The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 24, 1881
    [Plan to Aid Agriculture in Palestine]

    A well attended Jewish meeting took place yesterday to discuss a plan to assist Jews engaged in agriculture in Palestine. The speakers were Rev. Stampfer, a proud Magyar by birth, who lived in Jerusalem since his early childhood; Dr. Hirsch, and Dr. Felsenthal. The meeting was opened by Mr. Peabody. The lecturers, Dr. Felsenthal, Rev. Stampfer, and Dr. Grossman, spoke about conditions in Palestine, giving special emphasis to the pressure to which the Israelites are subjected there. This was followed by a proposal to found a society for the support of those engaged in agricultural work in Palestine.

    Mr. Peabody was elected President, Mr. Henry Greenebaum, Vice-President; and Dr. Felsenthal, Secretary of the new organization.

    A well attended Jewish meeting took place yesterday to discuss a plan to assist Jews engaged in agriculture in Palestine. The speakers were Rev. Stampfer, a proud Magyar by birth, ...

    Jewish
    III H, II B 2 g, I L, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1881
    Jews Hold Council

    The Union of Jewish Communities of America held its session again yesterday forenoon at ten o'clock in Standard Hall. After attending to preliminary business the local rabbis extended an invitation to the delegates to take a coach trip and see the city. A lengthy debate ensued about the executive board's recommendation to raise half a million dollars for a Jewish college. Various delegates were of the opinion that the institution should be located in New York, and others believed it made no difference whether such a college was in New York, New Orleans, Cincinnati, or any other city, as long as it served as a university for rabbis throughout the United States. Finally the resolution was adopted to procure the money, but the problems of how to raise it, and where the institution should be located, were referred to the executive board for decision.

    In the afternoon session the chairman of the special committee read a detailed account of the persecution of Jews in Russia, whereupon a committee 2was appointed to raise money and to offer asylum in America to the banished people of Russia as well as to those who had fled. In order to facilitate emigration from Russia Mr. Abraham sought support from the many secret Jewish organizations.

    A. W. Rich considered the immigration and settlement question an important issue, which from the historical standpoint may become as significant as the exodus from Egypt. He was of the opinion that the secret organizations should help procure for every Jewish immigrant a completely equipped farm of a hundred acres, including livestock, in Nebraska or Kansas, exempt from payments of any kind for seven years, since thereby it would be possible for the settler to become a self-supporting landowner within a short time.

    The Union of Jewish Communities of America held its session again yesterday forenoon at ten o'clock in Standard Hall. After attending to preliminary business the local rabbis extended an invitation ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, II D 10, I A 2 a, III C, III G, III H, I L
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 02, 1909
    A Fine Opportunity for Jewish Boys

    Dr. David Blaustein, the Superintendent of the Hebrew Institute, has undertaken the task of representing the National Farm School of Book County, Pennsylvania, in Chicago, although he is already overburdened with many responsibilities. At the national farm school Jewish boys are taught modern agriculture. Dr. Kreiskop, who urged Dr. Blaustein to accept the appointment as Chicago's representative, promised him that Jewish boys from Chicago who wish to learn agriculture at the school will be given preferred consideration. Parents who are uncertain about a future for their sons should by no means overlook this opportunity, and should file an application with Dr. Blaustein. Since only a few weeks remain until June 1, the date set for the commencement of the new semester, parents should not delay in filing an application for their sons. Pupils will not be accepted after June 1.

    Everyone should know something about agriculture. Farming and cultivation of the soil are very interesting occupations. Jews, in particular, should be interested in agriculture. Our forefathers, before the Exile, were farmers.

    2

    We expect to return to our land and be farmers.

    Agriculture is the noblest and healthiest of all occupations. It builds strong and healthy men and women. We need a strong and healthy generation. If anything will increase our strength and national pride, it undoubtedly will be agriculture.

    Dr. David Blaustein, the Superintendent of the Hebrew Institute, has undertaken the task of representing the National Farm School of Book County, Pennsylvania, in Chicago, although he is already overburdened ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, I L, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 11, 1914
    The Planting Holiday (Editorial)

    Our forefathers were once a people chiefly composed of tillers of the soil. That historical epoch having vanished long ago, we can hardly sympathize with our forefathers' naive joy over nature and close affinity to everything that sprouts and blossoms.

    Yet all our holidays are closely related to the natural elements of the country in which our forefathers became a race. Our holidays of sowing, ripening, and reaping have little significance in the countries in which we now live and earn our livelihood. Our ancient prayers for dew and rain, as well as most of our laws and traditions, have a meaning only in the country of our patriarchs.

    2

    To us who live outside of the Jewish homeland, the new year's day of trees, called Chamisho Oser B'Shvat is merely a bygone memory of the bountiful, prolific natural life of our forefathers on the mountains and in the valleys of Palestine. [Chamisho Oser B'shvat is the 15th day of the 5th month in the Jewish calendar, corresponding to parts of January and February. It is a day set aside to plant trees, similar to Arbor Day.-Tr.]

    When the Palestinian winters and the rainy season blow over; when from the clear blue sky, a bright warm sun begins to shine and the fertile soil sends forth its first envoy to notify the children who inhabit it that spring is on its way, on that day, Chamisho Oser B'Shvat, our patriarchs would go out into their gardens and fields to decorate the revivifying 3mother earth with a new wreath of fresh trees.

    All this was when Jews were still an independent race and the possessors of their own gardens and fields. Now we are an urban element, even if we reside on farms. We are segregated from nature and no longer yearn for the life of trees and flowers.

    Nevertheless, we celebrate this holiday of Chamisho Oser B'Shvat just like all other traditional holidays. The rabbi said that we be merry and so we are merry. Many a Jew pronounces a benediction over carobs, dates, and other fruits which grow in Palestine, but very few remember the covenant at the waters of Babylon, and think of the country where grapes and oranges grow.

    There is only one place in the world where the planting holiday is observed in its whole splendor, and that is in the now modernized ancient country 4of the Jews. There in Palestine, where we have again revived the ancient bond between the Jewish people and nature, and animated the decrepit traditions and mores of an old agricultural people who had at one time dwelled in a country which they had named Land of Israel,-there, in Palestine, where the Jews have acquired anew the lingo of flowers and trees, there they celebrate Chamisho Oser B'Shvat, which is a tree arbor day.

    Our forefathers were once a people chiefly composed of tillers of the soil. That historical epoch having vanished long ago, we can hardly sympathize with our forefathers' naive joy over ...

    Jewish
    III B 3 b, I L, I C
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 18, 1914
    [Adv.]

    The Jewish Agricultural Aid Society of New York (Baron De Hirsh) has opened a branch in the Middle Western States, with offices at 706 W. 12th St., Room 207, Friends Bldg. Mr. George Simon, western representative of the Agricultural Aid Society, will give free consultation to all Jews who intend to settle on farms.

    The Jewish Agricultural Aid Society of New York (Baron De Hirsh) has opened a branch in the Middle Western States, with offices at 706 W. 12th St., Room 207, Friends ...

    Jewish
    I L
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 24, 1914
    The Literacy Test

    The Senate will soon vote on the Burnet Immigration Bill and the Literacy Test amendment, in which a demand is incorporated that every immigrant over sixteen years of age, male or female, must be able to read English or any other language, including Hebrew or Yiddish.

    If this bill should be adopted in the Senate by a two-thirds majority, the President of the United States will have no power to veto it.

    Those senators who are bitter foes of immigration are apparently exerting their influence on the other senators in order to gain the desired majority. They are doing this for two reasons: First, they fear that President Wilson will perhaps veto the bill; secondly, they intend to save the President from committing himself by gaining a two-thirds majority in the Senate, so that the President need not appear as a foe of immigration.

    2

    Hence, notwithstanding Wilson's declaration, shortly after the Burnet Bill was adopted in the House of Representatives, that he is against the Literacy Test, his friendship with the defenders of the bill has not been lessened in the least. We cannot, therefore, feel any too certain as to his own position on this question.

    The question of the immigration bill is now being discussed in the national press. Various savants express the opinion that the whole riffraff about limiting immigration flows from impractical sources, as the country has not reached the stage where its population exceeds its geographical boundaries. The United States has an area large enough to accommodate twice its present population, the truth being that only 27% of its territory is now settled.

    From a moral point of view, it is pointed out that the United States has absolutely no right to do this. The country proper consists of immigrants, children of immigrants, and descendants of immigrant forefathers. Had the doors of America been closed before, these foes of the immigrant would not 3be here today. It therefore stands to reason that the restriction of immigration is a moral crime.

    The foremost counterattack on the Immigration Bill comes from those who believe that every restriction on immigration procrastinates the economic development of the country. Compared with other countries, America is young and fallow. The agricultural status of this country is especially at a low ebb and, therefore, requires energetic and capable agriculturists.

    The most proficient farmers of the country, far from being Yankees, are of immigrant stock. We know that the best farmers of the country, under whose hands the Wild West has been transformed into a blooming grandeur, are immigrants. Now that the farmers' children are flocking to cities, it is imperative that the immigrants come to this country in order to develop the land and replace those who abandon their farms.

    4

    It is also an established fact that immigrants are working in coal, ore, and copper mines, and that only through the constant flow of immigration are the large industries able to carry on.

    The larger the population of the country, the broader its domestic market, for the greater the number of people, the larger becomes the number of products that are required. As a matter of course, let us say fifty years from now, the United States will have twice as many people as it has today and its domestic market will also be doubled. The general practice in every country is to develop the home market, the development of foreign trade being only secondary. Above everything, competition with other countries is too keen for foreign markets.

    The consensus of opinion is that the Literacy Test falls short of being what it is intended to be, and, if anything, it reveals that the Immigration Bill is not so much aimed at undesired immigrants as it is at immigration in general, for it is a fact that those who unfortunately had no opportunity to learn how to read and write in the countries from whence they came, can, 5however, become the best citizens in the United States. As it is known to all, in many European countries the system of education is so inadequate as to make it impossible for a great number of people to obtain an elementary education.

    It is a great mistake to think that a person who can read and write will make a better citizen than one who can't.

    Many criminologists have proved that the most vicious criminals are men possessing education.

    This is why all agree that the Literacy Test should not be adopted under any circumstances. Notwithstanding the fact that some of the senators are working zealously to win the support of a two-thirds majority to pass the bill, nearly everybody is of the opinion that they will not succeed, because such a measure would simply prove a boomerang to the Democratic Administration, which by no means would invite its own destruction, since 6the immigrants' votes play such an important role as to make any party think twice. And there is no doubt that were the Democrats to adopt this bill, their party will become an enemy of the immigrants.

    The present immigration bill is also superfluous because, as it is, we have already enough restrictions on immigration. Be it sufficient to mention that twenty thousand unfortunate immigrants were deported last year. The curious thing is that while all intellectuals attack the immigration bill only from the literacy angle, other odious clauses remain ignored. What is the reason for this? Do they concur with remaining clauses? Another article dealing with this shall follow.

    The Senate will soon vote on the Burnet Immigration Bill and the Literacy Test amendment, in which a demand is incorporated that every immigrant over sixteen years of age, male ...

    Jewish
    III G, III B 1, I F 3, I F 4, I L
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 01, 1914
    A Good Proposal (Editorial)

    Mr. T. V. Foderly, head of the Information Bureau of the Department of Immigration, has recently declared that during last year 19,891 immigrants turned to his division in search of work, especially agricultural work. He proposes that the government of the United States should consider the question of unemployment and establish local, as well as central bureaus of employment.

    He also revealed that 3,086 naturalized citizens sought information concerning work.

    Apparently, this proposal will be adopted by the government, because no other condition is so undesirable in this country as unemployment. Though we have a permanent industrial reserve army as large as the one in 2England, the system under which work is regulated is far worse than in any other country.

    Everyone knows how bad it is to depend upon private employment bureaus, which prosper on the unemployed. It stands to reason that private agencies do their best to skin every individual who fails into their clutches, and we often hear that besides swindling their victims by extorting their last few pennies, they never give the type of work they promise.

    Moreover, it has recently become known that these private agencies make matters worse for the unemployed by announcing that there is a great deal of work to be had in the cities where they operate, which in turn brings thousands and thousands of workers, from near and far, who become dependent upon the employment bureaus. Everyone can readily see that the more unemployed people there are in the city, the greater volume of business they do.

    Still another factor enters in that exposes the social weakness of the 3private agencies, namely, that they are a permanent tool in the hands of the bosses for the advantage of supplying strike-breakers. They often send workers to another city where a strike is in progress. These people, who invested money in agencies and in railroad tickets, are easily lured into becoming scabs, against their own will.

    It is therefore of the utmost importance that employment bureaus be in the hands of the government, which is closely in touch with all sections of the country, and the unemployed will know that they are not being deceived.

    A good beginning has already been made in New York. Notwithstanding that this task has been undertaken in such hard times, it is hoped that the New York Minicipal Bureau of Unemployment will accomplish a great deal on this field. If, however, free government bureaus were established throughout the entire land as a permanent institution, it would be a real consolation 4for the unemployed.

    A new inspiration will then become apparent. The mere fact of having the government come in contact with the unemployed would lessen unemployment in general.

    Mr. T. V. Foderly, head of the Information Bureau of the Department of Immigration, has recently declared that during last year 19,891 immigrants turned to his division in search of ...

    Jewish
    I L, I D 2 c
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 15, 1914
    Professor Oppenheimer Received Great Ovation

    He made it very clear for the audience how to develop cooporative colonies for the Jews in Palestine. The audience which came to the Hebrew Institute to hear the great Jewish economist, Franz Oppenheimer, was not very large but it was a very intelligent audience. He clearly stated and outlined his views on the matter of establishing cooporative colonies for the Jewish workers in Palestine......

    Mr. Nathan D. Kaplan was the chairman of the meeting and in a few words explained to the audience the object of Professor Oppenheimer's visit to Chicago. Judge Hugo Pam was one of the speakers and in his rather lengthy speech, he told the audience that the Jews everywhere have made great strides in agriculture. A nation without agriculture cannot exist and nothing can be developed when the land is not cultivated.

    2

    Professor Oppenheimer in his address first spoke in English and completed his speech in his mother tongue and concluded by saying, "My Jewish brethren, we have waited over two thousand years, so surely we can wait just a few more years to return to the promised land of our ancestors. We expect to get financial aid from all parts of the world and I am sure that the Jews of Chicago will do their share in helping to build our promised land."

    He made it very clear for the audience how to develop cooporative colonies for the Jews in Palestine. The audience which came to the Hebrew Institute to hear the great ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 g, II B 2 f, I D 2 c, III H, I L, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- July 26, 1914
    Silliness (Editorial)

    One of the greatest absurdities is that many of our so-called Jewish representatives, racking their brains over the news of the general English-speaking press, draw conclusions - in most cases which ever pays them best - about inclinations of these papers toward Jews. To these self-crowned Jewish leaders, all English-speaking newspapers, and their editors and news reporters, are divided into two camps - the philo-Semites and anti-Semites. They can not understand that the large majority of American journalists consider the Jews as ordinary people. And when treating any matter concerning Jews, it is discussed from the standpoint of the matter itself, and antipathy or sympathy to the entire Jewish nation is disregarded.

    2

    There are, among us, professional Jew-baiters and professional Jew-lovers, whose task is to interpret any remark or act by outstanding, non-Jewish newspaper men or organizations from a standpoint remunerative to them. Should any newspaper write about the success of a Jewish farmer's crops, our Jew-lovers become full of ecstasy and sing all sorts of praises to the the noted newspaper which is then regarded as being philo-Semitic. On the following morning our Jew-baiters find, in the same newspaper, an innocent three-line advertisement of a summer resort, specifying that "Jews are not wanted." And a rumpus is created calling that very same paper anti-Semitic, and its entire staff is said to have conspired, as the ancient Haman, Antochius, and Titus, to efface the Jewish name from the surface of the globe.

    It is understood that the two parties are, if not demogagues who purport to catch fish in muddy water, simple fools who don't know the difference between right and wrong. They do not know that, just as the office boy 3who accepted the anti-Semitic advertisement did not even bear in mind the Jewish question, likewise the story written about the famous Jewish crop did not come from one whose aim it was to show the world that the Jewish crop must be good because it comes from Jews.

    The latest bit of silliness that we have seen about this occurred in a Jewish-English weekly parochial paper in which a reformed rabbi takes the privilege of commenting on a few editorials, which were published in the Chicago Tribune, in which Jewish agriculturalists are lauded. After showering the editors with compliments, he goes on to say:

    "We are pleased to comment on the Chicago Tribune's standpoint on account of the erroneous opinion that prevails, viz., that this paper is innoculated with anti-Semitic poison."

    4

    According to the opinion of this rabbi, it seems that if the editorial writer of the Tribune did not think so highly of Jewish farmers, we could justly believe that the Tribune were anti-Semitic, although there are many Semites, true sons of Abraham, Jacob, and Isaac, who ardently believe that if the world were to depend upon Jewish farming, people would eat old iron instead of potatoes.

    It is not only foolish, but it is stupidity itself to think for a minute that the Tribune is anti-Semitic or anti-anything else, though the Jewish masses who are mostly foreigners will not agree with the opinion of the Tribune, which represents the American spirit about whatever concerns foreigners in general. And it is natural: The Tribune does not even agree with the ideas of the true, first Americans - the Indians.

    One of the greatest absurdities is that many of our so-called Jewish representatives, racking their brains over the news of the general English-speaking press, draw conclusions - in most cases ...

    Jewish
    I C, I L
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 09, 1915
    A Conversation with Mr. Seman, Director of Hebrew Institute

    "What does the Hebrew Institute do to develop the life of the ghetto Jew?" I asked Mr. Seman. "The Hebrew Institute helps to elevate the social conditions of the Jewish communities in Chicago," answered Mr. Seman. "This institute is much unlike all other similar institutions for immigrants. We not only teach them the American language and American history, but we acquaint them as much as possible with the general spirit and atmosphere of America. This institute molds the social life of Jewish immigrants. Here you will find Jews from various countries and cities; among them arises the sort of friendship which lasts a lifetime. In this institute the activities of the Jewish community is being improved continually. They organize their own clubs and entertainment evenings and create their own atmosphere.

    2

    "The Hebrew Institute," continued Mr. Seman, "is perhaps the first institute that not only throws its doors wide to everyone who wants to develop his capabilities, in the short time he has left after a days work, but develops the self-respect of all those who attend the institute, because the numerous activities are being directed by various club members who pay for what they get. Naturally things are arranged so as to enable anyone for a very small fee to attend any class they may choose. After all the Hebrew Institute is not exclusively an immigrant institution. When a Jewish immigrant enters he immediately acquires the feeling that he is not excluded from the rest of the world. He finds Jews of various colors and hues, he sees before him Americanized and native born Jews who, like himself, make use of the institute. It is easy to understand that this has a favorable effect upon the newcomer who has so much before him to go through in his new life. This attitude of democracy, which he finds in this institute, instills into the heart of the immigrant life and hope for better and more fortunate times."

    3

    "What does the institute do for the practical life of the Jewish community?" I asked Mr. Seman. "The institute will in a short time do a great deal to improve the economic condition of the Jewish people in Chicago," answered Seman. "We will open for that purpose a large commercial department, where young fellows and girls will have the opportunity to learn bookkeeping, typewriting, and the business world in general. "It is a known fact that many are studying medicine, dentistry, and law, because they are under the impression that these professions are the best and most practical, but as a matter of fact, at the present there are many doctors, lawyers and dentists who do not earn enough for their subsistence, but the Jewish youth is still strange to the business world. When a Jewish boy or girl graduates from high school and if he or she possesses good business abilities, they will do much better as managers or expert bookkeepers.

    4

    "I know from my own experience," continued Mr. Seman, "of a large Jewish business house, where the manager receives three thousand dollars a year. The owner would much prefer a Jew in his place if there were a possibility of obtaining one.

    "Our commercial department will not limit itself with this. Our main task will be to give the Jewish boy or girl, who must go to work in an office or a store, an opportunity to receive the necessary experience, to enable them to make money from the start. The Hebrew Institute will, in the near future, also open an agricultural department with a laboratory. The task here will be a double one. First it will encourage every young man to learn agriculture, which is a very useful and healthy study inasmuch as it will bring the city Jewish youth in closer connection with nature. After studying several months in the agricultural department, each one will know whether he likes that department and whether he is capable of understanding it. Naturally many will choose this as their profession, and then continue learning it in some college.

    5

    "Second the mature Jew, who will want to buy a farm, will have the opportunity to learn farming in the Hebrew Institute. This alone is sufficient to enable everyone to understand that the Hebrew Institute is of practical value for the Jewish community. Here the spiritual as well as the physical strength of the Jewish community are being developed.

    "The institute also plays an important role in the Jewish home, inasmuch as new departments for women are constantly being opened. Everyone knows that the Jewish girls who work in the shops and factories can never learn to cook nor sew clothes for themselves. They simply don't have the opportunity to see their mothers cooking, as they work all day. It is possible that one of the most tragic features in the modern home is that the wife cannot cook, does not know of economy in food. But if the Jewish women will be given the possibility to learn cooking, this will improve the Jewish home. In the kitchen of our institute we do not teach how to make pies or other fancy cakes, but just to cook home cooked meals.

    6

    "Beside this it is important to know that our institute teaches women to sew their own clothes and clothes for children. It simply is cheaper and more practical for the mother and wife to sew clothes herself rather than give it to a dressmaker. This work will be a great help for the Jewish home. We also have many clubs which teach Yiddish reading and writing. The young Maccabees is a club consisting of seventy-five young Jewish girls who even write their minutes in Yiddish. The singing college has also become a part of the institute and their task is to spread Jewish songs and Jewish melodies among the Jewish people."

    "What does the Hebrew Institute do to develop the life of the ghetto Jew?" I asked Mr. Seman. "The Hebrew Institute helps to elevate the social conditions of the Jewish ...

    Jewish
    I A 3, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, III A, I L, IV