The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- January 11, 1890
    The Hebrew Charity Ball

    The approaching annual Hebrew Charity Ball, January 21, will undoubtedly eclipse all former similar events. Everything connected with this important social event is on a grander and more magnificent scale than ever, and the care and attention bestowed upon the details for the comfort and entertainment of the participants have resulted in a much larger advance sale than ever before.

    Over 1,000 tickets at $10 each have been reported sold and numerous committees have not reported. The entire Auditorium will be utilized for dancing and supper will be served by the Auditorium Hotel Company in the gentlemen's parlors, cafe, main corridors, and bar of the hotel proper. The Chicago Orchestra of fifty pieces will provide the dance music and the Second Regiment Band of thirty pieces will provide the promenade music.

    The auction sale of boxes will take place next Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock in the main Auditorium, Mr. Bernard Kahn officiating as auctioneer.

    Arrangements have been perfected with Leroy Payne for sending guests home after the ball, and private carriages will not be permitted in line to return occupants home.

    The approaching annual Hebrew Charity Ball, January 21, will undoubtedly eclipse all former similar events. Everything connected with this important social event is on a grander and more magnificent scale ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, V A 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 19, 1891
    Our Russian Exiles.

    On the West Side, in a district bounded by Sixteenth Street on the south and Polk Street on the North and the Chicago River and Halsted Street on the East and West one can walk the streets for blocks and see none but Semitic features and hear nothing but the Hebrew patois of Russian Poland.

    In this restricted boundary, in narrow streets, unventilated tenements, and rickety cottages there is a population of from 15,000 to 16,000 Russian Jews. The Jews of Russia on their removal to this country follow precisely the habits of their forefathers in Warsaw; the habit of living together in cities and that of trading as in Warsaw; for instance, the proportion of common laborers and menials is very small, hardly eight percent.

    Every Jew in this quarter who can speak a word of English is engaged in business of some sort. The favorite occupation, probably on account of the small capital required, is fruit and vegetable peddling. Here also, is the home of the Jewish street merchant, the rag and junk peddler, and the "glass puddin" man. The big rag warehouses and scrap iron yards are here supplied by the decrepit old rag pickers and the noisy owner of the "old rags and iron" wagon.

    2

    The principal streets in the quarter are lined with stores of every description, all of them kept by Jews and nearly all with a sign in Hebrew hung out that the trade catered to is not to Gentiles. The streets given up to domiciles are very narrow, hardly wider than alleys, and lined on both sides with one story cottages and garbage boxes.

    In tenement houses glimpses are had of whole families in hot crowded rooms at work with sewing machine and needle putting together the "indestructible overall" and in a stifling little closet of a room a cobbler is at work on rough, heavy boots.

    Trades, with which Jews are not usually associated, such as saloonkeeping, shaving, and haircutting and blacksmithing, have their representatives and Hebrew signs. The butcher and his satellite, the man who goes to the abbatoir and slaughters animals and who slits the gullet of the Sabbath chicken or the holiday duck, both have their signs, which to the uninitiated look much like a bar of music without the staff.

    In a narrow street a private school is in full blast. In the front basement 3room of a small cottage forty small boys all with hats on sit crowded into a space 10 x 10 feet in size, presided over by a stout middle aged man with a long curling matted beard, who also retains his hat, a battered, rusty derby of ancient style. All the old or middle aged men in the quarter affect the peculiar headgear, and one would imagine, that they had all been manufactured at one time from the same block and had withstood the same vicissitudes of time and weather.

    The men are all bearded - that is those who are old enough to have beards - and they are all of the type one sees in pictures of Jewish Siberian exiles. The hair is also worn long, with little curls, which hang before the ears. A middle aged or old man without a long black coat is a rarity, and to the passing stranger these men all look very much alike.

    The younger generation of men are more progressive and having been born in this country, are patriotic and want to be known as Americans and not Russians.

    The women know only three stages of life. The young unmarried women are 4often very attractive, with keen dark oriental faces and large, dark eyes. They affect little coquetries of dress and are able assistants in the shops of their fathers and brothers. The married women soon show the effects of care and the troubles of motherhood. The younger ones still show traces of former beauty fast being lost in approaching obesity and attention to their household, maternal and shopping duties. The last stage, that of old age is passed in attendance on the younger children or doing light housework. The old women are usually very fat, with here and there a little, wizened, old great-grandmother who wanders about crooning to a fat baby while mother cooks the dinner.

    The streets literally swarm with children, who play about the gutters and are a dark skinned, tumble haired, noisy lot of youngsters. There are a number of dingy looking doorways, over which a sign proclaims that Russian baths may be taken within. There is also the usual sign in Hebrew. But the Russian bath houses have the appearance of neglect, which the condition of the inhabitants does not belie....

    The commercial life of this district seems to be uncommonly keen. Every one 5is looking for a bargain and every one has something to sell. The home life seems to be full of content and easy going unconcern for what the outside world thinks. During those hot nights the dwellers on Judd, Liberty and other residence streets bring out mattresses and blankets and camp under nature's roof on sidewalk and steps.

    On the West Side, in a district bounded by Sixteenth Street on the south and Polk Street on the North and the Chicago River and Halsted Street on the East ...

    Jewish
    III A, III G, I C, V A 2
  • Reform Advocate -- March 04, 1893
    From Mr. H. Eliassof's Report as Superintendent of the Society in Aid of Russian Refugees

    The Society was organized on August 23rd, 1891, and the work of relieving the refugees commenced the following month. On Jan. 31st, 1893, it completed 17 months of work. During the first 6 months, 391 applications were considered with $5,616 disbursed. In the following 11 months, 671 applications were taken and $25,038 expended, making a grand total of $1,062 applications and $30,654 cash disbursed for 17 months.

    In the beginning of March, 1892, the Society was reorganized and arrangements were then completed to receive, care for, and distribute a greater number of refugees than before. Energetic efforts were made to enable the Society to send away from Chicago to the country towns as many refugees as could be induced to leave the large and crowded city. The work of distribution was done systematically. The refugees were not forced upon the 2communities, but were shipped to places only, where our traveling agent found parties who were willing to accept the new-comers and help them find homes and work. All families or single men, who were sent from Chicago to the country, were assigned with credentials to one man or to a committee, in the respective town, who took charge of them. The 1,062 applications during the 17 months represent a total number of 2,968 persons, the number of families being 603. Among the total number of applications were 387 mechanics, with 75 trades represented, 26 professionals, and 44 farmers.

    915 persons were sent away from Chicago, of which 129 returned. Some of these came back because they preferred not to stay in small towns where they could not live Kosher, according to the dietary laws of the Mosaic Code. The Employment Bureau was in operation from March 23rd to Sept. 17, 1892 and during this time found work for 505 applicants.

    3

    Taking into consideration the large number of people in the care of the Society, very few deaths occurred during these 17 months.

    The results of the work can be considered very satisfactory. From reliable bits of information received by the Society, it may be safely concluded that the majority of those refugees who were sent to the country communities are well taken care of and are in a better position than those who remained in the city. Most of them have found employment and are becoming self sustaining. Some of the married men who had left their families in Russia were able, after working 6 or 8 months, to send enough money to bring their relatives here.

    The Society was organized on August 23rd, 1891, and the work of relieving the refugees commenced the following month. On Jan. 31st, 1893, it completed 17 months of work. During ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, V A 2, II D 1, V A 2
  • American Jewish Year Book -- September 21, 1903
    Edited by Cyrus Adler

    NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. THE JEWISH AGRICULTURISTS' AID SOCIETY OF AMERICA. (pp.116 - 118.)

    The Biennial Meeting of the Jewish Agirculturists' Aid Society of America was held January 6, 1902, at Chicago, Illinois. The object of the society is to make loans to prospective Jewish farmers. Since 1888, when it was organized, the society realized its object without means of its own. The money loaned by the society had been advanced by Jewish citizens of Chicago, who invested and reinvested sums varying from $150 to $1,000, to the proteges of the society. As individuals willing to make such loans cannot always be found readily, it was decided to create a "Loan Fund." With this end in view the society now issues "Certificates of Credit," in denominations of ten dollars and upwards. The certificates are redeemable after ten years from the date of issue, or before, at the option of the society, and bear interest at the rate of three percent per annum, payable January 1. It was also decided that persons who had made loans to Jewish farmers through the society, be permitted to exchange the papers they hold for such loans for the Loan Certificates of the society. Up to July 1, 1902, Loan Certificates to the amount of $8,095 were subscribed for. Membership fees and donations 2are used to carry on the work of the society. As an additional revenue for this purpose it was decided to place "Mite Boxes" in Jewish households; the scheme to be operated through the Sabbath School children and teachers.

    The following data are taken from the reports of the Corresponding Secretary, for 1901, and the first six months of 1902: Since 1888, when the society was organized, the society has settled 105 farmers, of whom 89 are at present still on their farms. The cost of settling a family on a farm varied from $300 to $1,000. In every case, assistance was rendered in the shape of a loan, secured at the rate of four percent. The 89 families work on an aggregate of 10,617 acres of land, situated in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Florida. Thirty-six families have taken homesteads on government lands, 5,760 acres, valued at $28,000. On these homesteads have been built 29 dwellings, 22 barns, 15 granaries, 10 stables, 6 sheds and corn cribs. The buildings represent a value of $14,500. Forty-one families have purchased 3,617 acres for $48,630, valued, in their present improved condition, at $65,000. Twelve farmers work 1,230 acres of 3rented land, paying annually $1,460 in rent. The 89 families own 257 horses, 277 cows, and 195 calves. The aggregate amount loaned to the society is $35,525, of which sum $22,495 have been repaid; 38 persons still owing $14,030. The total encumbrance on the farms, including liens held by others as well as by the society, is $26,200. The cost of carrying on the work of the society since 1888, setting aside the loans made to farmers, has been less than $3,000, or an average of about $230 a year, for printing, postage, legal fees, records, etc.

    During 1901, the society assisted 28 parties - 20 heads of families, and 8 single men, or 57 adults over sixteen years, and [gap]0 children under that age - all more or less depending upon the Jewish Charities of Chicago, to take up farming as an occupation. Five have rented 330 acres, 11 have purchased 640 acres, and 12 have filed homestead claims upon 1,920 acres of government lands. The farms are located in Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Florida, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Oklahoma. Of these assisted farmers, 17 had about $6,500 of their own. During the year, 23 loans were granted by the society, aggregating $9,800. Twelve of these loans were made to farmers who took up the work during the year, 11 to farmers of longer standing.

    4

    Three of these loans were advanced by the Jewish Agricultural and Industrial Aid Society of New York, the rest of the money was advanced by Jewish citizens of Chicago. The repaying of loans proceeded promptly during the year.

    The report of the first six months of 1902, is as follows: Loans made by the society on its own account, $7,983.14; expenditures $496.95; balance $153.19. Total balance in treasury, $569.21. Thirty-six parties have been assisted to take up farming in Colorado, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and Dakota. The society has taken stock in the "Wilton Creamery Association," in Burleigh County, North Dakota, which will begin operations by August 10, 1902, by which 25 Jewish farmers in Burleigh and McLean counties will be greatly benefited.

    The officers and directors of the society are: President, Adolph Loeb; Vice-President, Dr. Emil G. Hirsch; Treasurer, Edward Rose; Recording Secretary, Leopold Gans; Corresponding Secretary, Rabbi A. B. Levy, 15 York St., Chicago, Illinois. Directors: Israel Cowen, Henry N. Hart, Adolph Moses, Julius Rappaport, Julius Rosenwald and Emanuel I. Selz.

    NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. THE JEWISH AGRICULTURISTS' AID SOCIETY OF AMERICA. (pp.116 - 118.) The Biennial Meeting of the Jewish Agirculturists' Aid Society of America was held January 6, 1902, at Chicago, ...

    Jewish
    V A 2, II D 10, III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- January 23, 1904
    (No headline)

    From the report submitted at the annual meeting of the Jewish Agriculturists' Aid Society -

    80 families have been encouraged and assisted to settle on farms during 1903. The number of individuals assisted was 802. By nationality, 48 of the 80 parties were Russian, 14 were Roumanian, and the others Galicians and Hungarians. In all, the 80 families have taken up 10,957 acres of land.

    62 loans in sums from $100 to $1,000 have been made during the year to as many Jewish farmer-families. These loans aggregate $27,811.

    From the report submitted at the annual meeting of the Jewish Agriculturists' Aid Society - 80 families have been encouraged and assisted to settle on farms during 1903. The number ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, V A 2
  • American Jewish Year Book -- September 09, 1904
    Edited by Cyrus Adler

    NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. The Jewish Agriculturists' Aid Society of America. (Pp.137-138.)

    The activity of this organization has assumed noteworthy proportions. During 1902, fifty-six families, consisting of 302 individuals, were assisted to establish themselves on farms in the States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, and in the Territory of Oklahoma. Thirty-four of these families have filed homestead claims on free government land, each taking 160 acres of land. Ten families purchased as many farms in the States of Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. These farms vary in size from 40 to 120 acres; the aggregate amount paid for these farms was $13,780. Twelve families located on rented farms in the States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Iowa, and Minnesota. The renters are working an aggregate of 1,210 acres, and the aggregate rent of these twelve farms is $4,160 annually.

    Loans to the amount of $19,365.82 have been made by the Society during the year 1902, and the title loans outstanding January 1, 1903, were $27,182.12. The aggregate amount repaid during the year 1902, by the Society's proteges on loans made to them by the Society was $5,806.86.

    2

    During the first six months of the present year, the Society assisted 67 families to take up farming as their vocation. Fifty-three of these families have filed homestead claims of 160 acres each in the States of North and South Dakota, and in Missouri. Five have purchased farms in the States of Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin, and nine have rented farms in Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa. Loans to the amount of $25,415 have been made by the Society during this period of time to its proteges.

    In all, the Society had, on July 1, 1903, assisted 228 families to establish themselves as agriculturists. The Society's proteges are located not only in Northwestern States, but as far South as Florida, and as far West as Nevada. The largest number, 95 families, is located in the Dakotas. Michigan comes next with 41 families; Illinois and Wisconsin, with 19 each; Minnesota, 16; Indiana, 15; Iowa, 12. Four families are located in Missouri; Nevada and Oklahoma have each three families; and one family is located in Florida.

    More than 15,000 acres of government land have been taken up as homesteads; title has been acquired upon 5,760 acres of these lands by 36 settlers. The estates of these Jewish farmers, including their live-stock, which counts up 3into the hundreds, or horn cattle and horses, and their implements, represent a value of more than $100,000.

    The Society raises its funds for making loans to its proteges by means of "Loan Certificates," which the Society issues in denominations of $10 and upwards. Certificates are redeemable after ten years from date of issue or before that time at the option of the Society, and bear interest at the rate of 3% per annum, payable January 1. The money realized from the sale of these certificates constitutes the "Loan Fund" of the Society. This fund is used for no purpose other than making loans to Jewish farmers. The current expenses of the Society are covered from a general fund contributed by members of the organization and by the Associated Charities of Chicago.

    The officers and directors of the Society are: President, Adolph Loeb; Vice-President, Dr. Emil G. Hirsch; Secretary, Hugo Pam; Treasurer, Edward Rose; Corresponding Secretary, A. R. Levy, 1180 Douglas Bldg., Chicago, Ill.; Directors: Louis Becker, Israel Cowen, Leopold Gans, Henry N. Hart, Adolph Moses, Dr. M. Phaelzer, Rev. J. Rappaport, Julius Rosenwald, Emanuel F. Selz, Morris Weil, all of Chicago, Illinois.

    NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. The Jewish Agriculturists' Aid Society of America. (Pp.137-138.) The activity of this organization has assumed noteworthy proportions. During 1902, fifty-six families, consisting of 302 individuals, were assisted to ...

    Jewish
    III G, V A 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 01, 1907
    (No headline)

    The "Yankee" of Jefferson Street.

    Wisdom, views, thoughts, and perhaps oddities, as told by a Jew who himself speaks half "Yankeeish" and half Jewish and who looks at the world from a semi-Yankee point of view.

    If you believe that the Jews - nation, people, religious sect or whatever you may wish to call them - have varied interests and differ greatly, you are sadly mistaken. They are the same whether you meet them quietly sipping their tea, in a coffee shop, in a restaurant, playing pinochle or manipulating chess characters on a chess board.

    True, Jewish children just as other people's children are divided into many groups and classes. Observe Jewish newspaper writers at their work, observe them again in a debate, and you shall see that the Jewish people are fertile with new ideas and reforms, and their lives are not completely restricted by the Rabbinical "thou shalts" and "thou shalt 2nots." And this same spirit prevails not only among newspaper theorists, but among practically every day people whom you readily meet in restaurants, saloons, and coffee shops.

    Observe, especially, these brothers of ours as they sit at a glass of tea or at a goulash or chess board. Everything seems to be forgotten and a feeling of unity prevails as they sit concentrated at their moment of interest. National distinctions are obliterated. There exists no longer, a "Galitzioner," or a "Litvak," or a Rumanian or Pole. He is no longer the worker, or the boss, the Socialist, the Zionist or the bourgeois.

    We propose to those who wish to abolish classes among Jews to start an energetic, scientific natural, "tea - coffee - goulash - pinochle - chess" movement and their problem shall be solved. We do not mean that movement should carry a six-fold nomenclature such as the one we suggested. They surely could find a better, more fitting, and acceptable name if they tried. The name should be simple and may or may not be scientific.

    3

    I would like to tell you of one restaurant which I thought was frightfully bourgeois, but which upon inspection turned out to be a center for radicals. I had started to tell you of the Yankee from Jefferson street who greatly aroused my interest, but I slipped off into the realm of science. I met this very interesting Yankee in a restaurant the name of which I will not divulge but which I shall try to describe adequately hoping perhaps that I will thereby earn a free glass of tea or the like. This restaurant with a thoroughly bourgeois reputation aroused my interest and I decided to see for myself. The bourgeois, are there represented by a lawyer without a practice, by a doctor about to get his degree, and an advertising agent who talks of his business deals but makes none. As a result, neighborliness permeated the atmosphere through out, and the atmosphere of the "Jefferson Street Yankee" effloresces with the spirit of unity.

    The conversations prevailing run high, wide and various. Many are those debating whether or not the Jew should retain Yiddish as his language, this by speakers who speak both a broken Yiddish and a broken English.

    4

    It appears that the Jefferson Street Yankee is sort of conciliator between the many views, theories, programs and strivings in Judaism. This Yankee is usually a peddler but believes in working hard. This gives him the opportunity to work lightly, to take easy and to work in a natural manner. It affords an opportunity to express many views on Jewish topics and .....

    However, I feel my readers now have a sufficient inkling of my conversations with this Jefferson Street Yankee.

    M. Zipin.

    The "Yankee" of Jefferson Street. Wisdom, views, thoughts, and perhaps oddities, as told by a Jew who himself speaks half "Yankeeish" and half Jewish and who looks at the world ...

    Jewish
    V A 2
  • Record-Herald -- February 08, 1909
    Dedicate Hospital for White Plague Victims Chicago Winfield Farm Scene of Appropriate Exercises Monument to Zeal of Hebrew Women

    In the dedication yesterday afternoon of the Chicago-Winfield Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Winfield, Illinois, the Jewish women of Chicago scored a distinct triumph.

    It marks the first efforts of the Jews of Chicago to care for the consumptive members of their race, and to the women is given the credit for originating the idea. Without their energetic efforts, which resulted in the opening of the institution six months after the purchase of the property, it is conceded that the sanitarium would still be visionary.

    The two women who are given the greatest credit for the new sanitarium 2are Mrs. Joseph Fish and Mrs. Emma B. Mandel. By common consent Mrs. Fish was given the position of honor yesterday, presiding at the exercises, introducing the prominent speakers and having general charge of the afternoon's program.

    The institution which is nonsectarian is located on a twenty-acre fruit farm twenty-eight miles west of Chicago & Northwest Railroad. The main building was formerly a rest cure. The property was purchased and alternations made at an expense of about $28,000 most of which was secured through the personal solicitation of the women. The dedication ceremonies was attended by 600 representative Chicago Jews, who went on a special train.

    After an inspection of the buildings and grounds Mrs. Fish introduced Dr. Emil G. Hirsch, who told of the peculiar susceptibility of the Jews to consumption, mostly due to the life that they were compeelled to live in Russia and their enforced employment in sweatshops after arrival in this country. He declared that the Winfield institution was to be educational as well as curative and that patients would be taught how to take care of themselves 3and prevent the spreading of the disease germs.

    Carl Stonehill, president of the association, presented the sanitarium to Health commissioner W. A. Evans with the understanding that it was always to be under the control of the Chicago-Winfield Association. In reply Dr. Evans congratulated the Jews on their fraternalism and the success with which they met difficult problems of distress among their own people.

    He disagreed with Dr. Hirsch and believed that the educational results of such private sanitariums would be so great that the legislature would wake up and render assistance.

    In the dedication yesterday afternoon of the Chicago-Winfield Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Winfield, Illinois, the Jewish women of Chicago scored a distinct triumph. It marks the first efforts of the Jews ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, V A 2
  • Record-Herald -- February 08, 1909
    Dedicate Hospital for White Plague Victims Chicago Winfield Farm Scene of Appropriate Exercises Monument to Zeal of Hebrew Women

    In the dedication yesterday afternoon of the Chicago-Winfield Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Winfield, Illinois, the Jewish women of Chicago scored a distinct triumph.

    It marks the first efforts of the Jews of Chicago to care for the consumptive members of their race, and to the women is given the credit for originating the idea. Without their energetic efforts, which resulted in the opening of the institution six months after the purchase of the property, it is conceded that the sanitorium would still be visionary.

    The two women who are given the greatest credit for the new sanitarium are Mrs. Joseph Fish and Mrs. Emma B. Mandel. By common consent Mrs. Fish was given the position of honor yesterday, presiding at the exercises, introducing the prominent speakers and having general charge of the afternoon's program.

    2

    The institution which is nonsectarian is located on a twenty-acre fruit farm twenty-eight miles west of Chicago on the Chicago & Northwest Railroad. The main building was formerly a rest cure. The property was purchased and alterations made at an expense of about $28,000, most of which was secured through the personal solicitation of the women. The dedication ceremonies were attended by 600 representative Chicago Jews, who went on a special train.

    After an inspection of the buildings and grounds Mrs. Fish introduced Dr. Emil G. Hirsch, who told of the peculiar susceptibility of the Jews to consumption, mostly due to the life that they were compelled to live in Russia and their enforced employment in sweatshops after arrival in this country. He declared that the Winfield institution was to be educational as well as curative and that patients would be taught how to take care of themselves and prevent the spreading of the disease germs.

    Carl Stonehill, president of the association, presented the sanitarium to Health commissioner W. A. Evans with the understanding that it was always to be under the control of the Chicago-Winfield Association. In reply Dr. Evans congratulated the Jews on their fraternatism and the success with which they met difficult problems of distress among their own people.

    3

    He disagreed with Dr. Hirsch and believed that the educational results of such private sanitariums would be so great that the legislature would wake up and render assistence.

    In the dedication yesterday afternoon of the Chicago-Winfield Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Winfield, Illinois, the Jewish women of Chicago scored a distinct triumph. It marks the first efforts of the Jews ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, V A 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 03, 1909
    Chicago Jews Are Becoming Farmers

    Dr. A. R. Levy, left Chicago yesterday with the first group of Jews who wish to settle themselves on farms in the Southeastern part of the state of Georgia. The first group of Jews, who left for their new home in Georgia, consists of Mr. A. Weinberg, 1473 W. 12th Street, who was born in Pantse, Rumania, who has been in this country 18 months, and is a shoemaker by trade; Mr. S. Keline, who is a carpenter by trade, came here from Bolosov, Russia, he lives now at 1301 Morgan Street, and 18 years in Chicago.

    These two gentlemen represent ninety-two Jewish people who desire to immigrate to the state of Georgia and to settle on farms. There is a second group waiting to see the results of the first group before they follow.

    Dr. A. R. Levy, left Chicago yesterday with the first group of Jews who wish to settle themselves on farms in the Southeastern part of the state of Georgia. The ...

    Jewish
    III G, V A 2, III A