The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Occident -- June 18, 1885
    Meeting of the Young American Hebrew Association.

    A special meeting of the Chicago branch of the Young American Hebrew Association was held last night at 134 Pacific Avenue for the purpose of greeting Mr. David Stickles, the general agent sent out here from New York for the purpose of perfecting the Chicago organization and placing it upon a higher plane.

    The association is national, and there is a branch in every city in the United States, but for some reason this branch has not met expectation. It has, however, been organized but three months, and has done some good work in that time. Its objects are to assist the deserving, no matter what their nationality or color; unemployed men are given work or found transportation to other cities where they think they can find employment. Others are given outfits of goods to sell and so forth.

    2

    The organization here has spent about $50 in three months; found work for several and assisted many to get to other places. But the object of Mr. Stickles' visit is to suggest and devise means whereby its labors may become more effective. There is an internation association in London. Sir Moses Montefiore and Baron Rothschild being interested in it. Nothing definite was settled upon at this meeting, but steps will be at once taken toward securing a permanent location for the headquarters, which have hitherto been located at 134 Pacific Avenue.

    A special meeting of the Chicago branch of the Young American Hebrew Association was held last night at 134 Pacific Avenue for the purpose of greeting Mr. David Stickles, the ...

    Jewish
    III E, II D 8
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 10, 1900
    A Great Result

    The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association was hard at work to make this year's charity ball, the nineteenth since the establishment of the organization, the grandest in the way of entertainment as well as the greatest financial success. This expectation was fulfilled in every way to the great satisfaction of the Association. At this early hour no correct figures can be given, but it was estimated that the net proceeds would exceed $40,000 inclusive of the $10,000 auction sale of theatre boxes. The Association has announced, that 10% of this amount would be turned over to Mayor Harrison for distribution among the needy of the city and the rest will be distributed as usual among twenty-two charitable societies with Michael Reese hospital as the special beneficiary.

    .....As mentioned before, the auction of theatre boxes yielded a profit of $10,000 with the Standard Club as the highest bidder, paying $1,250.00 for the box and then, graciously refrained from the use of same. The Standard Club's example was followed by the Lakeside Club, Victor F. Lawson, the Chicago Tribune, and Oscar Foreman, who also returned the acquired boxes for a re-sale......

    The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association was hard at work to make this year's charity ball, the nineteenth since the establishment of the organization, the grandest in the way of ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, III E
  • Jewish Standard -- June 13, 1908
    Jewish Young Peoples Societies.

    Claremont Literary Society - President N. Schwartz.

    Hampden Club. - 333 Hampden Court. Bruno Heller, 1541 Oakdale Ave., Secretary.

    Harmonie Club - President, Theo Mayer.

    Henry George Club - Secretary, Alyce Abel - Club U. C. Lee I. Lemger. Sioux City, Iowa.

    Mark Twain Club - J. M. Kaplan, Secretary.

    Metropolitan Club - 42nd and Grand Blvd. H. T. Speisberger, 1440 Monadnock Block, Secretary.

    Phoenix Club - 478 Ashland Blvd. Manuel Asher, Secretary.

    2

    Ravisloe Club - Oscar M. Wolf, 1503 Schiller Bldg., Secretary.

    Standard Club - E. S. Hartman, 108 La Salle St., Secretary.

    Desoath Club - Alpha Chapter, Leroy L. Schloss, 674 48th Place, Secretary.

    Claremont Literary Society - President N. Schwartz. Hampden Club. - 333 Hampden Court. Bruno Heller, 1541 Oakdale Ave., Secretary. Harmonie Club - President, Theo Mayer. Henry George Club - Secretary, ...

    Jewish
    III E
  • The Sentinel -- September 08, 1911
    (No headline)

    A movement is on foot to organize what may be termed the Jewish Boy Scouts. It will resemble the Boy Scouts of America, but will be composed entirely of Jewish youths.

    It is not generally known that for several years past there have been similar organizations on the West Side, called the Volunteers of Zion, the Herzl Scouts, and the Rothschild Guards. These boys have regular drills and follow the lines of strict military discipline in conducting their societies.

    A movement is on foot to organize what may be termed the Jewish Boy Scouts. It will resemble the Boy Scouts of America, but will be composed entirely of Jewish ...

    Jewish
    III E
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 26, 1913
    The Youth Are Pro - Federation

    The Young Men's Federated Jewish Charities was organized as a result of a meeting which was held last Thursday evening in the Lawndale Club. More than two hundred of the Chicago Jewish youth became members. The purpose of this new organization is to unite the Jewish youth in order to create a better understanding among themselves, and, to support the Federation by soliciting and procuring subscribers.

    Al. H. Rosenberg acted as chairman of the meeting, Dr. Jacob Lebosky, Dr. Israel Klein, and Dr. Herman S. Meyer spoke on the necessity of a united youth for such an important cause as the Federation, and it was decided that a meeting should be held Sunday, February 9, in the Lawndale Club, at which officers will be elected. Al. H. Rosenberg, Arthur N. Hurvitz, Louis F. Jacobson, and Herman A. Schiff arranged this meeting.

    The Young Men's Federated Jewish Charities was organized as a result of a meeting which was held last Thursday evening in the Lawndale Club. More than two hundred of the ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, III E
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- July 14, 1913
    Adas Bnai Israel

    Very few readers know that a society of Jewish orthodox youth exists in Chicago under the name of Adas Bnai Israel of Chicago.

    Very little is heard about them. In winter they can be heard through small announcements in newspapers advertising a lecture. During the summer they are completely dormant.

    The present leaders of this society are apparently far from being business men. They can not and do not know how to popularize their society throughout the city. Most of them are members of a house of worship. Nevertheless, the society itself is very good and laudable in its mission.

    The Adas Bnai Israel was established according to the model of the New York Adas Bnai Israel. The founder's aim was to dissiminate the sublime ideals of Judaism. Their hall is a place for young people who have, at one time, studied and want to preserve whatever they acquired in Hebrew school and Yeshiva. All young men and women belonging to this society are workers and students, and yet they all observe the Sabbath. They are all modern orthodox Jews in the fullest sense of the word.

    On the Sabbath (Saturday) and holiday mornings they have their own quorum of 2worshipers, their own cantor and rabbi. Everything is conducted according to the traditional Jewish customs.

    It is grand to witness how a group get together on Sabbath and holiday afternoons, many extremely Americanized, and study assiduously in two separate departments. In one department, Pentateuch, Solomon, Yitzhaki's commentary, and the prophets are taught. In the other, Talmud. Their instructors are selected from their own group. From time to time they invite rabbis and other prominent speakers to address them.

    They are in possession of a few books. It can not be called a library. We do not know who donated these books. They lack books. Of those which they have, not one book is of modern literature.

    This society was organized by twelve young men who were graduates of the Yeshiva Eitz Chaim (Tree of Life Theological Seminary). Now the society has more than one hundred good-standing members.

    They all live in harmony. If anyone should be unemployed or lose his job on account of the Sabbath, all members are willing to help him in any possible way.

    In the beginning they held their meetings in the Yeshiva Eitz Chaim, afterwards in the Wood Street Talmud Torah. As they grew in numbers and became richer, 3they rented an apartment on 12th Street.

    In general, it is a good phenomenon. It shows that in this country, in America, where the chief aim of the average man is money, money and money, where the youth spend their time in dance halls, a Jewish movement, which is more than welcome, can spring up.

    Very few readers know that a society of Jewish orthodox youth exists in Chicago under the name of Adas Bnai Israel of Chicago. Very little is heard about them. In ...

    Jewish
    III E, I B 4
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 04, 1913
    The Marks Nathan Orphanage

    We bring to the readers of the Courier the entire report of Mr. Trotsky, the superintendent of the Marks Nathan Orphanage. Many times before has the Courier written about this important institution, but now we are giving all the facts regarding the good and the bad in the orphanage. It presents to the reader a clear and concise picture of the conditions in the institution and the state of the orphans. Let the reader peruse carefully the superintendent's report with its rich information and he will get the same idea.

    2

    "I wish to thank you for the confidence you have bestowed upon me in your choice for this important position and to assure you that I have accepted knowing all the difficult tasks thereof. May I point out that in so doing I have received not only the usual administration, the institution, but also, so to speak, the physical and spiritual well being of a large group of about 225 small children. Again, may I indicate, that in accomplishing my duties, I am responsible not only to you, but to the entire Jewish community of Chicago - perhaps to the city in general, because the children at present under my supervision will later be a part of the community and the general moral tone of that group, will, more or less, be influenced by the background that our children receive at present, by the ideas and ideals that are now being molded in their minds and in their hearts. Yes, with total understanding of my duties, 3I have begun, and wish to continue thus with hard work. This should be a sufficient guarantee of my future undertakings.

    "It is not my intention to make a long flowery speech, because, first of all, I am a person of action, not of speech; secondly, in this present day practical era, one is judged not by his promises, not even by his efforts, but by the results that only the future can bring. What I want to say is that if earnestness, alertness, devotion, steadfastness, and a practical knowledge of the position makes a person's work successful, I see no reason why my administration should not be successful.

    "Yet, honorably expended energies and constant decisions, although absolutely fundamental in bringing about success, can not 4and do not always assure and lead to this success. A good deal depends on cooperation, circumstances, and conditions. I am sorry to say that the circumstances and conditions existing at present in our home are, to say the least, far from elevating and encouraging. Our institution has physical shadows that are like rocks in the path of attaining a good administration, that hinder a good administration even more than just another obstacle. You must, therefore, accept it as natural and reasonable when I point to these dark clouds. Do not spare any energy to annihilate them as soon as possible. I well know that to do away with obstacles will require great sacrifices on your part. But I am also happy to know that the Executive is empowered to use all opportunities for improvement and I am a staunch supporter of the old saying, 'Where there is a will, there's a way.'

    5

    "The main trouble in our institution lies in two factors. First, the unfinished building, and second, the bad partnerships. I will not dwell very long on the results of an unfinished building. This will, as I understand, be shown by skilled workmen in their report to the Medical Board with whom I have already spoken. I will say, in short, that broken walls make a good place for dust and that unpaved, muddy playgrounds with stagnant puddles after the rain make cleanliness and health impossible. Just imagine this scene of 225 pairs of little feet running back and forth from the building to the mud puddles and vice versa.

    It might appear funny, but the white stones in the undecorated halls and the floors throughout the entire building bear proof that this is no laughing matter. Then too, the children's shoes are not waterproof 6and on a rainy day they become water soaked. This leads to colds and it is just short of a miracle that our hospital wards are not overcrowded with these sufferers. The sad appearing walls with broken plaster, although at present offering a broad field for the artistic abilities of the children, as their bold writings and engravings show, do not of course develop their refined or aesthetic abilities. The lack of furniture in the children's rooms has the same sad significance. A child should be made to feel as if he were in his own home, - not on some broken school bench, but in a comfortable, restful chair. The front of the house would also look better if there were trees and grass to relieve the striking contrast with the beautiful park across the street. All this means, naturally, money. But, it also means the making of the institution. It is an important matter and it should be worth your while to make this great sacrifice. Especially now when you are 7free from rent worries, you can and you must direct your activities in united efforts to raise the necessary funds.

    "By bad partnerships I mean, of course, the public schools and the Schul. This institution as you understand is built on the 'Double Wing' plan. One side is for boys only, the other, for the girls with all the comforts that they need. But the girls' wing was taken over for public school purposes, and their rooms were erected on the same side as the boys. This, of course, has made it very inconvenient for the girls in many ways. For instance, they have to take their shower baths in the public school wing, and then, directly from their hot baths, must run across a stone floor, which easily exposes them to colds. Besides, half undressed, they pass through the front hall and the boys' hall. We have grown boys and girls - this, to say the least does not raise our morale.

    8

    "Then again, to set aside eleven rooms, tends to crowd and inconvenience us. A dining room and dormitory are not sufficient rooms to rear children. They must also have study rooms, a recreation room, a gymnasium and an assembly room. All this they lack. The same is true of the Schul, which they must have to themselves for their own use without being disturbed by strangers. It should be definitely understood that our building has been constructed for the children and for them only. I hope that our present lease with the Board of Education will not be renewed. I am happy to know that our Executive is considering these matters earnestly and thoroughly, and I hope that you will give us your aid and approval in improving our condition. What we need at present is money, money, and money.

    "Money to color their entire education, money to accomplish our work as it should be done, money to improve our playgrounds, and money to install play rooms. That, I cannot give you. No superintendent can do this, it is your task.

    9

    "It is my pleasure to report that our children are happy here. Our home, as far as possible, is very much like a private home in which the children, to this extent, receive a natural home life. I am endeavoring to find a happy medium by exerting a little discipline. By discipline I do not mean, as you understand, heavy, burdensome rules and regulations, but, what I would call a natural discipline. That is to teach and instill industrious and purposeful habits, economy, punctuality, etc. This is especially important since we have no large playgrounds and our children are under the influence of the "Street." As our president at one time so cleverly expressed it: "Our home is at present a large Ghetto home." We wish to transform it into a harmonious, well regulated home which, of course, will require a certain amount of discipline. The club activities that have been established by my predecessor cannot be tendered enough praise. It works miraculously. I wish you could see the eagerness and impatience with which the girls look forward to their Tuesday club evening. They have all sorts of clubs, a piano club, 10a violin club, a dancing club, social clubs, a club of "Truthful Friends," and others with appropriate names. The club work, without doubt, greatly increases our electric bills. But at the same time, they elevate and make the childish hearts happy. Amusements help to refine childish natures. We must give them as many indoor pleasures and entertainments as possible, especially in the sad winter days.

    "All this was regarding the clubs of the girls only. Our boys are envious. I have, therefore, appealed to the Menorah Society of the Jewish students of the Chicago University, with the purpose of getting them to take up social club work with our boys every week-end. Our boys, we expect, will, thus, have their own athletic club shortly, as well as literary and debating societies which would be a huge step forward 11in developing their individualities and personal abilities that go into the making of the man. It also teaches self-control. Special attention will be given to physical culture. We Jews have devoted two thousand years to our minds. It is high time that we devoted some of our time to the development of good strong muscles. Our children, I am happy to say, love to read, so much so, that I found it necessary on my own accord to put deep green illumination in the dormitories. In the public school, they are diligent, attentive and ambitious, and are highly lauded by the principal. We have five boys and five girls in the high school, all of them are progressing well. The health of our children is quite satisfactory. In the last month, twenty-six were in the hospital, all suffering with light colds. This measure helps to prevent any further development of this malady. Please consider these colds that have developed due to the bad conditions of our playgrounds that I mentioned before, and yet you will find this number small.

    12

    "When I accepted this position there were 204 children, (127 boys and 77 girls). During the month seven boys left and fourteen boys and three girls entered, making a total of 214 in the home. Eleven more will soon be entered, completing the sum of twenty-five that were voted upon at the last meeting.

    "Regarding general management, much has been said and written about it recently. Many have criticised and condemned, others passed judgment on its good qualities. It was said that our expenses were too large compared with that of other institutions. That our household expenses are not dispensed in the most economical way. Naturally such reports are greatly exaggerated. As a newcomer, I know very little of the matter, but I can assure you that I shall study this problem thoroughly and bring 13expenses down to the most economic level, but not at any cost to the children. Our children use twice as much milk, butter and eggs as those at any other institution. Bless their little hearts! I believe in keeping them well fed. Feeding them well is one of the best investments for the children.

    "One point I have intentionally left for the last. That is their Jewishness and their Jewish education. I am not a rabbi nor the son of one but I am for a strong national Jew. And my greatest ambition is to see that our children grow up to be good Jews, not simply Jews, but Jews that know all about Judaism, Jews with Jewish thoughts and Jewish hearts. I am not satisfied with Sunday or Sabbath school Jews. I will bring all my energies to bear on the fact that our children should learn and know Judaism. Naturally, in the school everything is taught in English, but I hope that in time our Hebrew School will be the model one for all Chicago.

    14

    "I touched on many points. The rest I shall leave for some other time when I shall be more familiar with local affairs. I wish only to voice my hope that every member of the Board of Directors will cooperate and aid in this immense task that I have undertaken. Then and only then will my work be successful."

    We bring to the readers of the Courier the entire report of Mr. Trotsky, the superintendent of the Marks Nathan Orphanage. Many times before has the Courier written about this ...

    Jewish
    II D 4, I A 1 a, II B 2 f, II B 3, III E, III A
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 04, 1913
    The Young Jewish Verband.

    Last Sunday, in New York there was a gathering of 150 delegates representing eighty organizations of American Jewish Youth. They united into one group (the Verband) organizing as a national unit, with a national committee and a national council to regulate the work throughout the entire nation.

    The purpose of this uniting or Verband is to have all Jewish organizations, whose functions are social or educational in scope, work cooperatively under one basic idea and to help each other in words and deeds. The program, thus far, is limited, yet it carries the seed from which, in the near future, will blossom a mighty Jewish organization, that friend and foe will have to reckon with.

    2

    Let more and more national organizations be built, with any variety of objectives, yet in the end they will eventually intertwine into one large national organization, which will surpass the old Jewish organizations of Eastern Europe.

    Every Jewish community or Federation that is founded only on a single aim, such as to regulate Jewish charity or to control religious matters, will no sooner come into existence than its narrow undertakings will have to expand and sooner or later, whether voluntarily or involuntarily, it will have to take its stand on all Jewish problems and seek a solution for them.

    Among Jews it is especially difficult to limit our problems whether of the home, the synagogue, charity or national interests. The Jewish Talmud Torah (school) is not of interest to the synagogue Jew only.

    3

    Every Jew is interested in giving a Jewish education to the new generation and wishes to have a voice in the matter. And, when the New York community took under its supervision the Jewish education it had to contend with the demands of hundreds of thousands who, at first, were not thought to be in the least interested in Jewish problems.

    The same is true of the charity organizations. The old-fashioned hospitality has developed into a modern immigration home and the immigration questions are such that they cannot be solved by simply extending charity. It is related to the national problem of Jewish life everywhere and with political and economic conditions of Jews throughout the world. Such an old institution as alms giving, to become modern, to partake fundamentally in 4the Jewish migration question, must come in contact with all new Jewish problems from Nationalism to Zionism, that cannot be put aside with a smile or a threat. One feels this responsibility and diligently seeks to find a solution.

    The founding of a Charity Federation must sooner or later lead to the organization of a Jewish community that will embody in its active program all Jewish matters, and seek means to solve all those problems in our Jewish life. The organization of a Jewish community is the forerunner of a national organization. The fact alone, that Jews of various states gather to discuss Jewish problems, will in itself establish the true direction that seeks to find the root of all Jewish troubles and thus eradicate them.

    5

    All active workers who have Jewish problems at heart welcome with joy the national organization of the Jewish youth in America. They hope it will outgrow the bounds of this great country, extend a friendly hand to our brothers on the other side of the ocean and together build a universal Verband of all Jewish youth for the uniting and strengthening of their dear old people.

    Last Sunday, in New York there was a gathering of 150 delegates representing eighty organizations of American Jewish Youth. They united into one group (the Verband) organizing as a national ...

    Jewish
    III E, III B 2, III B 4, I C
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 06, 1913
    The Young Gangster in Chicago (Editorial)

    Is your son a gangster? - Just a moment, I beg you. Keep your dignity and think of where your boy spent his time during the last few weeks. Perhaps he is a gangster and you know nothing about it.

    The above mentioned words are not our own. We are not quite that pessimistic. This was quoted from a writer in one of the large English newspapers in Chicago, - a man, who for a long time, has studied the various boys' gangs in Chicago. It is, therefore, of interest and importance to hear what he has to say and then to think seriously about it.

    2

    In Chicago, there are hundreds of gangs. Their memberships run into the thousands. Most of the members are between the ages of 10 and 18 years. Those that have long been with the gang and whose careers have not been ended by the Juvenile Court have become hardened criminals, or associate with such.

    The remarkable feature in this gang situation is that most parents of these children know about them but take very little interest in the matter. These parents generally give one of two excuses: They believe it is an innocent club for boys that their son belongs to, or, on the other hand if they know the nature of the gang they have no knowledge of their boy's being a member there.

    3

    When that criminal, Webb, who murdered a policeman, was arrested, his mother and sister were surprised and frightened to death. At first they believed that surely this was some mistake. It was extremely hard for them to imagine that "their boy," their own dear child and brother is that hardened criminal that Chicago police have so long sought. There are today in Chicago hundreds of mothers, thousands of sister, who may be astounded by their sons and brothers, as the Webbs were, when their sons will be caught and their careers halted by arrest.

    The hundreds of gangs in Chicago, have their hide outs or rooms in old half broken down shanties, in the city alleys, or in dens or pits in the sparsely populated neighborhoods. The barns and pits of these gangs 4are full of the loot of their robberies. They have secret codes and keep their mouths shut. This code is strictly adhered to, since in no other place does he meet the punishment that is here dealt to the gang member who violates its secrets.

    Mr. John H. Witter, the superintendent of the Chicago Boys' Club, claims that people do not rightly understand the Chicago gangs. The public pictures the word "gangster" usually as a man who shows the lines of criminal tendencies in his face. But, as a fact, this is false. The gangster is generally a young boy of about 16 or 18 years of age in whom one can see no harm. But he is a criminal. He is a thief, a petty thief as yet.

    5

    When he reaches his 17th or 18th year he becomes more and more the criminal. The Chicago police can bear witness to the fact that there isn't a more desperate law-breaker than the young gangster. An old hand is very cautious with his tools. He avoids the crime of murder. But a youngster will unwittingly shoot a policeman the minute he sees him. He would cold bloodedly shoot a person just to have a bit of "excitement." And, because he does not show the symptoms of a true criminal, it is difficult to find him. After he has committed a murder he goes home and behaves as a normal innocent child would.

    According to Superintendent Witter the entire blame for the existence of gangsters in Chicago can be laid at the door of their environment. The city boy reaches his most trying period at the age of 10. Up to this 6time, the boy has played in his home. He has toys and playthings that occupy his young mind. But at ten his desires change. He must have new thoughts and things to amuse him such as his home does not furnish. Especially in the more crowded neighborhoods is it hard for the boy to find a more suitable preoccupation. Then he travels far from home to distant empty lots or alleys to meet other young boys like himself.

    It is in the nature of young boys when they meet to get together and do things. The spirit that accompanies this first step is very good. It is the right one to take. The club that they thus form may have a very good educational value of healthy play and amusement. But they have no one to direct and lead this club. Thus without guidance it may easily be transformed into a group of bad children.

    7

    The youngsters, so organized, now roam about seeking entertainment. If they are in the country they go to hunt squirrels. They roam the woods gathering nuts, or go swimming at the nearest creek, or even to fish. But, the city boys do not have these opportunities. Their first expedition is to an old empty house. The plumbing is removed and sold and with the money they buy, of course, candy. But you can't confine yourself only to tearing down plumbing; and besides, in the more densely settled neighborhoods, the rooms are not often empty. The boys must therefore seek other means of obtaining excitement and cash. Thus, the filching begins.

    Should one of these boys be caught early in his career and placed in the hands of the Juvenile Court, he may yet be saved. But if he should avoid arrest until he is 19, he will have become a full-fledged criminal that enters a large criminal gang operated by such persons as the Webb boy.

    8

    There are certain places in Chicago where the average local citizen is afraid to go when it is dark, because they are known as hideouts for gangsters, bandits and tough youths. Hundreds of businessmen in the districts of the tenements and the schools are being constantly robbed by these young gangsters who break into stores whether some one is there or not.

    Mr. Witter has come to the conclusion that the gangster problem is not only the task of the Chicago police but should be the problem of the entire community. The Chicago Boys' Club of which Mr. Witter is the director, has done much to rescue our youth. It is done by taking the boy off the street and giving him a place to play and to amuse himself in the clubrooms. But, the Boys' Club, inspite of the fact that it has many buildings in the various parts of the city cannot enter more than a limited number of boys. The club membership at present consists of 1,500 boys.

    9

    This is but a drop in the bucket as compared with the hordes of children that leave the straight and narrow path.

    "There is one thing I want to warn parents about," says Superintendent Witter. "That is, not to oppose the organization of children. It is the best thing for them. Some children even have to be encouraged to organize in clubs. But, parents should make it their business to know all that takes place there and should even participate, to help their boys in club work and keep them from gangster tendencies. The entire question is just a matter of play. Give the children many good play-grounds and you will find that the energies the tenement children are expending on bad features will be spent on worthy and useful purposes.

    10

    "What Chicago's parents must understand is that these small untutored gangs are the biggest schools for law-breakers, and that the youngster who graduates from these schools is the most horrible of criminals. He becomes accustomed to crimes from his earliest youth and he does his unholy work with exceptional spirit, not as crime, but as exciting sport. - What, then, were the automobile gangsters that terrorized Chicago, about a year ago? They stole, and robbed, and murdered, more for sport than for hunger or thirst."

    E. M. Wolfson.

    Is your son a gangster? - Just a moment, I beg you. Keep your dignity and think of where your boy spent his time during the last few weeks. Perhaps ...

    Jewish
    I E, II E 3, III E
  • The Sentinel -- November 14, 1913
    (No headline)

    The People's Order of Chicago, a new Jewish fraternal order, installed its officers on October 29. The organization is composed mainly of young Jewish Americans with modern and progressive ideas of fraternalism.

    The officers are: Samuel Micon, president; Saul Druker, first vice-president; Max Baum, secretary; A. Bryer, treasurer; M. Schuffman, financial secretary, and Abe Mills, guard.

    The People's Order of Chicago, a new Jewish fraternal order, installed its officers on October 29. The organization is composed mainly of young Jewish Americans with modern and progressive ideas ...

    Jewish
    III E