The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Lietuva -- December 31, 1892
    A Few Words to Lithuanian Brothers

    Today, the Lithuanians of Chicago are awakening from slumber, are looking into the bright future. Brothers, let us go forward in this free land of America.

    A man, through education, by reading good books and newspapers, enlightens himself, acknowledges the real God, upholds the orders of church and the duties of his class. A man who does not read good books and newspapers is like a black night without light. A man without any enlightenment is dangerous to himself and to others. What does such a man do when he does not read books nor papers, when he comes home from work? He goes to a saloon! Then, when you ask him to buy a book or subscribe to a paper, he says that he has no money. Brother Lithuanians, let us consider how much money we are spending on Saturday night in saloons! If we ant to show to others that we are people of one nation, we must show to other nations that we are an enlightened people, and not half wild. We can obtain education by reading good books and papers.

    2

    Therefore, brothers, I appeal to you once more, let us awaken from darkness, we must love education and co-operate among ourselves. Let us begin this coming New Year with new hope; let us drop the old costumes of drinking and card playing; let us begin the New Year by reading good books; let us begin a new life after New Year. A lover of the mother country makes this appeal.

    Dychawicze.

    Today, the Lithuanians of Chicago are awakening from slumber, are looking into the bright future. Brothers, let us go forward in this free land of America. A man, through education, ...

    Lithuanian
    I B 1
  • Lietuva -- January 07, 1893
    What Detrikent the Cards Bring

    Dear readers, by seeing what spiritual and material detriment the cards bring to our brothers, I decided to write a few words that you may understand about the hellish effect the cards have.

    You will find many homes where they are playing cards, you will find many Lithuanians who lose money by playing cards.

    Let us look into the life of a card-player. We will see what bad effect the cards bring to them.

    They do not sleep in all night, very often they must drink whiskey by force. Lack of sleep endangers man's health, makes him lazy not only in his work but in serving God also.

    Let us look at the gamblers: all of them with their open mouths are waiting to gulp those few cents that are on the table. You can see the grudge-like stamp on their long faces, the greed to get somebody's money. In their greediness for strange money, they forget the nine and also the seven sins.

    When he wins money he is as proud as though he had saved his soul. Then such a gambler with that money is ready to commit any sin.

    This is not all, when the gambler loses his money, then the trouble starts. Very often they fight, suffer severe injuries, then lose their health, in

    Dear readers, by seeing what spiritual and material detriment the cards bring to our brothers, I decided to write a few words that you may understand about the hellish effect ...

    Lithuanian
    I B 1
  • Lietuva -- January 14, 1893
    The Traveller

    Many were talking and writing about the progress of Lithuanians in Chicago. I did not believe what was said, I decided to investigate for myself. So the last few evenings I visited a few rooming houses.

    If I would tell all that I saw and heard, many of them would get mad at me.

    In one rooming house there were twelve men. All of them were playing cards, the tables were cracking, money spread all over the table, the house was full of smoke, the beds were wet from beer, all were drunk. This was Sunday. They had not been in church at high mass, because they had been playing cards all night. The cards are all damp and dirty, the players eyes and noses were red.

    Some of the drunkards were lying in the corners and sleeping, others were walking and stumbling in the house, swearing and denouncing everybody. I visited many such houses, and found the same thing. Then I began to think what progress they had made. They made no progress, but they went down into the depths of darkness.

    Many were talking and writing about the progress of Lithuanians in Chicago. I did not believe what was said, I decided to investigate for myself. So the last few evenings ...

    Lithuanian
    I B 1, II B 2 d 1
  • Lietuva -- June 24, 1893
    Lithuanians Quit Fighting - it Is Not Nice

    We were told that last Sunday two young Lithuanians had a fight. Both of them were drunk. The dispute was, which of them can speak better English. After a few minutes of hot words they found out neither knew the English language and that both of them were wrong. Then they began to fight.

    This is a disgrace to Chicago Lithuanians. Up to this time Chicago Lithuanians did not fight among themselves. Don't spend your money on drinks. Read newspapers and books, show other nations that we Lithuanians are cultured people.

    We were told that last Sunday two young Lithuanians had a fight. Both of them were drunk. The dispute was, which of them can speak better English. After a few ...

    Lithuanian
    II E 3, I B 1
  • Lietuva -- November 25, 1893
    A Few Words to the Chicago Lithuanians (Editorial)

    There are over six thousand Lithuanians in Chicago, but no people of other nationalities are so poor and so ignorant as the Lithuanians are.

    Everybody laughs at the Poles and the Jews. But look at the Poles, they have many judges; many Poles have city and county jobs; many Poles have big business concerns. Take the Jews, they have banks and all kinds of business establishments. Those people are strong in politics because they have their political clubs and they are citizens of this country. They are strong in politics, have big businesses because they are educated and they read books and newspapers.

    We Lithuanians have nothing. Hundreds of Lithuanians can get no jobs during the present industrial crisis just because they are not citizens. We have no political clubs worth mentioning, no political organizations.

    2

    Lithuanians' do not read papers or books. They spend their money and time in saloons.

    If we Lithuanians would educate ourselves, we would have our judges and other officials in city and county offices.

    We Lithuanians do not take into consideration what opportunities we have in this free country of America. Read good books and newspapers, educate yourselves, join political parties, then will Americans take us for a cultured people, but not as the lowest creatures of society.

    Every Lithuanian should become a citizen because when you are a citizen you will get a job even in the present industrial crisis. You will not starve as so many Lithuanians are starving now.

    There are over six thousand Lithuanians in Chicago, but no people of other nationalities are so poor and so ignorant as the Lithuanians are. Everybody laughs at the Poles and ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, I D 2 c, I B 1, I F 4, I A 3, III A
  • Lietuva -- July 06, 1895
    To the Lithuanian Societies in Chicago

    For the last three years we printed free all the announcements and advertisements of all the Lithuanian societies. I offered for one dollar a year subscription of Lietuva to society members. Some societies voted that its members ought to subscribe to Lietuva but would not enforce it.

    We cannot work for nothing for the Lithuanian societies in Chicago. From now on we will charge five cents per line for every society's advertisement. We tried to help the Lithuanian societies, but we get no benefit from them except denunciations. It will be best to pay us for every advertisement.

    We tried to encourage the activities of the Lithuanian societies to enlighten its members, but the society members did not realize what good work the newspaper was doing for them; instead of paying one dollar yearly subscription of Lietuva they said that it was too much - better to spend the dollar in a saloon.

    Editor.

    For the last three years we printed free all the announcements and advertisements of all the Lithuanian societies. I offered for one dollar a year subscription of Lietuva to society ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 1, III B 2, I B 1
  • Lietuva -- February 01, 1896
    How They Are Uplifting the Nation

    When I came from Lithuania to Chicago I saw an entirely different motto of uplifting the nation.

    As one walks on the street, one sees many patriotic signs on windows and doors. Such signs are very pleasing to the eye, but they are very discouraging to the pocket. Those pleasing to the eye and patriotic signs are on saloons, where our Lithuanians drink and fight under the name of patriotism.

    We cannot uplift patriotism by drinking and fighting. It is a time to quit drinking, we must engage in cultural activity in order to uplift our patriotism.

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    for drunkenness!

    Oh, brothers! When will you enlighten yourselves and understand the horrible things you are doing. Why don't you show to your neighbors that you are civilized and cultured people, instead of drunken brawlers and fighters?

    An Inhabitant of Fisk Street.

    When I came from Lithuania to Chicago I saw an entirely different motto of uplifting the nation. As one walks on the street, one sees many patriotic signs on windows ...

    Lithuanian
    I B 1, I C
  • Lietuva -- March 14, 1896
    The Chicago Lithuanians Uplifted Their Names (Synopsis)

    As it was stated in the last issue of Lietuva many Lithuanians lost their money in the so-called bank of the Hungarian-Jew Koperl. Then one of the Chicago English newspapers referring to the Lithuanians who lost their money in the said bank,printed a slanderous article about Lithuanians.

    On February 22 a meeting was called and a committee elected to protest against the slander on Lithuanians. The newspaper (The Evening Journal) refused to print our protest, and the next day printed a more slanderous article about Lithuanians.

    For this reason we decided to call a mass meeting to make a protest and form a resolution against that newspaper. The mass meeting was called on March 8 at St. George's church hall. Over two thousand Lithuanians were present.

    There were reporters of all English newspapers in Chicago, even the reporter of the Evening Journal, which printed the slanderous article against Lithuanians. There were also reporters from German, Polish and Swedish newspapers.

    2

    Such prominent speakers were on this mass meeting: Theodore Brentano, a judge of the Superior Court and Eugene Seeger, city statistician.

    Mr. E. Seeger said that no one can tell me better about Lithuanians than myself. The newspaper that blackened your name knows nothing about Lithuanians. You have a great language, its history goes back to the ancient Sanscrit; you have a great history; you were oppressed by the Russian Czar; you love freedom, and America gives you that freedom. Why did that newspaper slander you? Because you are a working people. Do not be ashamed that you are workers; this country is being built by the working people, and you came to help build this great country of America. You people, as children of Abraham Lincoln, do not be ashamed to call yourselves workers.

    Pay no attention to the slanderous newspaper .... a real American would not slander you people. You came to this country because your seeking freedom, and you are making progress in spite of slanderous libel of certain newspapers.

    Judge Brentano said: "I don't think that the newspaper which printed that slanderous article about you Lithuanians, have done it with bad intention. They have done it because they didn't know any better. If the newspaper people were 3here on this mass meeting they would be ashamed of themselves if they could see your intelligent faces.

    "At present there are in Chicago over ten thousand Lithuanians. I am a judge for the last six years, and during these years I never had a Lithuanian in may court on any offense. This proves to you that the Lithuanian are law-abiding citizens. Therefore, no prudent American would slander such people.

    "In your old country the Russian government held you under the oppression; you had no freedom there to work out your own destiny. In this country you have freedom, hold meetings, protest against the injustices done to you, print books and newspapers in your own language, and go forward with civilization in this land of the free.

    "By holding this mass meeting today against the slanderous newspaper, you are doing the same as any prudent and respectable people would have done against such injustice."

    The Lithuanian speakers were Mr. Szernas (his real name is Adomaitis), editor of Lietuva; Mr. P. Donaitis, president of the Lithuanian Political Alliance; A. 4Olszewskis, publisher of Lietuva, and Mr. A. Bijanskis.

    The Lithuanian speakers said the newspaper stated in its slanderous article against Lithuanians that only one Lithuanian in two hundred can read; that the Lithuanians in Chicago are working for only fifty or seventy cents a day, because they are still living like slaves in Europe,where they are working for food only. That there are about 15,000 Lithuanians in the world; that the Lithuanians are semi-civilized, etc.

    Against such a slander we are protesting in this meeting. That there are not 15,000 Lithuanians, but over 4,000,000 Lithuanians who are speaking the Lithuanian language.

    We are asking the slanderous newspaper to take into consideration the following facts: - In Chicago there are over 10,000 Lithuanians; 2,000 of them are tailors by trade and their wages run from $1.50 to $4.00 a day; there are 500 moulders; 400 barbers. The Chicago Lithuanians have twelve mutual benefit societies; eight political clubs, and one strong organization - the Illinois Lithuanian Republican Club. Is it possible for a semi-civilized people to have such a tradesmen and such organizations? And yet that newspaper states that we 5are a barbarous people and know nothing of how to take advantage of this free country of America.

    Therefore we are making this protest against the newspaper - the Evening Journal - for the slanderous article against us.

    On the next day all the Chicago newspapers wrote about this mass meeting. English, German, Polish, Swedish - newspapers of every language - wrote about this protest meeting. Especially the Inter-Ocean newspaper printed word by word the speech of Judge Brentano.

    Now everybody knows that the Lithuanians are not such ignorant people as the said paper described. Even the Evening Journal which printed the slanderous article against us, now after this mass meeting, wrote that the Lithuanians who were present at this protest meeting were clean, well dressed and intelligent people.

    Some of the newspapers even mentioned the past historical events in the history of Lithuania, and about the Lithuanians in America.

    6

    Now, Lithuanians, do not be ashamed to call yourselves Lithuanians. Beware of drinking, gambling and laziness, as some of us are. Read newspapers and books, educate yourselves, show that you are enlightened, but not such ignoramuses, as the paper stated that only one Lithuanian in two hundred can read.

    As it was stated in the last issue of Lietuva many Lithuanians lost their money in the so-called bank of the Hungarian-Jew Koperl. Then one of the Chicago English newspapers ...

    Lithuanian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, III A, I B 1
  • Lietuva -- March 13, 1897
    A Protest of the Chicago Lithuanians

    Last Sunday, twenty-five hundred Chicago Lithuanians held a mass meeting in the St. George's church hall in Bridgeport, where they adopted the following resolution:

    That the Lithuanians from the ancient times were and at present are the confessors and sons of our mother, the holy Roman-Catholic Church, always acknowledging with obedience as the head of our church His Holiness the Pope and the bishops.

    That in these days, among the Lithuanians, Satan with the help of the Russian hirelings, brought forth the seed of heresy and error by establishing the heretical church, otherwise called the Independent Church, whose leaders are the excommunicated Catholic priests, or such persons who never had been Catholic priests.

    2

    That the servants of Satan, the Poles, under the cover of some kind of of Independent Church, began to mislead our Lithuanians, by taking away the faith of our ancestors, that is, from the teaching of Jesus Christ.

    We know that Lithuanians have suffered a martyrdom, they have shed their blood for the cause of faith, and they are still shedding their blood, as they did at Kraziai.

    Therefore, we, the twenty-five hundred Lithuanians in this meeting, are openly condemning the church of those heretics as the product of the Satanic and the Russian Hell, and those Lithuanians who belong to that church, or take a friendly attitude toward it, we are holding them up as the Russian spies and as the sellers of God and the Fatherland.

    We are deciding that every Lithuanian who belongs or helps such a church. can not be accepted by any church society, or if he belongs, he ought 3 to be expelled from such society at once; and that every good Lithuanian must have nothing to do with them, and protect himself as from a poisonous plague or a mad malady.

    By such an attitude you will show the immorality of that damnable church.

    We are appealing to every faithful Lithuanian, we are begging of him to pray to the Lord, that he will convert them back to the right road, that He will return them back to the old Roman-Catholic church.

    Joseph Garinskas, President

    Julius Astrauskas, Secretary of the Parish Meeting. 5 Vincent Berzinski's church of St. Stanislaus, at Noble and Division St.

    When some members of the church got sick, they called for a priest instead of a doctor. Most of the parishioners got sick at night from over eating and drunkenness. So the sick people called the priest to their houses for confession. As Anthony Kozlowski was a vicar, so his rector, Vincent Barzinski, sends the Vicar Kozlowski to the sick people to confess them.

    Every time Vicar Kozlowski went to confess the sick women, he used to take to them a bottle of wine belonging to his rector, Barzinski. When later Barzinski found out that his wine was almost gone, he asked Vicar Kozlowski what had become of that wine. Vicar Kozlowski admitted that he took the wine to the sick women. So Rector Barzinski expelled his vicar, Kozlowski, from his church. Then the priest, Kozlowski, went to a priest, Joseph Barzinski, a brother of the priest Vincent Barzinski. who had St. Jadwiga's church at Noble and Lubaok Avenue. Later

    6

    on Kozlowski was expelled by Rector Joseph Barzinski for the same reason, taking his wine to the sick women.

    Now Vicar Kozlowski had no place and no priest wanted to accept him because Vicar Kozlowski stole wine from his superiors and gave it to the women.

    A. L. Graiciunas, Alex Szidlauskas, and Anthony Steponavice, spoke Polish language fluently, saw their chance to organize an Independent Catholic Church. They explained to the priest, Lozlowski, their plan and the priest accepted.

    A saloon keeper, Mr. Dzilwer, at Hoyne and Luback Avenue, had a hall above his saloon. The saloon keeper permitted them, of course, for business reasons, to make a temporary church in his hall. The altar, etc. was installed. With leaflets this new church was advertised far and wide. 7 On the first Sunday the large hall was crowded with the people, mostly women, to whom the priest Kozlowski previously used to deliver the wine. The collection was large, over $500

    The Polish Roman-Catholic priests were greatly alarmed because this new priest Kozlowski had no fixed price for confession, mass, etc. The people could pay as much as they wanted. If they had no money, the priest confessed them, gave absolution, held mass free of charge to the poor people, because this Independent Church was not for exploitation, but for service to the people.

    This new Independent Catholic church was such a great success that the parish built a large hospital at Hoyne and Luback Avenue.

    Then the Roman-Catholic priests started to blackmail the Independent Church. They succeeded in making disturbances and fights in the Independent Catholic church. Many times the Roman-Catholic Poles, with the help of police who were also Roman-Catholics, attacked the parishioners 8 of the Independent Catholic church in their church, during the mass.

    The women used to beat off with red peppers the attack of police and others.

    About those great fights in 1897 between the Polish Roman-Catholics and the Independent Catholics, you can find information in the Chicago Daily Tribune and the Dziennik Chicagoski, a Polish newspaper.

    Also an Independent Catholic church was organized at 18th and Ashland Avenue, and the other at 32d and Auburn (Lituanica) Avenue.

    For this reason the Lithuanian Roman-Catholics held that mass meeting as a protest and denunciation of the Independent Catholic church movement. The protest mass meeting was held, not at the instance of the Lithuanian people, but under the leadership of the Priest Krawczunas.

    Last Sunday, twenty-five hundred Chicago Lithuanians held a mass meeting in the St. George's church hall in Bridgeport, where they adopted the following resolution: That the Lithuanians from the ancient ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, I C, I B 4, I B 1, IV
  • Lietuva -- January 21, 1898
    Our National Clubs

    We are often reading in the newspapers that there was organized a new Lithuanian club. But unfortunately we cannot separate the good from the evil, very often the bad we are calling good, and to the good Lithuanian clubs we are refusing to join.

    The majority of our clubs are demoralizing our unenlightened brothers by spreading drunkenness; such clubs are weapons for the leaders of them. The clubs of other nationalities have as their duty the enlightenment of their members about the political laws, while our clubs are the political beggars, because they are not organized for the good of nationalism; such clubs are bringing profit to their leaders.

    Did our political clubs uplift our Lithuanian name, did they try by any effort to improve the living conditions of the poor? Not by any means.

    2

    The politicians hate us, we become the drudges and are forced to follow them blindly, accept their schemes, and for obeying them they buy a keg of beer for us before election day. Therefore, from such club we are getting no benefit. We must reorganize our clubs on a better basis, on a moral foundation. Such clubs ought to have as their duty to enlighten and educate their members, but not to demoralize them.

    The Worker.

    We are often reading in the newspapers that there was organized a new Lithuanian club. But unfortunately we cannot separate the good from the evil, very often the bad we ...

    Lithuanian
    III B 2, I C, I B 1, I F 2