The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Jewish Advance -- November 22, 1878
    (No headline)

    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. Y. M. H. A.

    About two years ago, a very warm and enthusiastic agitation for literary societies commenced to stir up the young men of the North Side, and they at once organized a society under the name of Y. M. H. A. The success and prosperity which they enjoyed in the first days of their existence, prompted some young people of the West Side to do likewise, and the Zion Lit. "became an established fact," and a short time afterward the Sinai and Progress, on the South Side, were organized, and they were followed by the members of the Standard Club, who instituted at their establishment the "alma mater of fashion, an extraordinary chair of literature and debate, and called the same "Literary Society."

    For about a year these Literaries were all the rage with the young folks, they became absorbing topics of the day, but, alas, this did not last very 2long. The warm feelings for elevation and cultivation of the mind relaxed, subsided, and at last passed away like a cloud. The Y. M. H. A. was the first to give up its ghost, and on last Wednesday the Sinai Lit. followed them into the quiet waters of the Lethe.

    At present we have here only three Literary Societies, the Zion on the West and the Standard and Progress on the South Side, and according to my judgement, the Zion alone stands today developed as an organization in full strength of a promising and useful existence.

    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. Y. M. H. A. About two years ago, a very warm and enthusiastic agitation for literary societies commenced to stir up the young men of ...

    Jewish
    II B 1 d, II D 6
  • Reform Advocate -- July 02, 1892
    (No headline)

    What is known as the "Poor Jews Quarter" is near the western end of the Twelfth Street Bridge, and southward to the West Side Italian quarters. Certainly it is not an abode of ease, luxury, and elegance. Its architecture is not marked by either massiveness or ornamentation, its streets and alleys are not grassy. On the other hand, the region is still less suggestive of a "Ghetto," according to any prevailing tradition of these abodes. Many of these children have never seen a tree or a blade of grass. "In our summer country excursions," said a lady of the Hull House, "we have much pleasure in watching them. They kneel down sometimes so as to study the grass and feel it with their hands."

    In the midst of this swarming colony, rises the tall, large, handsome, and solid "Jewish Training School," under the management of a strong band of staunch Israelites of the city and the superintendency of Professor Gabriel Bamberger. Twenty-thousand dollars a year is wisely and economically expended here, and eight-hundred children, of both sexes, and all races and religions, are taught and cared for. The classes in drawing and clay-modeling are especially notable.

    2

    Not far away is the "Shelter House" of the "Society in Aid of Russian Refugees." There, the members of this unfortunate class find surcease from their woes and persecutions in a blessed harbor of temporary refuge, from where they are transferred to various employments and chances to earn an honest living, free from imperialism, officialism, priestcraft, and military service. They are a sturdy looking set, and will not be long in learning that their greatest ill-treatment is turned to their greatest good luck when they arrive at the "Shelter House." They are coming at the rate of more than ten a day. They are "submerged" no longer. - Joseph Kirkland, in June Scribner's.

    What is known as the "Poor Jews Quarter" is near the western end of the Twelfth Street Bridge, and southward to the West Side Italian quarters. Certainly it is not ...

    Jewish
    III A, II B 2 f, II D 6
  • Reform Advocate -- July 30, 1892
    (No headline)

    Some time ago the Society in Aid of the Russian Refugees bought the four-story and basement brick building on the northwest corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, for the purpose of having it fitted up as a Sheltering House for the Russian Refugees. Repairs have been made on this building, and the Society has taken possession of its new home.

    The Sheltering House is a handsome and substantial building containing 36 rooms, besides the basement and the attic. In the basement are located the bath rooms, laundry, drying and baggage storage rooms. On the first floor are the general offices of the Society, the Employment Bureau, and the clothing rooms. The second floor contains the sitting and reading rooms, dining room and kitchen, and the custodian's private rooms. The third floor comprises the sleeping rooms for women and children, and the fourth floor, those for the men. In this house the refugees are lodged and fed for three days.

    2

    The Society has been in existence since September, 1891. It has and is still accomplishing an incalculable amount of good.

    Chicago is a distributing center and a great number of the unfortunate refugees come here from all the port cities of the land. The great bulk of them, however, come from New York.

    The Society distributes the refugees over the great West. It employs a traveling agent, who visits the different communities in the Western states, enlisting the sympathy and cooperation of the Jewish citizens, to find homes and employment for the refugees. The Society has the satisfaction of knowing that it has saved hundreds of these unfortunate exiles from starvation and that it has helped many a family to become self-sustaining.

    3

    The old Sheltering House Association, which existed among our Russo-Polish co-religionists, before the Society in Aid of Russian Refugees was established, is still lending a helping hand.

    The South and West Side Ladies Sewing Societies have liberally contributed towards the furnishing of the Sheltering Home in linens, comforters, etc.

    The Sheltering House is now an established institution. It is well worthy of a place of honor among the charitable institutions of our community, and fully deserving of the liberal and generous support of all friends of the poor and oppressed.

    Some time ago the Society in Aid of the Russian Refugees bought the four-story and basement brick building on the northwest corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, for the purpose ...

    Jewish
    II D 6, II D 1, III B 2
  • Reform Advocate -- July 20, 1901
    (No headline)

    One of the purposes of the Home for Jewish Friendless and Working Girls, which will open in September, is to give girls, employed in stores and offices at low salaries, the opportunity and advantages of home life at a nominal cost. Motherly women will look after their welfare.

    One of the purposes of the Home for Jewish Friendless and Working Girls, which will open in September, is to give girls, employed in stores and offices at low salaries, ...

    Jewish
    II D 6
  • The Reform Advocate -- October 05, 1901
    (No headline)

    On Oct. 6, the doors of the Home for the Jewish Friendless and Working Girls will be formally thrown open. The public will be enabled to inspect the inner workings of this long needed institution. It is located at Nos. 1, 2, and 3 Ogden Front, at the intersection of Clark and Wells Streets, and has a capacity for about 100.

    The special purposes of this institution are primarily to help poor people to help themselves, thus avoiding pauperism. Children whose parents are sick or out of work, will be taken in and sheltered until the parents have been restored to health or have secured employment. Destitute women will be given shelter until they are able to secure work. Convalescents, who have been discharge from hospitals, will be cared for until able to care for themselves. Aged women will be received while arranging for permanent homes. Abandoned children of parents unable to or unfit to support them will be cared for.

    An interesting feature of the organization of this institution lies in the fact that no contributions have been nor will be solicited. The idea originated with the members of the Baron Hirsch Ladies' Aid Society, who have, by their tireless efforts, succeeded in completely furnishing the home in such fashion as to do credit 2to the city of Chicago.

    The officers have been selected and are Mrs. B. Mandel, president, Mrs. Hugo Brady, first vice-president, Mrs. A. Loebman, recording secretary and Mrs Henry Roth, treasurer.

    On Oct. 6, the doors of the Home for the Jewish Friendless and Working Girls will be formally thrown open. The public will be enabled to inspect the inner workings ...

    Jewish
    II D 6
  • Reform Advocate -- May 28, 1904
    (No headline)

    The spirit of self-betterment has entered into the ranks of the West Side Jews. A number of young men gathered together. Each subscribed a little sum as the foundation for a fund and a charter was secured, and thus the Chicago Hebrew Institute was organized.

    The objects of the Institute, as stated in the charter, are the promotion of education, moral, and physical culture, and civic training, and the social advancement of the Jewish residents of the city of Chicago. For those purposes the institution will maintain and conduct schools, libraries, laboratories, reading, class and club rooms, gymnasium, music and lecture halls, and acquire such lands and erect such buildings as may be required for the accomplishment of its purposes.

    A large sum of money is necessary for the erection of this institute, which is to be raised by popular subscription. Shares, at one dollar each, are being sold, thus enabling every man, woman, and child to actively participate in the realization of this undertaking.

    2

    The prospectus outlines a vast field of intended activities. In the department of English and Literature, there will be courses in elementary English for foreigners, and in English and American History. The curriculum provides for a department of commerce, of domestic art and science, of fine arts and music, a kindergarten with English classes for immigrant children, and a department of Hebrew language which will include classes in the Bible, Jewish History, conversation in Hebrew and Hebrew penmanship. There will be a department of moral work, with provision for a children's Sabbath School and a people's synagogue. By arrangement with several universities a course of lectures will be given each season. Concerts and entertainments will be arranged for children and adults. A Hebrew, German, French, and English library will be maintained.

    The spirit of self-betterment has entered into the ranks of the West Side Jews. A number of young men gathered together. Each subscribed a little sum as the foundation for ...

    Jewish
    II D 6
  • Reform Advocate -- June 18, 1904
    (No headline)

    For the purpose of philanthropic work, 15 girls have organized a society known as the Deborah Juniors, an auxiliary of the prominent Deborah Verein. Since their preliminary meeting on April 12, their membership has grown to 120. Miss Daisy Ritterband is the president. The present aim of the Deborah Juniors is the equipment of the gymnasium of the new Jewish Home for the Friendless, which is being erected at 53rd St. and Ellis Ave.

    For the purpose of philanthropic work, 15 girls have organized a society known as the Deborah Juniors, an auxiliary of the prominent Deborah Verein. Since their preliminary meeting on April ...

    Jewish
    II D 10, II D 6
  • Reform Advocate -- December 24, 1904
    (No headline)

    The Home for the Jewish Friendless and Working Girls was dedicated last Sunday. Rabbi Hirschberg apoke in behalf of the Jewish community and paid tribute to the memory of Bernard Kuppenheimer in whose honor the new building had been erected by his sons. Judge Mack spoke on the Home in its relation to the work of the Juvenile Court.

    The Home for the Jewish Friendless and Working Girls was dedicated last Sunday. Rabbi Hirschberg apoke in behalf of the Jewish community and paid tribute to the memory of Bernard ...

    Jewish
    II D 6, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 20, 1906
    Cornerstone for the Northwest Side Talmud Torah

    Next Sunday afternoon the cornerstone for the new Northwest Side Talmud Torah will be laid at 1517 Morris Place near Davison Street. Chicago Jews have long known of the need for a Talmud Torah on the Northwest Side, and our friends in that neighborhood deserve the support and respect of the Jews of the entire city for making possible the building of this structure.

    Many notables are expected to be present at the ceremonies when the cornerstone will be laid. It is planned that the school will also serve some of the functions of a community center.

    Next Sunday afternoon the cornerstone for the new Northwest Side Talmud Torah will be laid at 1517 Morris Place near Davison Street. Chicago Jews have long known of the need ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, II D 6, III C
  • Reform Advocate -- April 21, 1906
    (No headline)

    At a meeting of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, the offer of the B'nai B'rith to take over the project to raise funds for a Jewish settlement center on the West Side, was unanimously accepted. The institute's members have united to raise $250,000 for the building.

    At a meeting of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, the offer of the B'nai B'rith to take over the project to raise funds for a Jewish settlement center on the West ...

    Jewish
    II D 6