The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • [Association documents] -- October 22, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Rev. Dr. Kohler from Detroit, desires to know whether or not he should come here the beginning of November to enter upon his duties as minister of the congregation.

    It was then moved and carried unanimously that a telegram should be sent at once to the Doctor, that it was the wish of all the members of the Board of Directors that he should enter upon his official duties with the Sinai Congregation on the first of November, next.

    Moved and carried that a committee be appointed to procure a place of worship by the first of November.

    Rev. Dr. Kohler from Detroit, desires to know whether or not he should come here the beginning of November to enter upon his duties as minister of the congregation. It ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- October 22, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his house, store and factory, and whereas Mr. G. Eliel is endeared to us for his great devotion to the congregation, and we have learned him to be a kind-hearted and wholesouled man, therefore be it:

    Resolved: That the Board of Directors deeply regrets the misfortune which has befallen their president and hereby express their heartfelt sympathy for him and his family.....

    The following resolution was offered......(and) was unanimously carried. Whereas our worthy President Mr. G. Eliel has been a great sufferer in the late conflagration, the raging flames having visited his ...

    Jewish
    IV, II A 2
  • Chicago Times -- October 24, 1871
    No Nonsense

    The talk about Mr. Henry Greenebaum as Mayor of Chicago is ridiculous. If it were not probably intended merely as a joke, apropos of the conflagration, it would be abominable. It is not necessary to point out the utter impropriety of suggesting any such unfit person as Mr. H. Greenebaum for an office which, in this emergency, demands the highest order of abilities, the most comprehensive understanding, and the most unquestionable purity and integrity.

    The talk about Mr. Henry Greenebaum as Mayor of Chicago is ridiculous. If it were not probably intended merely as a joke, apropos of the conflagration, it would be abominable. ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- November 19, 1871
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A quorum being present, a motion was made to suspend the rules in order to accept the petition of Leon Mandel for membership. Carried....Leon Mandel was then elected member of the Chicago Sinai Congregation.

    A quorum being present, a motion was made to suspend the rules in order to accept the petition of Leon Mandel for membership. Carried....Leon Mandel was then elected member of ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- February 26, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Special meeting of the board...., for the purpose of electing Jacob Weil as a member of the congregation. Upon motion, J. Weil was elected a member of our congregation.

    Special meeting of the board...., for the purpose of electing Jacob Weil as a member of the congregation. Upon motion, J. Weil was elected a member of our congregation.

    Jewish
    IV
  • Chicago Times -- January 17, 1875
    Biographical Sketch of Rabbi Bernhard Felsenthal, Ph. D

    Among the scholars who occupy Chicago pulpits, Rev. Bernhard Felsenthal, the subject of this sketch, stands almost pre-eminent and he has the proud satisfaction of knowing that his talents are thoroughly appreciated, not only by the educated and liberal minds of his own faith, but by all classes whose appreciation is not obscured by sectarian prejudices.

    Mr. Felsenthal was born January 2, 1822, in Muenchweiler, in the Palatinate. Having absorbed all that the schools of his native place could offer, he repaired at an early age to Kaiserslautern. After finishing a preliminary academic course, he sought that famous place of learning, Munich. There he continued his path to knowledge, receiving instruction from the best master, and enjoying the fellowship of many of the best youths of the country.

    The fact of his Jewish descent debarred him from giving his service to the state, as Bernhard's father intended he should. At the age of twenty, having concluded his studies, and desiring no longer to be a burden upon his father, he struck out in an independent way, and sought a position as teacher, and was not long in securing one.

    2

    While thus engaged in a quiet German village, he continued to pursue his studies. He devoted his especial attention to Oriental languages and literature. Having made himself a thorough master of Hebrew he passed down the philological mine to the bed-rock of Sanscrit, and explored the mysteries of knowledge therein revealed. Always a laborious student, his exclusion from an active life made him a thorough bookworm, but did not affect the clearness of his intellect or independence of character.

    In the summer of 1854 Dr. Felsenthal left his Fatherland for the United States. Having friends near of kin in Indiana, he directed his steps to the Hoosier state, but there was nothing among the Hoopoleites to attract or call in demand such a man as the doctor, and in 1858 he came to Chicago, an entire stranger. Here he soon found employment in the bank of the Greenebaum brothers. The work was not altogether congenial to one of a studious turn of mind, but necessity is a hard teacher and kept him at it for three years. His leisure hours, especially in the evening, were still devoted to study, and while there was no demand for his lore, he still continued to store it away, as it might be handy to have in the head some day.

    Meanwhile his erudition had become recognized among his brethren of the old faith.

    3

    Soon after his arrival in Chicago, a number of liberal Israelites had formed a society under the name of Jewish Reform Association, its object being indicated by name. Of this society Dr. Felsenthal was chosen secretary, and, although of a retiring disposition, he soon became the recognized leader and the inspiring soul of the organization. This organization was the means of exercising a most potent influence for liberal Judaism throughout the entire northwest.

    In 1859 the doctor published a work under the title "Regarding Jewish Reform." The work was most favorably received, both by the Jewish masses and by many of its most advanced thinkers and severest critics. They all united in paying to the modest and the obscure author high encomiums for soundness of views, profound research, and an earnest spirit underlying and pervading the entire work.

    The organization of the Reform Association, together with the labors of the doctor, soon gave liberal Judaism a strong foothold in the western metropolis, and in due time, a Reform Synagogue rose on Monroe Street, between Clark and La Salle, of which Dr. Felsenthal was chosen rabbi. The organization was known as Sinai. Subsequently the congregation moved to the old Plymouth Congregational church, corner of Van Buren Street and Third Avenue.

    4

    The official connection of the doctor with this society continued three years, when he received and accepted a call from Zion church, then located on Desplaines, near Washington Street. He is at the head of this congregation, but the "temple" has been removed to the corner of Jackson and Sangamon streets.

    Among his published works is one on the Jewish school system in America, and an admirable Hebrew grammar, acknowledged by scholars to stand among the best works of its kind.

    The abilities and erudition of Dr. Felsenthal have been honorably recognized by various societies and institutions. The historical society of this city, in 1863, elected him a corresponding member, and the Chicago University has given him the "Philosophical Doctor," an honor never before bestowed on a Hebrew divine by an American college.

    Among the scholars who occupy Chicago pulpits, Rev. Bernhard Felsenthal, the subject of this sketch, stands almost pre-eminent and he has the proud satisfaction of knowing that his talents are ...

    Jewish
    IV
  • [Association documents] -- April 30, 1875
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Resignation of Leon Mandel and H. Rosenblatt were presented and the Secretary, on motion, requested to inform these gentlemen that their respective resignations cannot be entertained before the amount of their respective subscriptions toward the Building Fund is liquidated.

    Resignation of Leon Mandel and H. Rosenblatt were presented and the Secretary, on motion, requested to inform these gentlemen that their respective resignations cannot be entertained before the amount of ...

    Jewish
    V B, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 21, 1875
    The Sinai Congregation

    The Jewish Sinai congregation celebrated the laying of the cornerstone of the new temple at the southeast corner of Indiana Avenue and 21st Street--diagonally opposite from the First Presbyterian Church. Nearly all the members of the Jewish congregation as well as many visitors were present and the festival proceeded in an unostentatious but dignified manner.

    The building plans combine beauty with utility and the temple will therefore be an excellent architectural addition to the other churches in the vicinity. The temple covers an area of ninety by one hundred feet and its height, to the gable, is eighty-one feet. The dome which is to surmount the structure will reach 130 feet above the street level.

    The building will have a spacious basement beneath the temple hall. The lower part will have a fourteen-foot ceiling and is to serve as a lecture hall and Sunday-school room. One room is to be used as a library and everything 2will be furnished comfortably and elegantly.

    The entire floor above the basement will form the temple hall, which is to be panelled in wood. Light will filter through windows of artistically stained glass.

    A nice gallery above the east entrance will accommodate visitors.

    The organ, etc., are to be on the west side.

    The entrances to the temple will not only have as practical an arrangement as possible, but, if the designs are followed, will also be imposing and splendid.

    The rabbis will have special studies, dressing rooms, and other accommodations in the building.

    3

    The temple will contain four large hot-air furnaces, connected with a ventilating system, which will provide heat in winter and fresh air in summer.

    The exterior of the temple will show a marked contrast to other local churches, since the walls will form straight, uninterrupted lines, thus giving an appearance of simplicity. The monotonous surface will be relieved only by the gracefully formed windows and the tower. The slate roof will be like a Greek cross in form.

    The masonry will consist of roughhewn limestone. The total cost is estimated at seventy-five thousand dollars. Architect [Dankmar] Adler will supervise the construction.

    The festivities to celebrate the laying of the cornerstone were very simple and dignified, since the congregation, with its modern tendencies, dispensed with the rather old-fashioned Jewish custom of making an elaborate display.

    4

    Dr. [K.] Kohler gave the sermon in English, and a few suitable remarks were made by B. Loewenthal, president of the congregation, and by several other gentlemen.

    The church choir sang a few appealing and inspiring selections.

    Copies of the local daily papers and of Jewish periodicals from all parts of the country, a history of the congregation and a list of its members were sealed in the cornerstone.

    The Sinai congregation will continue, at present, to hold its religious services at Martin's Hall, at the corner of Twenty-Second Street and Indiana Avenue, until the new temple is completed.

    The officials of the congregation are as follows: B. Loewenthal, president; H. Meyers, vice-president; H. Felsenthal, secretary; M. Ryder, treasurer, and 5Dr. Kohler, rabbi.

    The congregation was founded in 1860 and has enjoyed constant growth since that time. The present membership consists of 110 families.

    The Jewish Sinai congregation celebrated the laying of the cornerstone of the new temple at the southeast corner of Indiana Avenue and 21st Street--diagonally opposite from the First Presbyterian Church. ...

    Jewish
    III C, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 07, 1877
    Henry Greenebaum

    A Tribune reporter yesterday morning called upon Mr. Henry Greenebaum at his bank on Fifth Avenue to get from him an explanation of the apparent deficiency shown in the expert's report, made from the books of the West Park Commission, and published in yesterday's Tribune.

    Said the reporter: "I want you Mr. Greenebaum, to give me a brief explanation of the reports published in this morning's Tribune."

    "My dear sir," responded the gentleman, "I am glad you came; but, really, there is nothing to explain, or even worth noticing. However, in justice to myself, I will say that my accounts are correct in every particular."

    A Tribune reporter yesterday morning called upon Mr. Henry Greenebaum at his bank on Fifth Avenue to get from him an explanation of the apparent deficiency shown in the expert's ...

    Jewish
    IV, I F 6
  • Chicago Tribune -- December 08, 1877
    Henry Greenebaum

    When it became known at the bank that the concern would be put into the hands of a Receiver, the small army of depositors who were to draw out money, and had been told that they could not get,it, looked a little blue about the gills, so to speak, but the more intelligent of them had little to say, except that they believed Mr. Greenebaum had done the best that he could; that they were sorry for him, and especially for themselves, and that they had no doubt the best thing that could be done for the bank was to turn it over to a Receiver, and let him wind it up. There were others among them who couldn't understand it. They appeared to be a good deal dazed, and sat around on the hard benches, or stood up in little knots around the room, asking each other what it all meant. By-and-by it began to dawn on them that the bank would pass out of Mr. Greenebaum's hands, and into the hands of the Court.

    When it became known at the bank that the concern would be put into the hands of a Receiver, the small army of depositors who were to draw out money, ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, IV