The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Occident -- June 18, 1885
    Meeting of the Young American Hebrew Association.

    A special meeting of the Chicago branch of the Young American Hebrew Association was held last night at 134 Pacific Avenue for the purpose of greeting Mr. David Stickles, the general agent sent out here from New York for the purpose of perfecting the Chicago organization and placing it upon a higher plane.

    The association is national, and there is a branch in every city in the United States, but for some reason this branch has not met expectation. It has, however, been organized but three months, and has done some good work in that time. Its objects are to assist the deserving, no matter what their nationality or color; unemployed men are given work or found transportation to other cities where they think they can find employment. Others are given outfits of goods to sell and so forth.

    2

    The organization here has spent about $50 in three months; found work for several and assisted many to get to other places. But the object of Mr. Stickles' visit is to suggest and devise means whereby its labors may become more effective. There is an internation association in London. Sir Moses Montefiore and Baron Rothschild being interested in it. Nothing definite was settled upon at this meeting, but steps will be at once taken toward securing a permanent location for the headquarters, which have hitherto been located at 134 Pacific Avenue.

    A special meeting of the Chicago branch of the Young American Hebrew Association was held last night at 134 Pacific Avenue for the purpose of greeting Mr. David Stickles, the ...

    Jewish
    III E, II D 8
  • United Hebrew Charities -- December 26, 1890
    (U. H. C. Correspondence)

    Quotations from a letter sent to B. H. Hartogensis, Esq. Editor "Jewish Exponent", Baltimore, Md., by B. J. Werthsimer, Secretary in regard to the good work being done by the Labor Bureau of the U. H. C. -

    "I send you by today's mail reports for 88-89 and 89-90 in which I have marked matter referring to the Labor Bureau. Of course I am unable to state how many of the beneficiaries would have found employment without our aid but if you will note that 90% of the applicants last year were foreigners, it is but reasonable to conclude that few, if any, could have procured work without its assistance. And I may add that almost all of those for whom employment was secured would have become charges upon our relief society had no work been supplied them.

    The Superintendent of the bureau, Mr. Bartenstein, devotes all of his time to that work and receives a salary of $1800 a year. His office is connected with that of the Relief office so that the Supt. of Relief may turn over to him at once the applicants for whom the Bureau should care. In general we have found the Labor Bureau of great value in charitable work in uncovering frauds on 2the one hand and on the other in enabling many worthy persons to become self-sustaining. I earnestly hope that your efforts in establishing such a bureau in Baltimore may meet with success."

    Quotations from a letter sent to B. H. Hartogensis, Esq. Editor "Jewish Exponent", Baltimore, Md., by B. J. Werthsimer, Secretary in regard to the good work being done by the ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, I D 2 c
  • Reform Advocate -- March 06, 1891
    Local News

    Election of officers of the Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association last Monday night. It was announced by the secretary, that the total membership was 449, an increase of 44 during the year. The Labor Bureau had found employment for 443 cut of 494 applicants. Superintendent Barensteen found places for twenty boys to learn trades and only nine took advantage of the opportunity.

    Election of officers of the Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association last Monday night. It was announced by the secretary, that the total membership was 449, an increase of 44 during ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8
  • Reform Advocate -- April 24, 1891
    [Growth of Jewish Charities]

    The Jewish charities of our city have undoubtedly during the past decade grown in a most gratifying manner. Our population has increased, our means for doing good have become larger, and the number of our charitable institutions has more than doubled in the last ten years. In 1880, we had the Hebrew Relief Society, with its auxiliaries, the sewing societies and the Jochanna Lodge and Deborah Verein. The treasury of the main society was then, as it is still now, never overflowing with surplus funds. The Jewish hospital had fallen a prey to our great fire.

    The prospects in 1880 for rebuilding and re-organizing the Hospital were flattering; late in the fall of that year the corner stone was laid. We had then, as now, our Orphan asylum in Cleveland, and institution which deserves to be classed among our own local charities, as it takes care of our orphans.

    2

    The Congregations were by no means large or well supported. With the exception of the Sinai Congregation, none had a house of worship of any pretentions whatever. The Sinai Congregation with its seventy members staggered under a heavy indebtedness.

    Things have changed during these ten years. The United Hebrew Charities, the successor of the Old Relief, is better supported, although in consideration of the needs, the sums collected are by no means as large as the work requires. The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Society, organized in '83, and now one of the most active channels through which collections for charitable purposes are made, supports in connection with the Charities, a labor bureau. The Hospital was dedicated in 1891, and during the ten years since elapsed, has worked itself into the admiring affection of Jew and non-Jew alike in our city. Today there is a unanimity of opinion that the Michael Reese Hospital is a model of its kind. The building has been repeatedly altered and enlarged. A children's ward was opened two years ago, and a school for nurse's training was added 3recently to the other departments. The operating room is perhaps the finest in the whole West, and its outfit the most complete.

    Who dreamed ten years ago of a Manual Training School? People had heard of a workingmen's school in New York, but even in their fondest anticipations would have refused to credit that it would be out-stripped sometime by a school founded by the Jews of Chicago, and for the Jews of Chicago, both in the point of number and the scope of its cirriculum.

    Under the able supervision of Prof. Bamberger and his corps of competent and devoted assistants, the school has grown to its present size of nine hundred pupils in day school, and large evening classes (supported by the B. B. Lodges and the Johanna Lodge) for the instruction of men and women.

    Now, scarcely half a year after the opening of the training school, we also have our Old People's Home. The generosity of outsiders has incited to action the benevolence of our own citizens, and we now find the original 4gift more than duplicated.

    Besides these donations and endowments for new charities, the orphan asylum has made its annual collection, and has received more than thirty thousand dollars as a contribution from Chicago for the erection of a new building.

    But there is one feature lacking in our charities, and it should be filled speedily. We have provided for the poor, for the sick, for the able-bodied in the search of work; we have made provisions for the orphans, not merely in Cleveland, but also in a smaller way, through the Frank fund, gift of Mrs. E. Frank. We look after the educational wants of our Russian newcomers; we soon will be able to care for our old people. What is wanting? We have made no provision for such as are temporarily embarrassed, who for the loan of a few hundreds of dollars might succeed in gaining, once and for all, an honorable independence.

    5

    These are not to be confounded with the ordinary applicants for aid in our relief offices. Here is a field of new benevolence. It is not a charity in the ordinary sense of the word. Nor need it be unprofitable. A society to make loans of this kind is a necessity in our Jewish community, and would repay on the investment a yearly return from two to three percent. The loans are collected in small instalments, but with unfailing regularity, and without concessions. The interest is paid willingly by the recipients of the loans, for that relieves them of all imputation of having received charity. The experiment has been tried in London and has proved successful. That we should attempt something similar in our community, none is more competent to testify than those who almost daily are asked to give help in the direction outlined.

    We hope that a loan society will be organized on the basis proposed. None would lose, but many would gain by this new institution, which, while truly benevolent, would not be charitable in the common meaning of the term.

    The Jewish charities of our city have undoubtedly during the past decade grown in a most gratifying manner. Our population has increased, our means for doing good have become larger, ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3, I A 3, II D 8
  • Reform Advocate -- October 03, 1891
    [Report on Aid to Russian Refugees]

    From the report of Dr. A. R. Levy, as superintendent of the new organization to aid the Russian refugees that come to Chicago.

    "Our work in its various phases has the attention of several organizations, which work hand in hand for a common good. The Sheltering Home, "Hachnosas Orchem", has sheltered to the 15th of this month 652 people, having given to some, shelter and food for 12 days,while others stayed at the Home but one or two days. The West Side Young Ladies' Aid Society, an organization of twenty young ladies, is looking after the management of the Home. A committee of physicians, with Dr. Meyerowitz as the daily attending medical, looks after the sanitary condition of the House and the health of the inmates.

    "The Zion Personal Service Society has enlisted in the work and has a committee daily at our office to assist the Advisory Board. This Society is handling such cases as require their help. The B.B. lodges, represented by the president of the District Grand Lodge, are also in our work.

    2

    "The varied work carried on by the Executive Committee can only be briefly alluded to in this report. The finding of employment for the skilled laborers and the placing of the unskilled ones, the providing for orphan children, the placing of widows in a position to support themselves and those dependent on them, and the furthering of the best insterests of the refugees by distributing the families outside of the Canal St. district - all these are matters requiring no small effort."

    From the report of Dr. A. R. Levy, as superintendent of the new organization to aid the Russian refugees that come to Chicago. "Our work in its various phases has ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, II A 1
  • Reform Advocate -- October 03, 1891
    (No headline)

    From Dr. A. R. Levy's report as superintendent of the new organization to aid the Russian refugees that come to this city.

    "During the first half of the present month, our board listened to 58 applications, 38 of these were families with children comprising in all 187 souls. The balance of 20 applications were either of families without children or individuals making an aggregate of 212 persons; 23 families were assisted with one month's rent for their respective homes and some provided with furniture. Work has been found for nearly all of the heads of families."

    Each day of the week, two or three members of the Advisory Board are at the office, 493 S. Jefferson Street, from 9 - 12 o'clock to listen to the applications taken by the superintendent. The Zion Personal Service Society is represented daily by two ladies. The Advisory Board meets every Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock and the Executive Committee the same night at 8 o'clock. The Sheltering Society meets once a week and is presided over by Mr. J. Lewis.

    From Dr. A. R. Levy's report as superintendent of the new organization to aid the Russian refugees that come to this city. "During the first half of the present month, ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 21, 1891
    Banishment of Jews from Russia. about 7000 Jews Have Found Refuge in Chicago During the Past Year

    Since the first of August about 1,500 Russian Jews have been seeking and have found refuge in Chicago. They were banished from their homes and property in Russia, and had to escape the wrath of the Czar.

    Without means, unable to speak English, unfamiliar with our customs and habits, they came to the shores of Lake Michigan, trusting fully in the famous and proverbial charity, the readiness to help of those of their race and faith, who were able to do so.

    2

    Astonishingly large is the number of these unfortunate, banished Jews!

    The Russian tyrant considered them the worst criminals, because they dared to be loyal and devoted to the faith of their fathers. During the period from August 1, 1890 until August 1, 1891 about 54,000 banished and exiled Jews landed in New York, and until December 1, approximately 11,000 additional arrived. About 7,000 of these came to Chicago.

    3

    In the beginning, as thousands of the unfortunate Jews arrived, the native co-religionists were completely unprepared to render the necessary aid. To cope with such mass-misery, to protect them from hunger and disease, and to provide jobs for them, could be done only by organized charity.....

    Nowhere did the unfortunate Jews receive better care than in Chicago, although they were completely dependent upon the charity, aid, and assistance of their fellow-believers.

    The huge task of taking care of the refugees is carried on in Chicago by the Executive Committee Aiding Russian Refugees. This committee remains in continual contact with similar committees in neighboring states, and if some of the exiled have friends or relatives in any of these they are usually sent there. An Advisory Board assists the Executive Committee, and it is located in the heart of the Russian-Jewish section.

    4

    It holds conferences in which the applications for relief are considered and disposed of five days a week.

    Members of the Executive Committee: Adolph Loeb, president; J. Rosenberg and H. Greenebaum, vice-presidents; O. G. Foreman, treasurer; Rev. A. Norden, secretary; Dr. A. R. Levy, superintendent; H. Eliassof, manager; Dr. B. Felsenthal, Dr. E. G. Hirsch, Dr. J. S. Moses, J. Rosenthal, H. A. Kohn, N. Morris, Ab. Hart, J. Beifield, A. Kuh, A. Kraus, S. Nathan, and A. Gatzert, members of the Advisory Board; L. Schlossman, chairman; Dr. B. Felsenthal, Dr. J. Stoltz, A. J. Frank, I. Cowen, J. Lewis, J. Berkson, D. Goldstein, A. Weil, A. Bondy, L. Zolotkoff, A. Bernstein.

    5

    To collect contributions and subscriptions the Executive Committee appointed sub-committees......which were organized only a few months ago. These have succeeded so well that they have been collecting lately on the average of $1,000 per week, and this money came from the middle and poorer classes, and not from the rich.

    If Jewish exiles come to Chicago, they are sheltered in the temporary asylum at 152 West 12th Street for twelve days. Since the first of September, 15,652 persons found refuge there. This home is managed by the Westside Ladies Aid Society. The Zion Congregation of Rabbi Dr. Stolz, and the Chicago Lodges of the B'nai B'rith assisted greatly in this work.

    6

    The Executive Committee tries to find work for these immigrants as soon as possible. During the month of September, 311 persons, among these only 39 skilled workers, found employment through the committee, and during October and November about 200 workers were placed each month. It is difficult to find work for skilled labor, but much more so for unskilled and common labor. But since there is hardly one Israelite in Chicago, who does not gladly and eagerly lend a helping hand to these unfortunate ones, all difficulties are readily overcome. This is indeed an eloquent testimony of the sacrificial liberality of the Jews in Chicago!

    Since the first of August about 1,500 Russian Jews have been seeking and have found refuge in Chicago. They were banished from their homes and property in Russia, and had ...

    Jewish
    III G, II D 1, II D 8, IV
  • Reform Advocate -- March 04, 1893
    From Mr. H. Eliassof's Report as Superintendent of the Society in Aid of Russian Refugees

    The Society was organized on August 23rd, 1891, and the work of relieving the refugees commenced the following month. On Jan. 31st, 1893, it completed 17 months of work. During the first 6 months, 391 applications were considered with $5,616 disbursed. In the following 11 months, 671 applications were taken and $25,038 expended, making a grand total of $1,062 applications and $30,654 cash disbursed for 17 months.

    In the beginning of March, 1892, the Society was reorganized and arrangements were then completed to receive, care for, and distribute a greater number of refugees than before. Energetic efforts were made to enable the Society to send away from Chicago to the country towns as many refugees as could be induced to leave the large and crowded city. The work of distribution was done systematically. The refugees were not forced upon the 2communities, but were shipped to places only, where our traveling agent found parties who were willing to accept the new-comers and help them find homes and work. All families or single men, who were sent from Chicago to the country, were assigned with credentials to one man or to a committee, in the respective town, who took charge of them. The 1,062 applications during the 17 months represent a total number of 2,968 persons, the number of families being 603. Among the total number of applications were 387 mechanics, with 75 trades represented, 26 professionals, and 44 farmers.

    915 persons were sent away from Chicago, of which 129 returned. Some of these came back because they preferred not to stay in small towns where they could not live Kosher, according to the dietary laws of the Mosaic Code. The Employment Bureau was in operation from March 23rd to Sept. 17, 1892 and during this time found work for 505 applicants.

    3

    Taking into consideration the large number of people in the care of the Society, very few deaths occurred during these 17 months.

    The results of the work can be considered very satisfactory. From reliable bits of information received by the Society, it may be safely concluded that the majority of those refugees who were sent to the country communities are well taken care of and are in a better position than those who remained in the city. Most of them have found employment and are becoming self sustaining. Some of the married men who had left their families in Russia were able, after working 6 or 8 months, to send enough money to bring their relatives here.

    The Society was organized on August 23rd, 1891, and the work of relieving the refugees commenced the following month. On Jan. 31st, 1893, it completed 17 months of work. During ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, V A 2, II D 1, V A 2
  • Reform Advocate -- October 07, 1893
    (No headline)

    The thirty-fourth annual meeting of the United Hebrew Charities of Chicago, was held last Tuesday night in the vestry room of the Sinai Temple. The annual reports were read.

    Mr. Kiss, Superintendent of the Relief Bureau, reported that during the year ending with Sept. 1893, 2,949 resident cases were assisted against 2,284 cases the previous year. During the same time, 185 transients were assisted. The total number of assisted cases was 3,134, comprising 5,100 adults and 8,200 children, or 13,300 persons in all, an increase of 31 per cent.

    President Bartenstein of the Employment Bureau, reported that 870 out of 966 applicants were given employment. Many of these have become self-supporting. Of the applicants, 676 came from Russia.

    The Hospital Committee reported that 1,072 patients were treated during the year. 23 mothers were skilfully cared for in the maternity ward.

    2

    There were 70 applicants for admission to the Training School for Nurses, and 23 are now in school.

    In the Pharmaceutical Department, 7,658 prescriptions were filled for the Hospital, and 5,687 for poor patients outside of the Hospital.

    Mr. B. I. David, Superintendent of the Hospital, reported that of the 1,072 patients treated, 99 were Jewish pay-patients, 600,Jewish charity-patients, 257, non-Jewish pay-patients, and 116, non-Jewish charity-patients. The income from the pay-patients was $13,932.50.

    The South Side Ladies Sewing Society disbursed $4,021.34, over 300 families being assisted. The West Side Ladies Sewing Society clothed 205 families, consisting of 900 persons, at an expense of over $2,200. The North Side Society expended over $2,600 in giving relief to 285 families.

    The Relief Department received during the year over $26,500, and expended nearly $28,500, the exact deficit being $1,678.65.

    The thirty-fourth annual meeting of the United Hebrew Charities of Chicago, was held last Tuesday night in the vestry room of the Sinai Temple. The annual reports were read. Mr. ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3, II D 8
  • Reform Advocate -- December 28, 1895
    [A Creche for Jewish Children]

    A workroom, where girls and women may be given employment during the winter, will soon be established at W. 12th and S. Halsted streets by fifteen Jewish charity societies. A public nursery is now conducted at the same locality, and the workroom will be operated in connection with it, thus providing a haven for children while their mothers are engaged in their work. The workroom is non-sectarian and is designed to give employment to unskilled labor.

    A workroom, where girls and women may be given employment during the winter, will soon be established at W. 12th and S. Halsted streets by fifteen Jewish charity societies. A ...

    Jewish
    II D 8