The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • [Association documents] -- May 11, 1876
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The chairman presented a communication which he had received from Lewis May of the committee appointed by New York congregations for the purpose of calling a convention of representatives of the various kindred institutions, to take place in the City of New York on the 24th of May, with the view of establishing a College of Hebrew learning.

    The chairman presented a communication which he had received from Lewis May of the committee appointed by New York congregations for the purpose of calling a convention of representatives of ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, I A 1 a
  • [Association documents] -- May 18, 1876
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    The subject of the proposed N. Y. convention on the 24th following, was fully discussed by the Rev. Dr. Kohler, who was present by invitation and the members present, and, it was finally unanimously resolved, that the congregation should be represented.

    The subject of the proposed N. Y. convention on the 24th following, was fully discussed by the Rev. Dr. Kohler, who was present by invitation and the members present, and, ...

    Jewish
    III B 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 14, 1878
    Israelite Visitors

    Two or three days of the present week were a Pentecostal season to the Jewish residents of the city. Leading representatives of an association called the "Union of American Hebrew Congregations" have been in the city attending a convention of its members, which was held on the 9th, 10th, and 11th inst. A banquet at the Plankinton House, addresses, and business proceedings occupied the delegates, - all of which have been faithfully reported to The Tribune. It has been an interesting sight to see the two hundred ladies and gentlemen who composed this extraordinary delegation.

    Two or three days of the present week were a Pentecostal season to the Jewish residents of the city. Leading representatives of an association called the "Union of American Hebrew ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, III C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 18, 1881
    B'nai Brith

    The annual convention of district six of the Order of B'nai Brith is in session here now. Mr. Amberg presided at yesterday's meeting.....A report was given by the committee on the erection of agricultural schools and the purchase of farms for distribution among needy Jews.....Mr. Klein proposed to supply the committee with the necessary funds so that they could carry on the work, otherwise no satisfactory results can be obtained. The committee in charge of the project will thus be able to give a more extensive report on this subject next year. Mr. Rich pledged a sum of $100 for this purpose, whereupon Mr. C. Rubowitz proposed that every member of the Order should be taxed fifty cents annually, which sum will create the necessary fund.

    This suggestion aroused violent opposition, however, because the obligations of the members are almost too heavy already. It was finally agreed that a committee of five members should be named to go ahead as best they could under the existing circumstances.....

    2

    Mr. H. C. Mitchell of Chicago submitted a minority report with regard to the admission of Russian, Lithuanian, and Polish Jews into the Order. His report recommended the admission of those Jews. Messrs. Henry Greenebaum, George Braham of Chicago, and Harry Schwimmer of Quincy, found the request of those groups of Jews to establish a new lodge of the B'nai Brith reasonable, and brought the subject up for discussion, even though the Central Executive Board rejected the request.....A lengthy debate ensued as to whether or not permission should be given for the establishment of a new lodge; Mr. C. Salomon of Chicago protested energetically against such a procedure. Nor did Mr. Engel approve, because, as he explained, the Polish and Russian Jews lack education and in addition are rather superstitious.....Mr. A. W. Rich of Milwaukee suggested as a step forward in this controversy, that evening schools should be established before the application of these Jews was granted, so that some of their ignorance could be eliminated.

    But in opposition to Mr. Rich, Charles Kozminski pleaded for the admission of the Russian, Lithuanian, and Polish Jews, emphasizing their decency and respect 3for the law. Dr. B. Felsenthal was of the same opinion, and compared the Order B'nai Brith to a locked drug store, surrounded by sick patients awaiting relief for their suffering. The organization should not deprive these people of educational opportunities by insisting on such barriers. Such restrictions would indicate a narrow-mindedness foreign to the Jewish race. Mr. Henry Greenebaum then addressed the convention describing the existing conditions. He also produced and read letters, written by the finest representatives of the Jewish people, unanimously advocating the equality of all Jews. He concluded his speech by asking: "Is it the purpose of this meeting to inspire an anti-Semitic movement in Chicago?"

    This was emphatically denied by the assembly. Mr. Rosenfels of St. Paul was, nevertheless, of the opinion that these Jews are Orthodox in their belief; they know nothing of cleanliness, and are personally repulsive. Therefore, every lodge of the Order B'nai Brith should be permitted to decide for itself whether or not to accept these Jews as members of the respective lodge.....The Chicago lodges of the Order honored the delegates to the convention by giving them a 4banquet at the Sherman House in the evening. It developed into a lively affair after the one hundred and ninety honored guests forgot their differences of opinion and joined in the merrymaking--after the strenuous hours of work at the session. Of course, the custom of speeches on such occasions was adhered to.....

    The toast to "The Race" was answered by Dr. Emil G. Hirsch. He spoke of Judaism and its two offspring, Christianity and Mohammedanism. He spoke of the persecution of the Jews and of the liberality of Belgium, which gave the Jews equal rights. Belgium's example was followed by France and also Germany. The recent anti-Semitic wave in Germany was mentioned in Dr. Hirsch's address. The gala evening ended with a ball.

    The annual convention of district six of the Order of B'nai Brith is in session here now. Mr. Amberg presided at yesterday's meeting.....A report was given by the committee on ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, III B 2, III H, I C, IV
  • Jewish Advance -- January 21, 1881
    [A Convention of the B'nai B'rith]

    The 13th annual convention of District Grand Lodge No. 6, Independent Order B'nai B'rith, was opened at 112-14 Randolph St., at 10:30 o'clock on last Sunday. The States of Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, and Minnesota, are embraced in the district.

    The circumstance was referred to that the Chicago Lodges, in addition to the charitable work imposed by the regulations of the Order, had voluntarily burdened themselves to pay a yearly subscription of $1.00 per member to the United Hebrew Relief Association, the Association which is building the Michael Reese Hospital.

    Second Day.

    The report on the charter question approved of the action of the General Committee, which was adverse to granting a charter for the organization of a lodge in this city, to be composed of Russian Jews.

    2

    The minority report was signed by H.C. Mitchell, and differed, only, in being in favor of granting a charter in the case of the applicants who brought about the dispute, and a general spirit of toleration.

    The resolution of Henry Greenebaum, introduced at a former meeting, providing for the issuing of a charter for the lodge referred to was then taken up and discussed at some length. G. Engel, of Milwaukee, was opposed to the resolution, taking the position that there were sufficient lodges already, and that if the petitioners for a charter were worthy of membership in the Order, they could join any of the existing lodges in the city. He did not believe that the objection to the petitioners was that they were Russian Jews, solely. For one, he did not know who they were, but from what he had heard they were not suitable persons to be intrusted with a charter.

    A. Kraus was opposed to the resolution. It was education that the petitioners wanted, and he did not believe that the charter asked would prove a panacea for the evils now surrounding the Russian Jews of the city.

    3

    George Braham was in favor of the resolution and said that the petitioners had everything except the endowment benefit, which they were now seeking through a charter. The opposition to them came from their own countrymen, he was sorry to say, which made it the more shameful. They were poor, uneducated, and the lower order of the race, of course, but he wanted a charter given them, and for one, would take great pleasure in visiting and instructing them.

    A.W. Rich, of Milwaukee, said he felt very much like voting on both sides of the question. He was in favor, however, of lifting up the petitioners, and the way they were doing it in his city was by establishing night schools. He did not believe in lodges as the best means of educating the down-trodden, or elevating the lowly, and he was in favor of preparing the petitioners for receiving a charter before one was granted them.

    Charles Kozminski said - He had originally discouraged the petitioners in their application for a charter, and had tried to persuade them to join existing lodges, but in vain. Since they proved so persistent, however, he 4had presented their petition, and was now heartily in favor of the granting of the charter. He was not of those who attributed the action of the Committee (in refusing the charter) though prejudice, no doubt, had much to do in solidifying the opposition to the petitioners in the District.

    Dr. Felsenthal was in favor of granting the charter asked, and of doing any and everything possible to elevate the petitioners. It would be next to impossible to distribute them as had been proposed; and he was in favor of taking hold of the unfortunates and educating them in their own jargon (Yiddish), if nothing better could be done. They could at least be elevated by contact with the better classes of Israelites, and he was in favor of it.

    Third Day.

    The Chicago members of the Order wish to place themselves on record on the question of granting a charter to the organization of Russian Jews. Twenty-three votes were cast by the Chicago men, twelve of which were for and eleven against granting the charter. The (total) vote by yeas and nays was as follows: Yeas - 22. Nays - 40.

    The 13th annual convention of District Grand Lodge No. 6, Independent Order B'nai B'rith, was opened at 112-14 Randolph St., at 10:30 o'clock on last Sunday. The States of Illinois, ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, I C, I A 2 a
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 14, 1881
    Jews Hold Council

    The Union of Jewish Communities of America held its session again yesterday forenoon at ten o'clock in Standard Hall. After attending to preliminary business the local rabbis extended an invitation to the delegates to take a coach trip and see the city. A lengthy debate ensued about the executive board's recommendation to raise half a million dollars for a Jewish college. Various delegates were of the opinion that the institution should be located in New York, and others believed it made no difference whether such a college was in New York, New Orleans, Cincinnati, or any other city, as long as it served as a university for rabbis throughout the United States. Finally the resolution was adopted to procure the money, but the problems of how to raise it, and where the institution should be located, were referred to the executive board for decision.

    In the afternoon session the chairman of the special committee read a detailed account of the persecution of Jews in Russia, whereupon a committee 2was appointed to raise money and to offer asylum in America to the banished people of Russia as well as to those who had fled. In order to facilitate emigration from Russia Mr. Abraham sought support from the many secret Jewish organizations.

    A. W. Rich considered the immigration and settlement question an important issue, which from the historical standpoint may become as significant as the exodus from Egypt. He was of the opinion that the secret organizations should help procure for every Jewish immigrant a completely equipped farm of a hundred acres, including livestock, in Nebraska or Kansas, exempt from payments of any kind for seven years, since thereby it would be possible for the settler to become a self-supporting landowner within a short time.

    The Union of Jewish Communities of America held its session again yesterday forenoon at ten o'clock in Standard Hall. After attending to preliminary business the local rabbis extended an invitation ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, II D 10, I A 2 a, III C, III G, III H, I L
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 15, 1881
    The Jewish Convention

    The Jewish convention continued its session yesterday forenoon at 9:30. Mr. Rosedal was chairman.

    Dr. Vorsanger made a motion that for every community too poor to pay a rabbi one should be supported by the Union. The motion was carried.

    Another committee, which had been instructed to consider changes in the constitution, reported that changes were unnecessary.

    A special committee which had been nominated to investigate whether the curriculum of Union College was being properly adhered to by the president and the directorate of the institution reported that there were some deviations and recommended changes; the committee also recommended the elimination of some subjects heretofore required.

    2

    Dr. Lilienthal, principal of the institution, favored the report and made a motion that the matter should be considered by a special committee. His motion was carried, and a committee, consisting of the following gentlemen, was nominated: Dr. Felsenthal, Dr. Meyer, Dr. Milzuner, Dr. Ehrlich, Dr. Hahn, Dr. Huebsch, Dr. A. Moses, Dr. A. Wise, and Dr. J. S. Goldammer.

    A lengthy debate ensued on a resolution proposed by Mr. Bloom. It was endeavored to prevent a community from obtaining the rabbi of another community unless his resignation had been accepted, or the community was willing to let him go. The measure was finally defeated.

    Dr. Wise of Cincinnati gave to the secretary the following resolution:

    "The Council authorizes the new directorate to give free scholarships financial help to all students of good character whose financial condition prevents them from attending Hebrew Union College, in order to enable talented youths to obtain an adequate education."

    3

    In the afternoon session a motion, made by Dr. Jacobs, was carried, wherein the convention thanked the American consul at Morocco for his friendly efforts in behalf of Jews in Africa. Gratitude was also expressed to the King of Spain for the hospitality shown to banished Jews from Russia.

    Dr. Gross said that he regretted conditions prevailing in Jewish communities in the United States, which in his opinion were attributable to recently immigrated rabbis who were incapable of adequately performing their duties, and so a committee was appointed to investigate the ability as well as the character of the various rabbis of American Jewish communities.

    Dr. Wise's resolution to provide money for impecunious students was defeated because of the Union's nearly empty coffers. Thereupon Dr. Wise tendered his resignation as president of the theological seminary. His request was tabled.

    The new directorate consists of the following officials: M. Loth, president, Cincinnati; A. L. Sanger, vice-president, New York; Lipman Levi, secretary, 4Cincinnati; and Solomon Levi, treasurer, Cincinnati.

    The convention adjourned sine die.

    The Jewish convention continued its session yesterday forenoon at 9:30. Mr. Rosedal was chairman. Dr. Vorsanger made a motion that for every community too poor to pay a rabbi one ...

    Jewish
    III B 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 08, 1891
    To Unite Three Jewish Societies

    At the quintennial convention of the Constitutional Grand Lodge, Independent Order of B'nai B'rith (Sons of the Covenant), held in Richmond, Virginia, last year, a committee was appointed to confer with committees which are expected to be appointed by the Kesher Shel Barzel and the Independent Order of the Free Sons of Israel - these three benevolent and fraternal societies are the three largest secret organizations in the country. The question of consolidating these and smaller orders has been agitated for the last five years.

    Definite steps are now being taken to bring representatives of the three orders together. Justice E. C. Hamburgher of Chicago, who is secretary of the B'nai B'rith District Grand Lodge No. 6, was appointed a member of the Consolidated Conference Committee. He informed a Tribune reporter yesterday that nothing would be done about this by his committee until the Kesher Shel Barzel and the Free Sons of Israel or one of those orders appointed a similar committee to confer with them.

    The "B. B's" as they are called, being the oldest, strongest, and the wealthiest of the Jewish benevolent orders, can afford to assume an independent attitude, although desirous and willing to amalgamate.

    At the quintennial convention of the Constitutional Grand Lodge, Independent Order of B'nai B'rith (Sons of the Covenant), held in Richmond, Virginia, last year, a committee was appointed to confer ...

    Jewish
    III B 4
  • Reform Advocate -- May 22, 1891
    [Reception for Doctor Wolfenstein]

    Dr. S. Wolfenstein, Superintendent of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum, passed through the city early this week, on his way home from the I.O.B.B. convention held in St. Louis. On Tuesday evening, Mr. A. Hart, President of the Asylum,tendered the Doctor a reception at the Standard Club. Mr. Hart was assisted by Directors, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kozminski and Weinschenk, and by Dr. Hirsch Julius Rosenthal, and Rabbi Calisch, of Peoria.

    All the former inmates of the Asylum who now live here, were invited to meet their old friend, and about seventy-five were present to renew their friendship and to extend their greetings. Among them were a number of mothers, with babes in their arms, and some who had not seen the Doctor for ten years or more. The evening was plesantly spent and a delight to all present.

    Dr. S. Wolfenstein, Superintendent of the Cleveland Orphan Asylum, passed through the city early this week, on his way home from the I.O.B.B. convention held in St. Louis. On Tuesday ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 g, III B 4, II D 4
  • Chicago Tribune -- February 07, 1893
    (No headline)

    After a two days' business session the Independent Order B'nai B'rith delegates, who are in Chicago enjoyed a banquet at the Great Northern last evening. Leon Schlossman presided. Judge Stein was toastmaster.

    During the business session yesterday of District Grand Lodge 6, Sec'y E. C. Hamburgher recommended that a committee be appointed to draft a memorial to Congress asking intervention in behalf of the Jews persecuted in Russia, Germany, and France. The committee was named. The secretary in his report said that the order now numbered 38,000 members in the United States and 2,500 in the Sixth District.

    The order supports five orphan asylums, ten homes for the aged and infirm, and one hospital.

    After a two days' business session the Independent Order B'nai B'rith delegates, who are in Chicago enjoyed a banquet at the Great Northern last evening. Leon Schlossman presided. Judge Stein ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, I C, III B 1