.

    Altogether there are eighteen Lithuanian business establishments on the North Side. They are as follows: Two meat markets, one owned by Mr. Sliuza, the other by Mr. Nauseda; one grocery store, owned by Mr. Kareiva; one confectionery store, by Mr. T. Grigalis; Mr. P. M. Kaitis sells men's furnishings, steamship tickets, real estate, and operates a printing shop; seven Lithuanian owned 3saloons; six tailor shops, by Mr. Dovydaitis, Mr. Buividas, Mr. Sakalas, Mr. Zitkus, Mr. Paulikaitis, and Mr. Antanavicius.

    About two-thirds of the Lithuanian workers on the North Side are tailors. A large number of Lithuanians are employed in the following factories: Deering Farm Machine Works; Northwestern Yeast Co., where about 200 Lithuanians are employed; and the Jackson Bridge Works.

    The Lithuanians on the North Side have twelve organizations; seven are Catholic and five are non-Catholic. The Catholic organizations are as follows: St. Michael Archangel parish; St. Michael Archangel Society; one branch of the Lithuanian Roman Catholic Alliance of America; Lithuanian Brothers Society; Grand Duke Gediminas of Lithuania Society; Lithuanian Dramatic Society of St. Cecilia (This Society was formerly known only as the "Lithuanian Dramatic Society;" when the name was lengthened most members resigned and the Society became less active)--the latter society maintains a Lithuanian-American library. The non-Catholic societies are as follows: Lithuanian Tailors 4Mutual-Benefit Club; Chicago Lithuanian Mutual-Benefit Association; two branches of the Lithuanian Alliance of America; one branch of the Lithuanian-American League; and the Singers' Circle.

    Altogether there are five Lithuanian neighborhoods in the city of Chicago, and three in the suburbs. The North Side community has the purest air and the cleanest streets of all the Lithuanian neighborhoods in the city of Chicago. Only the Lithuanian communities in the suburbs of Chicago, such as Roseland and Kensington, have more healthy conditions.

    The first Lithuanian colony in the city of Chicago was formed on the North Side. Some Lithuanians have lived there for about thirty years, or since the Chicago Fire. It ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, II B 1 c 1, II B 2 a, II A 2, II A 1, II D 1, III C
  • Lietuva -- August 27, 1909
    Mikas Petrauskas Opens School of Music

    Mikas Petraukas, the celebrated Lithuanian musical composer who returned to Chicago from France on August 15, will reside at the home of J. Moskus, 3327 S. Lowe Avenue, where he will accept students. He will teach singing and other branches of music.

    Composer Petrauskas is collecting Lithuanian national melodies. Lithuanians who have not yet forgotten the Lithuanian folk-songs, which elderly Lithuanians used to sing to them, are asked not to allow these songs to perish, but to come and sing them to Mr. Petrauskas, who will make permment records of them. In this manner Lithuanians can perform a great service for the benefit of our national music. When Mr. Petrauskas was in Brooklyn, N. Y., he collected about sixty of these melodies.

    Mr. Petrauskas is now organizing a Lithuanian orchestra in Chicago. In the 2 beginning it is planned to play only easy Lithuanian melodies by quartets, sextets, and later by larger orchestral groups.

    Composer Petrauskas has already started to give singing instructions to the Biruta chorus. The chorus has been greatly enlarged. However, it is desired to increase the numerical strength of the chorus to two hundred members; there is still room for a few more new applicants. All musically inclined young Lithuanians are urged to join the chorus at once. Every member of the chorus will have an excellent opportunity to train his or her voice, and learn the entire theory of music, which will be taught by Mr. Petrauskas.

    Regular rehearsals of the Biruta chorus are now being held twice each week, on Monday and Wednesday evenings, at the our Lady of Vilna parish hall, 23rd Place and Oakley Avenue, and twice weekly, on Tuesday and Friday evenings, at the Mark White Square hall, 29th and Halsted Streets.

    The Mikas Petrauskas and Biruta chorus concert will take place on Sunday evening,

    Mikas Petraukas, the celebrated Lithuanian musical composer who returned to Chicago from France on August 15, will reside at the home of J. Moskus, 3327 S. Lowe Avenue, where he ...

    Lithuanian
    IV, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, II A 1