The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Lietuva -- September 02, 1898
    The Chicago Parish School Affairs (Summary)

    When Lietuva brought up the question of the Chicago parish school, I believed that the matter soon would be closed. But as the struggle is going on, it might be permissible for me to stick in my own dvileki (a coin with the value of 11/2 kopecks).

    Some of our people may not like what I will say, but I love the truth and will say what I believe.

    I like to offend neither the committee nor others. A man, consisting of soul and body, requires double propagation for his soul and body. The people of Chicago understand that nobody will take such good care of their children, soul and body, as the sisters or the nuns.

    When Lietuva mentioned the improper conduct in the school, all started to cry that there were no truth in it, and they say that the nuns are teaching 2our children very well; they teach to say their prayers, good conduct in the church, to worship the Lord God, in other words, they rear the children for the good of their souls. For this I am honoring the committee of the Chicago school. When we sow into their young hearts the good seed, we will reap a good crop. But ... unfortunately, the Chicago school committee was mindful only of the souls, and forgot to rear the bodies and the minds of our children. Therefore, Lietuva had the right to talk about such a teaching. In the Lithuanian school, supported with Lithuanian money, the Lithuanian children are instructed by teachers who do not know Lithuanian! This is a real scandal. I would try to justify the committee on this point; I will say that when a chicken is looking for a night's sleep and flies up to the top of a tree, then the chicken believes that it sits so high that even the eagle would not be able of fly up that high. It is the same way with the Chicago school committee, it believes that when the children can read and write, then they can climb up to the top of the cherry tree. Now then, when the chickens are looking for the highest tree, and when we have seen the protest against the Chicago school committee, and proving the benefit of knowing the Lithuanian language, we must 3say, "Dear members of the committee, you like to sit on the top of the tree, but you do not wish to see your children lift themselves higher."

    The Chicago school committee itself does not know much about the Lithuanian language. The Lithuanian school is supported with Lithuanian money. I wish that in the Lithuanian school Lithuanian would be taught besides English. But the teachers - nuns - do not know Lithuanian.

    For such conduct of the committee I blame Rev. Krawczunas. The priest as a spiritual leader paid no attention to teaching our children the Lithuanian language.

    I am acquainted with schools in several countries where the nuns are teaching as in Italy, Austria and France. The nuns there not only are teaching in elementary schools, but in high schools, too. The nun-teachers there are qualified by the government, educated in higher schools. In England and Scotland the nuns have no high education, so they are not allowed to teach civil education.

    4

    Of the nuns in the Chicago Lithuanian school who have diplomas or not I do not ask. Even if they are highly educated, if they do not know the Lithuanian language, they cannot teach in a Lithuanian school.

    Therefore, the Chicago school committee should see that your children would get not only spiritual education, but civil education as well.

    (The school committee can do nothing in the school affairs, because the priest controls the school. Editor.)

    A Priest from Europe.

    When Lietuva brought up the question of the Chicago parish school, I believed that the matter soon would be closed. But as the struggle is going on, it might be ...

    Lithuanian
    I A 2 a, I C, III C, I A 2 b, III A
  • Lietuva -- September 16, 1898
    How To Improve the Situation of Our Parish

    In the past few numbers of Lietuva you have seen the situation of the Chicago Lithuanian parish. You have seen the Rev. Krawczunas' public statement of income since the inception of the parish from 1892 to 1896 inclusive, as follows:

    In the statement of 1895 $28,787.78
    In the statement of 1896 34,952.00
    Loan from the bank 15,000.00

    From the time of establishment of this parish up to 1896, income the parish treasury was $78,739.78. Rev. Krawzounas says nothing about how much money he collected from the people in 1897 and 1898. He gave 2 no account of it to his parishioners. The priest's statement of 1896 shows that during one and one half years he collected over $34,000 from his parishioners, which means more than $20,000 per year. Now, if during the slack years he has collected over $20,000 per year, then during the better times in these last two years, if he were unable to collect $20,000, at least he was able to collect $15,000 a year, then, for the last two years it would be as follows:

    Since the establishment of the parish up to 1896 as Rev. Krawczunas stated in his own statement, the income into the parish treasure was $78,739.78. For the last two years, let us say just $30,000.00. From the inception of the parish up to the present time the income to the parish treasury was $108,739.78.

    3

    Here we use the income. The priest is the treasurer of the parish. Now let us glimpse at the spending: could the priest have spent all of that hundred and eight thousand dollars?

    The priest even made a mortgage on the church; then how much money was left to the priest?

    The priest appointed his own committee in order to show the expenses of the parish. but the committee showed only $41,758 expenses. This is too low. The priest had more expenses than the committee stated. We will not go according to the committee's statement, but on the priest's own statement or 1895 and 1896. We will take a very honest account of the expenses:

    4 5
    Fire Insurance $455.00
    Paid off deposits 8,265.00
    Rents before the rectory was built 104.40
    The three year salaries as the priest himself stated 4,824.64
    And for the last two years let us make the same amount of salaries 3,217.00
    Rev. Kolesinski's salary for 22 months at $70 per month 1,540.00
    14 lots (for the church) 11,200.00
    Rectory 9,700.00
    Church 18,169.73
    The church furniture 4,701.04
    The bells 729.94
    The bell tower and steeple 1,275.00
    The street pavements $736.10
    The school house - we can say at 2,000.00
    Fence, improvement of the churchyard 1,000.00
    To Rev. Kolosinski's organist at $30 per month 660.00
    All the expenses were $68,577.91

    New let us compare income and expenses:

    Income $108.739.78
    Expenses $68,577.91
    Then, what has the treasurer (priest) done with the balance of $40,161.87?

    Let the priest explain to us in one way or the other; from the pulpit, 6 at the meeting, or in writing, whichever he thinks is better for him, what became of the balance of $40,151.87.

    We estimated all the expenses that the priest had in the parish affairs. We estimated the land, the buildings, the fence, everything that was bought for the church, and the wages to the servants since the establishment of the church up to the present time. We estimated not of our own knowledge, but according to the priest's public statements of 1895 and 1896. Even though the expenses were very high, still $40,000 was left of parishioners' money.

    If we had taken honest account of that money, and if we ourselves had hired the contractor to build the church, what a church we could have 7 built for $12,000, and not for $18,169.75, as our priest contracted!

    The owner offered those two lots at Auburn Avenue to the parish for $2,500.00, but our priest, for the good of his parishioners, paid $3,600 for them. Maybe all the other expenses were estimated by the priest with the same honesty.

    Now, where is the truth?

    The treasurer (Rev. Krawczunas), by the way, calls himself honest, but when we look into his treasury we find no justice, because the treasurer refuses to show the parish budget books. He hides the books. No one is required to hide the truth. only the wrongdoer is the one who hides the truth.

    8

    $40,000 of the parishioners’ money was lost by the treasurer, and on top of it, there was a $20,000 debt made on the church. Where is Justice? Where is the morality of such a treasurer as our Rev. Krawczunas? Let even one moral parishioner ask himself, is our priest doing right by such a conduct of his parishioners' budget? Shall we leave our priest as treasurer in the future to collect money from the people and to increase the debt on the church?

    As long as we keep the priest as parish treasurer, the debt on the church will not decrease. but will grow up, as the Polish church debt grew from $10,000 up to $100,000. No matter how many thousands of dollars we deposit, the priest's pockets are very deep, they can contain millions of dollars, and yet, the debts on the church will grow.

    9

    If we want to improve the standing of our parish. if we want to pay off the church debt, and to have our church free of debts, we should not deposit our money in the priest's pocket but deposit it in the bank. In the bank our money will be safe, and any time the parish needs the money it can take it. But when the money is deposited in the priest's pocket, from there you cannot take it. Once the priest puts the money in his own pocket, than the parish will not get it. no matter for what purpose the parish needs money. If the money is needed for some improvement of the parish, the priest will never use the parish money; he will borrow the money as he has done in the past. The Polish priest has been doing the same.

    From this day we ought to elect the parish administration; the president, vice-president. secretary, treasurer and collectors.

    10

    We must have the parish ledger. The collectors must deliver the money to the cashier, and the cashier must deposit the money in the bank, and then the bank book must be given to the president. All the administration must be under bond for responsibility for the parish money. The parish officers elected once a year must examine the ledger and the budget. Pay salary to the priest, and leave him the profits of baptism, masses, nuptial services and the funerals, as to the other affairs, the priest should have no rights. The price of baptisms, nuptial services and funerals must be set, and the priest should pay taxes for it. Then we will have order in our parish, the priest will be good to us, and we good to the priest. All the misunderstandings among us will disappear, because there will be nothing to fight for.

    11

    From the last statement of the priest, we see that there are 3,000 parishioners. By paying to the parish treasury $5 by each person each year, in one year $15,000 would be in the bank; in two years would be $30,000, in three years, $45,000, and in ten years we would have $150,000. For $30,000 we would finish our unfinished church; for $50,000 we would establish a hospital; another $50,000 would build an asylum for our old people, orphans and invalids, and the balance of $20,000, we would have in the bank for reserve. We could have a good school, so that some of our Lithuanians could be able to obtain higher education.

    We would have all that, if our money would not go to the priest's pockets. In that manner we could show ourselves that we are good Catholics, love God and our fellow man.

    Today we are depositing everything in the priest’s 12 pocket. Although in our prayers we say: "I love God with all my might and my fellow man as myself," by saying that we are deceiving God Himself. Let us prove where our love of God and our fellow man is. Instead of loving God, we are only loving the priest, we are sticking everything into his pocket, and we pay no attention to the fact that our priest pawned the house of God to the bank.

    Then where is our love for our fellow man? Today, if our fellow Lithuanian is injured on the railroad, or in the factory, loses his legs or arms, where do we put him? We are taking him to the Presbyterian or Protestant hospital. Our old people, who have lost their health, cannot support themselves any more, they find shelter with Protestants, with non-Catholics while we are Catholics. We show our Catholicism only with lips and tongues, but our manners and actions are worse than those of 13 wild people. We are feeding one priest like a fatling, but the invalids, the orphans and the old people, we do not see. If those not Catholic would give no shelter to our poor Lithuanian Catholics, they would starve to death!

    We and our children are sinking into the abyss. We have no place to get enlightenment and education because all of our donations are going into the priest's pocket. Such is our love for our fellow man. Are we not defrauding God by lying in our prayers that "We love our fellow man like ourselves?" For the amount of money that we are wasting on the priest, we could help hundreds of our unfortunate brothers. Then we could show that we love our fellow man, and for that we could obtain God's blessing. Instead of helping our brothers, we are increasing the capital in the bank for the priest. Are we helping Catholicism? No!

    14

    We are increasing the enemies of the priest, and we are humiliating the priest himself. It is time for us, brothers, to wake up; we must not provoke the animosity of our God anymore.

    We should not make the world laugh at us for our improper conduct. It is time to know that God is our God, but not the priest; and to do what God told us, but not what the priest says. As long as we will not make God understand that we are people and behave like people, until then we will not be able to raise ourselves from our unsuitable living condition. So long as we will have in our mind only the priest and the saloon, the people will take us for savages as they are holding us today.

    Brothers, it is time to wake up.

    In the past few numbers of Lietuva you have seen the situation of the Chicago Lithuanian parish. You have seen the Rev. Krawczunas' public statement of income since the inception ...

    Lithuanian
    III C, I A 2 a, I A 2 b, II D 3, II D 4, II D 5, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- December 16, 1898
    Intrigues in the Simonas Daukantas Society

    The Rev. M. Krawczunas having personal animosity against the publisher of Lietuva, Mr. A. Olszewski, because he blames the former for keeping up the Polish school in the Lithuanian parish and for the deficit in the parish budget, is trying to expel Mr. Olszewski from the society.

    The readers have read in the last issue of Lietuva the complaint against Olszewski, written by Rev. Krawczunas to the Simonas Daukantas and St. Casimir societies. The complaint of Rev. Krawczunas was rejected by both societies. Now the priest is trying another intrigue to expel Olszewski from those societies. The priest hired three of his ignorant followers, who are members of Simonas Daukantas Society, and sent them to get the signatures of members to call an extra meeting, These three members obtained six signatures, and the other six names the priest signed himself. Now then, according to the by-laws of the society, ten members can call the extra meeting, so the meeting was called on Sunday, Dec. 11 to expel Olszewski from the society.

    2

    The administration of the society foresaw the intrigue of the priest, who provoked a disturbance and a fight at a national celebration in the past, so they thought the priest and his thugs might start a fight at this meeting too, so the administration brought police to the meeting. When the president called the meeting to order, the priest asked what the meeting was called for. Some of those present said that they knew nothing, while others said that they never signed their names, that their signatures were forged. When Rev. Krawczunas saw that the meeting would be dissolved as illegal, he pulled from his pocket the charter and shouted: "I am the master here." At once the priest jumped behind the table, and tried to expel the administration. The priest's followers at once joined the commotion, started to swear and shout, so that it was impossible to understand what was said. The police were watching that there should be no fight. So the meeting was closed.

    All left the hall, except the priest, who with few of his followers remained in the hall. Behind closed doors, the priest held his own meeting, elected a new administration, and told his ignorant followers 3that he would take away from the society the books, budget, and the charter, and those who are against him would be kicked out of the society.

    Therefore, we, the administration of the Simonas Daukantas Society, are standing for justice and for the good of our society, which as a national and scientific name, are protesting against such shameless conduct of the Rev. Krawczunas. We are asking the priest to stop intriguing in the societies, and spreading hatred among Lithuanians. Instead of inducing hate among the Lithuanians, the priest would act more prudently if he expelled the Polish nuns from the Lithuanian school, quit feeding them with Lithuanian money and watch the altar, from which you have exhorted us since you came from Russia.

    The Administration of Simonas Daukantas Society.

    The Rev. M. Krawczunas having personal animosity against the publisher of Lietuva, Mr. A. Olszewski, because he blames the former for keeping up the Polish school in the Lithuanian parish ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 d 1, II B 1 a, I A 2 b, III C, I C, IV
  • Lietuva -- November 03, 1899
    To the Chicago Lithuanians

    In number 43 of the Katalikas, the Chicago branch of the Lithuanian Alliance of America complains that not everything that was written about the Chicago Lithuanians was true.

    It might be so, but, dear patriots, is this the time to make complaints about what was written about the Chicago Lithuanians a year ago? Can I write anything better in my book (the History of the American Lithuanians) when I was unable to get information from the Rev. Krawczunas about the Chicago Lithuanians?

    I wrote to Lietuva for material about the Chicago Lithuanians. The obtained facts, I thought, might be partial. So I wrote to the Rev. Krawczunas for more information about the St. George's Church; how much it cost to build, how many parishioners belong to that parish, how many societies are there, but the Rev. Krawczunas gave no answer.

    You say in Katalikas that there was no misunderstanding between the Chicago 2Lithuanians and their priest. But I know, and all the Lithuanians in America know, that there was trouble at the St. George's Church in Chicago.

    You say that the nuns who are teaching the Lithuanian children know the Lithuanian language, but I know and all the Lithuanians know that the nuns do not know Lithuanian.

    You say that in Chicago there are more than 5,800 Lithuanians. I will say that there are no more until you prove it to me.

    The most important about the nuns and the Lithuanian parish school is this: What languages the nuns are teaching; in what language do the nuns speak to their pupils; in what language the pupils are speaking among themselves; how many children are attending the church school?

    Rev. John Zilinskas.

    In number 43 of the Katalikas, the Chicago branch of the Lithuanian Alliance of America complains that not everything that was written about the Chicago Lithuanians was true. It might ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 d 3, II B 2 d 1, I A 2 a, I A 2 b, III C, III A
  • Lietuva -- September 17, 1909
    To Commemorate 40th Anniversary of Lithuanian Immigration

    The Lithuanian organizations of South Chicago are making plans to commemorate the fortieth anniversary of Lithuanian mass immigration to America on October 24, at Koneczny Hall, 88th Street and Commercial Avenue.

    The profit from this celebration will be used to publish Lithuanian School-books, and to pay for the time of two Lithuanian men for making a complete statistical survey of the South Chicago Lithuanian colony. The two men who will gather the statistics will be selected after the above celebration.

    During the celebration the purpose and value of the statistical study will be explained in detail to the people. Everyone will be asked to co-operate with the enumerators to make the survey as complete and accurate as possible.

    2

    The efforts of the South Chicago Lithuanians to make a statistical survey of their colony is a fine example to other Chicago Lithuanian colonies. It would be a very good thing if all other colonies would follow this example, and in that way assist the Lietuva (Lithuania) to make a complete statistical survey of the Lithuanians of Chicago. Questionnaire blanks may be had at the office of the Lietuva, 3252 S. Halsted Street, Chicago, Ill.

    The Lithuanian organizations of South Chicago are making plans to commemorate the fortieth anniversary of Lithuanian mass immigration to America on October 24, at Koneczny Hall, 88th Street and Commercial ...

    Lithuanian
    III A, I A 2 b, III G
  • Lietuva -- September 08, 1911
    The Aurora School

    September 4 was registration day for the Aurora Evening School. Thirty persons have registered. There is enough room for many more students.

    In the evening school the following subjects will be taught:

    1). English.

    2). Arithmetic.

    3). Lithuanian

    4). Draftsmanship.

    5). Geography and History

    6). How to read and write correctly in Lithuanian.

    The classes will be [conducted] two evenings a week, two hours per evening. For English, arithmetic, geography and history lessons, [the fee] will be 2$7.00 per month, less than six cents an hour. For Lithuanian, the class will be once a week--the fee will be 50 cents a month; for draftsmanship, two evenings a week, $10.50 per month. The class in how to read and write in Lithuanian will be given once a week, one dollar for six months. We are inviting all those who are thinking of joining our school to come without delay. You can register every evening, between 6:30 and 7:30, at the Aurora reading room, 3149 S. Halsted Street. Sundays, from 10 A.M. to 7 P.M.

    September 4 was registration day for the Aurora Evening School. Thirty persons have registered. There is enough room for many more students. In the evening school the following subjects will ...

    Lithuanian
    II B 2 f, I A 2 b, I A 3, III A
  • Lietuva -- December 08, 1911
    The Aurora School Announcement

    At the present time many Lithuanians are unemployed and have plenty of leisure time; also those who are working have free time at present, because this is the four week period of advent and all the theaters, dances and other amusements have been suspended. During this period it is advisable that you [seek to] obtain the knowledge which you are lacking. It can be found in newspapers, books, lectures and schools.

    The Aurora Society, in order to help our Lithuanians to obtain knowledge, has established these institutions: the library at 3149 So. Halsted Street, open every evening from 7 P.M. to 10 P.M., and on Sundays, from 10 A.M. to 7 P.M. In the library there are various Lithuanian newspapers printed in America and Europe--you can read them without charge. We have decided to enlarge our library, we will have newspapers of other languages: two English, 2two Russian, and two Polish.

    Every Sunday we are presenting popular science lectures on various subjects.

    We have an evening school, where we teach English and Lithuanian, arithmetic and a beginner's course. In order to help those who are unemployed, the Aurora Society's Educational Committee has decided that those who have lost their jobs may attend the Aurora School without charge provided they agree to pay when they are employed again.

    At the present time many Lithuanians are unemployed and have plenty of leisure time; also those who are working have free time at present, because this is the four week ...

    Lithuanian
    I A 3, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 a, II B 2 f, II B 2 g, I A 2 b, I D 2 c, III B 2, I B 4