The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Jewish Advance -- August 02, 1878
    (No headline)

    There are now 114 patients in the Mount Sinai Hospital. During the month of June there were admitted 120; discharged 119, and died, 9. Of the discharged 90 were cured, 27 improved, and 9 unimproved.

    There are now 114 patients in the Mount Sinai Hospital. During the month of June there were admitted 120; discharged 119, and died, 9. Of the discharged 90 were cured, ...

    Jewish
    II D 3
  • Jewish Advance -- August 23, 1878
    Michael Reese

    Chicago is going to have a Jewish Hospital. The heirs of Michael Reese will contribute a share of their inheritance toward this purpose.

    Chicago is going to have a Jewish Hospital. The heirs of Michael Reese will contribute a share of their inheritance toward this purpose.

    Jewish
    II D 3
  • Jewish Advance -- May 02, 1879
    (No headline)

    The erection of a hospital in this city is now seriously discussed by the heirs of the Reese estate. There are two legacies, one of $50,000, and the other of $200,000, set apart by the will of Michael Reese for various charities. From both of these legacies the Chicago charities are to have their shares. It is estimated that about $75,000 will be the portion alloted to the erection and maintenance of a Jewish hospital in this city. The Reese heirs and the "hospital committee" of the United Hebrew Relief Association, are busily at work deliberating and arguing on the subject. The U. H. R. A. owns a lot on N. La Salle St. for the erection of a hospital. It is proposed by some, that this lot should be sold, and another one be purchased outside of the city limits, where a larger ground can be had for laying out a garden and promenade for the invalids.

    The erection of a hospital in this city is now seriously discussed by the heirs of the Reese estate. There are two legacies, one of $50,000, and the other of ...

    Jewish
    II D 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 03, 1879
    Jewish Hospital

    The Chicago fire destroyed the Jewish Hospital. Enough money is now available to reconstruct the institution. The proposed site is on North La Salle Street.

    The Jewish millionaire, Michael Reese, of California, gave directions, in his will, that his Chicago heirs spend a portion of their inheritance from his estate for benevolent purposes in Chicago. In accordance with these instructions, Heinrich Frank of this city gave thirty thousand dollars (a part of the inheritance) toward the building fund of the Hospital; and Mrs. Henriette Rosenfeld and Jacob Rosenberg gave fifty thousand dollars to provide an amortization fund.

    These sums have been given to the local United Hebrew Relief Association, and there is about $12,000 in the treasury of the Association which is also available for the Hospital.

    The only condition which was specified in the testament of Reese, was that the proposed institution should be called the "Reese Hospital."

    The Chicago fire destroyed the Jewish Hospital. Enough money is now available to reconstruct the institution. The proposed site is on North La Salle Street. The Jewish millionaire, Michael Reese, ...

    Jewish
    II D 3
  • Jewish Advance -- June 06, 1879
    (No headline)

    As we have informed our readers some time ago, we will soon have a new Jewish hospital in this city. The sums which have been appropiated for that purpose by the Reese heirs of this city are $50,000, by Mrs. Henrietta Rosenfeld and Mr. Jacob Rosenberg, and $30,000 by Messrs. Joseph and Henry Frank.

    The hospital fund of the U. H. R. A. amounts, besides this, to $12,000 and a plot of ground on N. La Salle St. Thus the sum of $192,000 is on hand for this, so greatly needed, benevolent institution.

    As we have informed our readers some time ago, we will soon have a new Jewish hospital in this city. The sums which have been appropiated for that purpose by ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, IV
  • Jewish Advance -- February 27, 1880
    (No headline)

    The work on the building of the Reese Hospital will probably begin in the Spring. The U. H. R. Association has purchased for the purpose the lot between Lake Ave. Cottage Place and 29th st., with an area of 208 by 54 feet.

    The work on the building of the Reese Hospital will probably begin in the Spring. The U. H. R. Association has purchased for the purpose the lot between Lake Ave. ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- October 01, 1880
    (No headline)

    The Reese Hospital.

    On last Tuesday (Sept. 28) ground was broken and work commenced on the Reese Hospital, which will be located on the corner of 29th St. and Cottage Pl. The establishment will consist of an executive building in the center, and wings on each flank. It will be built of red pressed brick (upon a stone base constituting the cellar) with stone trimmings and a slate roof. The heating and ventilation of the entire building will be, according to the opinion of experts and physicians, the most perfect of the kind.

    The executive building will be three stories above the basement. The basement will contain a large dining room, a kitchen and pantries. On the first floor will be the main entrance, directors' and physicians' offices. Behind the offices will be a hall, running through the whole width of the building, with three private wards, and toilet rooms opening into it. On the second floor will be situated four private wards, bathrooms, operating room, medicated bath, inhaling room and library. On the third floor will be six private wards and bathrooms.

    2

    The wings will contain the general wards,for female patients in the right, and for male patients in the left wing. Each of the wings will be two stories high, with a ward on each floor; fourteen beds will be placed in each ward. There will also be situated on each floor, three private wards, a nurses' room, a toilet room, and a closet with ready access from the ward. The two flights of stairs in the building will be cut off from the halls with glass partitions, thus keeping the halls in the same temperature with the rooms. On each of the wings, facing the east, between the stairs and the corner-tower, will be a spacious veranda, commanding a full view of the lake.

    In the basement of the male department, the heater's, the engineer's and domestic rooms, and water closets, will be situated. In the basement of the female department there will be the physicians' room, waiting room, drug store, laboratory, three "strong wards" for unruly patients, store-rooms, water closets, etc. A cellar will run the entire building.

    Forty feet back of the executive department will be situated the laundry and the morgue.

    The Reese Hospital. On last Tuesday (Sept. 28) ground was broken and work commenced on the Reese Hospital, which will be located on the corner of 29th St. and Cottage ...

    Jewish
    II D 3
  • Jewish Advance -- November 05, 1880
    (No headline)

    The Corner Stone.

    (Speech by) Mr. M. M. Gerstley, in behalf of the Board of the U. H. R. A.

    The first Hebrew Relief Society in this city was called into existence in a strange and most peculiar manner. It was in 1854. The number of our coreligionists in this city at that time was about 3,000. Everybody endeavored to improve his condition as best he might but it was natural that in this struggle for success, some would fail and be forced to yield to the inevitable. It was then whispered that some worthy family amongst us was in need, even in the want of the necessities of life, but they could not be approached in any way to accept assistance. They would rather hide their misery. It was soon concluded what to do. Certain parties went to a neighboring grocery, bought flour, and provisions, directed them to the party mentioned, with the injunction not to tell who sent them. But the party finding it was to be accepted as a donation, or as charity, refused 2to receive them and had them returned. It was then contemplated that in order to spare the delicacy of feeling of parties in need, by being approached through the assistance of individuals, the object might be better accomplished through the formation of a charitable society.

    A society, "the first Hebrew Relief Society" of this city, with scarcely a score of members at the outset was then formed. It was soon ascertained, however, that the scanty means of the society were absorbed by applicants, especially by new-comers, consequently one or more societies for the same designs were formed. While these various institutions endeavored to do all the good, which was to be done within their limited spheres of action, there seemed still to exist a certain incongruity, a want of concerted action, between these societies; for it was clearly demonstrated that while under such a disorganized system, all the necessary care and attention were bestowed upon some parties, others equally as worthy were almost, it not entirely, neglected.

    3

    There was to be a remedy. Several meetings were held, and in order to bring about better results the various component societies, about ten in number, formed themselves into one general institution under the name and style of the United Hebrew Relief Association, in 1858.

    There seemed to be at that time but one, probably two hospitals in this city, that of the Sisters of Mercy, and the St. Luke's Hospital. When the constitution of the U. H. R. Association was formed, two members, engrafted in it a provision, to wit: "It is the ultimate design of this association to build a hospital."

    Time passed. The U. H. R. A. infused new life, and produced a greater concert of action amongst the whole community. Notwithstanding the generous contribution and continuous good will shown by our community for the well being of the association, still the people were not satisfied. They asked, 4they clamored for the erection of the long promised hospital. And finally, in 1865, the spirit of our community was aroused, and at a public mass-meeting held at the old Concordia Club Hall, in the then known Lombard Block, sufficient means were subscribed to enable the executive board to buy a lot and build a hospital on N. La Salle St., near Schiller, at an expense of $23,000. At the laying of the cornerstone, in 1866, the late Hon. J. B. Rice, then mayor of the city, proclaimed to the public that though this hospital was to be built and maintained exclusively by the Jewish community of Chicago, he was, nevertheless, authorized to say that its doors would always be opened "to the sick and suffering of all parties, without asking, or investigating, as to their creed, religion, or profession." In this connection we feel authorized to state here again that the same general and unbiased rule will be strictly adhered to in the future (re the Michael Reese Hospital).

    It is natural that the regulation and conducting of an institution of this kind, without any previous practice or knowledge of its workings, would be 5attended with considerable trouble and difficulty. Still the institution was managed properly and without interruption. On the whole it proved a success, with encouraging prospects for the future. While in this most prosperous condition, the fire of 1871 put a stop to our ambition. The hospital was destroyed. During all this period (since the fire) the work of the association was pursued with the usual vigor and energy, but the people keenly felt the want, yet had not sufficient means to rebuild the hospital, when, as it seems, in proper time the Messrs. Henry and Joseph Frank, who had the charge as trustees of a charitable fund bequeathed to their disposition by the late Michael Reese, Esq., of California, generously proposed to turn over $30,000 of said fund to the U. H. R. Association toward the rebuilding of their hospital, provided it be named now and henceforth the "Michael Reese Hospital." No less generous were Mrs. Henrietta Rosenfeld and Jacob Rosenberg, Esq., who were in possession of some special funds. They donated $50,000 of said funds to be reserved as a sinking fund, the interest of which to be applied toward the maintenance of the hospital.

    6

    Finally, we take occasion to remark that the hospital, with the ground on which it is built, is and will remain the property of the U. H. R. Association, and will be worked and managed by the executive board of the Association. The respective parties who so generously assisted and endowed it with such practical means, claim no further interests, no more individual preference, save that of its name, in order to perpetuate the memory of their generous and esteemed kinsman.

    The Corner Stone. (Speech by) Mr. M. M. Gerstley, in behalf of the Board of the U. H. R. A. The first Hebrew Relief Society in this city was called ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3
  • The Occident -- October 04, 1889
    A New Hospital Project

    Seems to develop itself among our Russo-Polish Israelites in this city. We have before us an open letter in the Jargon language from Dr. M. N. Regentowitch, 189 Maxwell Street, who in earnest and sincere language urges his countrymen and co-religionists, who owe it to themselves and the community at large to move at once in the erection of a hospital.

    His brochure is replete with reasons why his people should have a hospital of their own and indicates with simple plans how such an institution could be inaugurated and maintained. He makes this plan the basis of the Alexian Brothers Hospital, which started in a small way and has become one of the foremost charity institutions of Chicago. He refers to a Chebra who once asked that all Jewish Lodges and Societies should send a delegate to a mass meeting for the purpose of establishing such a hospital, but that this project was never followed up.

    2

    He lays considerable stress on the need of his Jewish patients, that they may not be contaminated with trefa (ritually unclean) food, and should receive attention from their co-religionists and so forth, when inmates of the hospital. We would suggest that the promoters of this hospital call their mass meeting during choul hamold next and we shall do all we can to aid them in perfecting their plans.

    Seems to develop itself among our Russo-Polish Israelites in this city. We have before us an open letter in the Jargon language from Dr. M. N. Regentowitch, 189 Maxwell Street, ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 15, 1890
    A Fair Amount....Division of the Proceeds from the Jewish Benefit Ball

    The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association has again achieved an excellent financial success and, as usual, it has distributed the large sum to the many benevolent institutions in the most liberal manner. The Board of Executives held a meeting, yesterday, in which the division of the net proceeds, amounting to $11,550 was to be definitely decided. The fund has been allotted as follows:

    Michael Reese Hospital (H. V. Bemis Foundation) $ 500
    Jewish Training School 4,500
    Labor Office of the Young Men's Hebrew Charity 4,500
    Labor Office of the Young Men's Hebrew Association 1,300
    West Side Evening School 100
    Policemen's Benevolent Association 100
    Firemen's Benevolent Association 100
    German Home for the Aged 200
    Charity - Hospital 150
    Bureau of Justice 100
    Total $11,550

    The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Association has again achieved an excellent financial success and, as usual, it has distributed the large sum to the many benevolent institutions in the most ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3