The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, I D 1 b, II A 2, II D 1, II F
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 26, 1879
    B'nai B'rith

    The brethren of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith held a mass-meeting last evening at Oriental Hall, 122 La Salle Street, to officially receive the officers and General Committee of the District Grand Lodge. The meeting was well attended, considering the state of the weather. Mr. Adolph Loeb, Grand Secretary, called the meeting to order, and, after explaining its object, nominated Mr. Charles Kozminski as Chairman, who was unanimously elected. Mr. Kozminski in a few well-chosen remarks thanked the brethren for the honor conferred upon him. A committee of three was appointed to bring in the Grand Officers. The Committee retired and soon after filed in with the officers and placed them in a row in front of the Chairman, who welcomed them. He then introduced them individually and severally to the members present. They were R. Reichman of Milwaukee, President; D. Amberg of Grand Rapids, Vice President;.....

    President R. Reichman addressed the meeting in German, going over the past history of the Order, and showing how much good has already been accomplished through its instrumentality. He also spoke of the needs to maintain the present state of the Order.

    2

    Mr. Samuel Kaizer, Professor of Elocution at Hershey Hall, then read very effectively an elaborate and able poem on religious liberty entitled "Epitoma Judaica," by Dr. H. M. Bien of this city. Dr. Bien dedicated this poem to the Orders of B'nai B'rith, Kesher Shel Barsel, and Free Sons of Israel, to commemorate the erection at Philadelphia, July 4, 1876, of Ezekiel's Centennial monument, embodying the principles of religious liberty.

    After this several of the Chicago members made short remarks and then the meeting was adjourned.

    The brethren of the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith held a mass-meeting last evening at Oriental Hall, 122 La Salle Street, to officially receive the officers and General Committee of ...

    Jewish
    III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 18, 1881
    B'nai Brith

    The annual convention of district six of the Order of B'nai Brith is in session here now. Mr. Amberg presided at yesterday's meeting.....A report was given by the committee on the erection of agricultural schools and the purchase of farms for distribution among needy Jews.....Mr. Klein proposed to supply the committee with the necessary funds so that they could carry on the work, otherwise no satisfactory results can be obtained. The committee in charge of the project will thus be able to give a more extensive report on this subject next year. Mr. Rich pledged a sum of $100 for this purpose, whereupon Mr. C. Rubowitz proposed that every member of the Order should be taxed fifty cents annually, which sum will create the necessary fund.

    This suggestion aroused violent opposition, however, because the obligations of the members are almost too heavy already. It was finally agreed that a committee of five members should be named to go ahead as best they could under the existing circumstances.....

    2

    Mr. H. C. Mitchell of Chicago submitted a minority report with regard to the admission of Russian, Lithuanian, and Polish Jews into the Order. His report recommended the admission of those Jews. Messrs. Henry Greenebaum, George Braham of Chicago, and Harry Schwimmer of Quincy, found the request of those groups of Jews to establish a new lodge of the B'nai Brith reasonable, and brought the subject up for discussion, even though the Central Executive Board rejected the request.....A lengthy debate ensued as to whether or not permission should be given for the establishment of a new lodge; Mr. C. Salomon of Chicago protested energetically against such a procedure. Nor did Mr. Engel approve, because, as he explained, the Polish and Russian Jews lack education and in addition are rather superstitious.....Mr. A. W. Rich of Milwaukee suggested as a step forward in this controversy, that evening schools should be established before the application of these Jews was granted, so that some of their ignorance could be eliminated.

    But in opposition to Mr. Rich, Charles Kozminski pleaded for the admission of the Russian, Lithuanian, and Polish Jews, emphasizing their decency and respect 3for the law. Dr. B. Felsenthal was of the same opinion, and compared the Order B'nai Brith to a locked drug store, surrounded by sick patients awaiting relief for their suffering. The organization should not deprive these people of educational opportunities by insisting on such barriers. Such restrictions would indicate a narrow-mindedness foreign to the Jewish race. Mr. Henry Greenebaum then addressed the convention describing the existing conditions. He also produced and read letters, written by the finest representatives of the Jewish people, unanimously advocating the equality of all Jews. He concluded his speech by asking: "Is it the purpose of this meeting to inspire an anti-Semitic movement in Chicago?"

    This was emphatically denied by the assembly. Mr. Rosenfels of St. Paul was, nevertheless, of the opinion that these Jews are Orthodox in their belief; they know nothing of cleanliness, and are personally repulsive. Therefore, every lodge of the Order B'nai Brith should be permitted to decide for itself whether or not to accept these Jews as members of the respective lodge.....The Chicago lodges of the Order honored the delegates to the convention by giving them a 4banquet at the Sherman House in the evening. It developed into a lively affair after the one hundred and ninety honored guests forgot their differences of opinion and joined in the merrymaking--after the strenuous hours of work at the session. Of course, the custom of speeches on such occasions was adhered to.....

    The toast to "The Race" was answered by Dr. Emil G. Hirsch. He spoke of Judaism and its two offspring, Christianity and Mohammedanism. He spoke of the persecution of the Jews and of the liberality of Belgium, which gave the Jews equal rights. Belgium's example was followed by France and also Germany. The recent anti-Semitic wave in Germany was mentioned in Dr. Hirsch's address. The gala evening ended with a ball.

    The annual convention of district six of the Order of B'nai Brith is in session here now. Mr. Amberg presided at yesterday's meeting.....A report was given by the committee on ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, III B 2, III H, I C, IV
  • The Occident -- February 22, 1889
    The Standard Club Reception.

    We are indebted to the board of managers and reception committee of the Standard Club, for an invitation to the reception tendered Thursday evening, February 21, on the occasion of the opening of their new edifice, corner Michigan Avenue, and 24th Street. The Standard is the oldest social institution of Chicago.

    We are indebted to the board of managers and reception committee of the Standard Club, for an invitation to the reception tendered Thursday evening, February 21, on the occasion of ...

    Jewish
    III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- March 06, 1891
    [Resolution Made]

    A resolution was made to open a branch of the Jewish Alliance of America in Chicago. A mass meeting was called last Sunday at Metropolitan Hall, Jefferson and O'Brien Sts.

    The following committee of organization was appointed. H. Eliassof, Dr. A. P. Kadison, Mr. Kruger, H. M. Shabad, Nathan Davis, Marks Nathan and A. Bernstein. This committee will meet tomorrow night.

    A resolution was made to open a branch of the Jewish Alliance of America in Chicago. A mass meeting was called last Sunday at Metropolitan Hall, Jefferson and O'Brien Sts. ...

    Jewish
    III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- July 13, 1891
    [Concerning the Jewish Immigrants]

    It is excusable for the German paper to make the charge that Chicago was unwilling to receive more immigrants. At that distance from us, they had no means of ascertaining the true conditions of things, nor of learning who Mr. Greenfelder and Mr. Kiss are, and what positions they occupy in our community. But what shall be said of the Rabbi from Baltimore who rushed headlong into his pulpit and edified his hearers by a furious onslaught on Chicago and myself, in particular, because we, he claims, were haters of the Jews.

    A story has been going the rounds of the Jewish press, that Hirsch of Chicago was fanatically opposed to the Russian Jews. I venture to call the whole Jewish community of Chicago to witness, whether anyone, among the Rabbi here, or elsewhere, has worked more faithfully and more tolerantly for the poor victims of Russian terror, than have I. From the first moment of their coming hither, until today, I believe I can honestly claim to have done for these people what lay in my power.

    It is excusable for the German paper to make the charge that Chicago was unwilling to receive more immigrants. At that distance from us, they had no means of ascertaining ...

    Jewish
    I C, III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- September 19, 1891
    [Russian Colonization Society]

    The Illinois Russian Colonization Society has been incorporated at Springfield, Illinois.

    Among the incorporators are Senator John M. Palmer, Rabbi Rubenstein, Chas. E. Hay and Albert Salzenstein. The intention is to purchase land in Illinois or Missouri and establish colonies of refugees.

    Rabbi Rubenstein stated "We should get nothing but reasonably good land. Experience has shown that colonies of this kind cannot be successfully established on the cheapest land. A society in Cincinnati spent $65,000 in the establishment of a colony in Kansas. That was several years ago, and the grasshoppers and drouth took the crops of the colonists, and what they did raise, they could not get a profitable market for. That colony was a failure, simply because cheap lands were utilized. Colonies established on good land have succeeded."

    2

    It is probable that the first colony will be established in Southern Illinois near the Ohio River. There the richest land can be bought for $20.00 an acre. A proposition from a landowner in that section is already in the hands of the society. A good market is within easy reach, and it is thought a colony established there would be a success.

    The Illinois Russian Colonization Society has been incorporated at Springfield, Illinois. Among the incorporators are Senator John M. Palmer, Rabbi Rubenstein, Chas. E. Hay and Albert Salzenstein. The intention is ...

    Jewish
    III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- November 07, 1891
    [Russian Relief]

    From the report of Superintendent A.R. Levy, on the relief work of the Executive Committee in Aid of the Russian Refugees.-

    "We have been able to secure employment for a good number of unskilled laborers and boys. However, our means do not suffice to meet the emergency. We are unable to find employment for all. There is but one solution to the problem - the refugees must be distributed throughout the country. The burden of this enforced and abnormal immigration is cast upon the few larger communities in the country and, our city is receiving more than its due share. It is to the country places, to the smaller cities, to the towns and villages, that we must look for the remedy. An earnest and urgent appeal must be made to our brethren in the country who will surely share with us the burden that ought to rest upon all Israelites alike. Let an appeal in the form of a letter be addressed to individual members in the smaller communities and the result will, no doubt, be very satisfactory."

    From the report of Superintendent A.R. Levy, on the relief work of the Executive Committee in Aid of the Russian Refugees.- "We have been able to secure employment for a ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II D 1, I D 2 c
  • Reform Advocate -- November 21, 1891
    [Knowledge Seekers]

    The K. A. M. "Knowledge Seekers" met last Tuesday evening and admitted a number of new members. The plan of work adopted is as follows: The Society will be divided into sections of 10 or more members, each section electing its own chairman and choosing its own subject. One of the members prepares a paper for discussion by the section. All the sections meet together once a month when various papers are read and discussed. Three sections are now organized and the subjects selected are "Jewish History and Literature", "General Literature", and "Philosophy."

    The K. A. M. "Knowledge Seekers" met last Tuesday evening and admitted a number of new members. The plan of work adopted is as follows: The Society will be divided ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, II B 1 e, III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- April 09, 1892
    [Relief Association Busy]

    The influx of Russian refugees to this city, and the severity of the weather last month, have greatly increased the work of the United Hebrew Relief Association. Superintendent Kiss, reports that during the month of March there were 493 applications made for relief by resident and transient poor. Of this number, 272 were assisted. During the same month last year, 151 applicants were assisted. The total number of persons, adults and children, assisted last month was 1,346.

    The nationalities were as follows: Russian, 233; German, 17; Hungarian, 8; Bohemian, 4; Galician, 4; English, 3; Austrian, 1; Rumanian, 1; American, 1. From the Canal Street District, there were 240 applicants, including 54 of the 66 newcomers.

    Superintendent Bartenstein, of the Labor Bureau, reported that 83 persons had applied for work. All but 11 were provided with situations.

    The influx of Russian refugees to this city, and the severity of the weather last month, have greatly increased the work of the United Hebrew Relief Association. Superintendent Kiss, reports ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, V A 1, V A 1