The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 30, 1913
    They Are All the Same

    We must admit that the Independent Order B'rith Abraham has learned a great deal from the recent occurrences in the Jewish lodges, and that at its last convention the delegates carried through many reforms. If this should continue there is a basis for hope that this order will eventually become that order which will really represent Jewish interests on all fronts.

    The adopted resolution, that nomination and election of grand officers should be conducted in a more democratic manner, is a great step forward in improving the lodge system; in due time the grand office patriots will be abolished.

    2

    Yet even the convention of the Independent Order B'rith Abraham was unable to display that true brotherly spirit which should have been the essence of such a convention. A resolution, to the effect that a member of the organization who is old and feeble and can no longer pay his dues, shall have his dues advanced by the lodge and shall afterwards deduct it from the endowment, failed of passage.

    This ordinarily implies that the Order is seeking to evade the payment of endowments in case of death. It is seeking means of preventing the old and feeble, the sick and disabled from maintaining their dues payments in order to scratch them, as it is called in lodge lingo. If a man who has been a member of the order for thirty or forty years, has paid his dues regularly, has constantly bought the usual number of tickets to balls, picnics, or other affairs, has paid the fixed penalty for not attending meetings, funerals, or weddings, becomes too old and ailing to pay dues, his lodge brothers do not assure his widow his insurance, but on the contrary, they immediately scratch him, and erase him from the membership list.

    3

    The resolution to raise a fund for members who are unable to work and earn a livelihood was adopted only after the Grand Master convinced the delegates that the percentage of these unfortunates is so small that it will not effect the order and that it would be a good advertisement of the benevolence of the lodge.

    There is no reason why one should receive insurance if he becomes blind accidentally, but should not get even expenses with which to pay his dues if he loses his sight through old age. Why should one receive $500 for losing his hands or feet in a street car accident and not be advanced fifteen dollars a year for the rest of his life when the same organs are unable to function on account of old age.

    4

    If true brotherly spirit would prevail among the lodge brothers such a thing would never occur. Let us hope that in the near future our lodges shall be more saturated with the spirit of brotherhood, which is the basis of our fraternal organizations. In the mean time they are all the same.........dollar organizations.

    We must admit that the Independent Order B'rith Abraham has learned a great deal from the recent occurrences in the Jewish lodges, and that at its last convention the delegates ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 09, 1914
    The People's Order of Chicago

    The People's Order, a new Jewish organization, has just been recently organized in Chicago, and because this order differs somewhat in principle from other orders, it well deserves our attention.

    For the past few years much has been said and written about the old systems prevailing in other orders, particularly about cases in which officials of the organizations made personal use of the monies entrusted to them. The chief task of the People's Order is to correct these evils by proper management and honesty and to serve as an example for similar institutions.

    The principles of the new order are as follows:

    1. Every by-law of the Order shall be approved of through a referendum by all members of the order.

    2

    2. Every member receives a monthly report on all transactions, as well as an accurately written statement of the financial condition.

    3. No insurance, in a death case of a member, shall go for any other purpose.

    4. Insurance must be paid in less than thirty days.

    5. The by-laws are worded in such a manner that it is impossible for officers to defraud or introduce any other irregularities.

    6. It must always be possible for the members to find out the financial status of the order, and to obtain other necessary information.

    7. Friendship and true loyalty to one another will be taught. Entertainment in a decent and clean manner will be encouraged.

    The members and their wives, and those who wish to join the Order, are 3requested to come to the West Side Auditorium, Center and Taylor Streets, Mar. 11, at 7:30 P.M., for a medical examination.

    The Organizing Committee

    The People's Order, a new Jewish organization, has just been recently organized in Chicago, and because this order differs somewhat in principle from other orders, it well deserves our attention. ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 02, 1914
    The Jewish National Workers Alliance Becomes Active

    The Jewish National Workers Alliance, organized only a few years ago, took out its charter Jan. 6, 1913.

    Its charter is the best of any order in the country, fully in accord with the latest insurance demands and government laws. Its insurance system, being the same as that of an insurance company, is one of the best in America.

    The organization releases policies of from $100 to $2,000. It also carries sick benefits of $10.

    The order is a body of Jewish workers, nationalistically inclined. The Alliance is national radical in its mission, progressive in its conduct, modern in its insurance system, and has much in its activities for the Jewish masses.

    2

    The order is comparatively a young one, not having had the opportunity to become known everywhere. Yet, it has nearly 80 branches in 13 cities of America, and main offices in New York.

    Every Jew nationalistically inclined should belong to this organization; everyone opposed to the destruction of the Jewish people, who wishes to fight against assimilation, and every worker should become a member.

    The Alliance will set aside the week beginning Nov. 27th, throughout the entire country, for mass meetings, lectures, literary, and agitation meetings for the purpose of acquainting the Jewish masses with the ideas, aims and practical activities of the Alliance, and this is bound to bring success.

    The Alliance has every opportunity to develop and grow during this agitation week, if everyone will do his duty and bring a prospect for membership.

    The Jewish National Workers Alliance, organized only a few years ago, took out its charter Jan. 6, 1913. Its charter is the best of any order in the country, fully ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II D 1, II D 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 09, 1916
    [An Appeal to Jewish Workers to Join the Jewish National Workers Alliance of America] (Adv.)

    Jewish workers, join the Jewish National Workers Alliance of America! What is the Jewish National Workers Alliance? This question can best be answered by the following excerpt from our declaration of principles:

    "Recognizing the need for assistance in case of death, want or sickness, and conscious also of the discrimination and injustice which Jews face in our present society, we Jewish workers have found it necessary to create an organization which has set itself to:

    "1. Give its members sick and death benefits.

    "2. Strengthen through education the national and social consciousness of the Jewish masses in order to fight against assimilation; participate in the revival of an international Jewish movement.

    2

    "3. Function actively in the labor movement which seeks to improve the condition of the working class and to bring about a new and better social order."

    OUR MATERIAL BENEFITS

    The Alliance gives in benefits to its members: Insurance policies ranging from $100 to $2,000, the premiums of which are paid according to age.

    It also gives ten dollars a week consumptive and sick benefit. Special benefits are provided for accident insurance and "paid up" policies. The Alliance offers the most modern type of insurance policies.

    Men and women of 18 and over are accepted.

    Join with us; let's work together!

    If you are a Jewish worker, you should be interested in the Jewish National Workers Alliance.

    3

    As a Jewish radical, you should recognize your obligation and join the organized Jewish workers who are struggling for national and social emancipation. You should join with those who are fighting against discrimination, and for the recognition of Jewish rights--with those who seek Jewish emancipation.

    Jewish workers, do not remain aloof! Through an organization of all nationally conscious Jewish workers, let us build a powerful Jewish workers' order which may act as a model to others.

    Your place is in the Jewish National Workers Alliance! Come, build your own institution. Join one of our four Chicago Branches! For information, apply to the District Committee Secretary, Samuel J. Stulman, 3544 W. 12th Place.

    Jewish workers, join the Jewish National Workers Alliance of America! What is the Jewish National Workers Alliance? This question can best be answered by the following excerpt from our declaration ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, I D 2 a 3, II D 2, III A
  • Jewish Labor World -- November 27, 1917
    The City Central Committee of the Workmen's Circle and its Task By M. Strausman

    The position of the City Central Committee of the Workmen's Circle is not clear to several members. Of what does it consist? What is its task? I shall attempt, as much as possible, to give a brief survey of the miscellaneous activities and work of the City Central Committee of the Workmen's Circle.

    As is known, the City Central Committee of the Workmen's Circle in Chicago is composed of delegates from the Workmen's Circle branches in the following manner: There are exactly forty-four branches. Two delegates are annually elected from each branch and the committee is composed of eighty-eight delegates. These delegates are divided into various departments, for example, the Labor Lyceum department, Cemetery department, Educational department, etc. Every separate department represents a small but very active organization(in which the elected officials conduct regular meetings). On the whole, these departments are responsible to the City Central Committee, when a report must be given of their work and activities.

    2

    All these departments are discussed at the regular meetings of the City Central Committee. Several delegates present certain recommendations from their branches or complaints against the action of certain departments. All these matters are collectively discussed by the delegates and instructions are given to the various departments about their further activities. As may be seen, the branches of the Workmen's Circle are informed of the work and activities of the various departments by their delegates. Speaking of the activities of the various departments, I can not refrain from extending credit for their good and noble work, to the Labor Lyceum Committee. They have made exceptional progress. Taking into consideration the war, which has cast a horrible gloom upon everybody, the Labor Lyceum Committee (naturally with the support of the branches) purchased a magnificent and suitable site. It is to be hoped that if the Labor Lyceum Committee will still receive the support of the branches, we can soon expect a temple for the Workmen's Circle in Chicago.

    The same can also be said about the Cemetery department, which is administered by an able committee.

    3

    The Educational Committee did not encounter great success last year. There are, naturally, various reasons.

    The City Central Committee has a permanent control committee, that controls all money of the various departments and reports to the City Central Committee. The City Central Committee also plays an important role in community life. As a large and strong body, it is represented by its delegates at various conferences and undertakings in all branches of the Socialist and labor movement, which receives the fullest sympathy and support from the Workmen's Circle in Chicago.

    The position of the City Central Committee of the Workmen's Circle is not clear to several members. Of what does it consist? What is its task? I shall attempt, as ...

    Jewish
    II D 2, I E
  • Jewish Labor World -- March 09, 1918
    The Report of Territorial Conference of the Workmen's Circle

    Friend J. Kravitz, chairman of the District Organizational Committee, opened the meeting of the Chicago Territorial Conference, Sunday, March 3, at 2 P. M. in the Palace Hall, 1145 Blue Island Avenue.

    After declaring that the purpose of this meeting is to discuss recommendations to the 18th Annual Convention of the Workmen's Circle, and also to nominate 14 delegates as candidates to this convention, he asked for a temporary chairman before the election. Friend Benenson, of branch #162, was unanimously elected as temporary chairman.

    2

    The chairman, Friend L. Benenson, called upon Dr. S. D. Spivak, secretary of the sanitarium of the Jewish Consumptive Relief Society, to state his object. He said that the sanitarium of which he is one of the directors, was founded by the consumptive workers; that this institution is of and for the working masses; and that it is not in the hands of the so-called rich contributors. He further said that a general convention will take place in Chicago, May 24, called by the organization which he represents. He expressed his wish that we, as a branch of the labor movement and, also as one of the strongest organizations of the Chicago Jewry, will be represented at this convention through every branch in the city. We agreed to the request and

    3

    the delegates promise to introduce the question before their respective branch.

    The Credential Committee reported that of the 42 branches in our district, 35 were represented; that 40 delegates were present; and that the District Organizations Committee is also represented by Friends Kravitz and Levin.

    The following recommendations were proposed at the conference to be recommended to the 18th Annual Convention:

    1. Concerning the clause of the Constitution which does not permit any police, detectives, and saloon keepers to become members in the Workmen's Circle, shall also include hotel proprietors.

    4

    2. Friend Silverstein proposed that the clause that makes it impossible to appeal to the grievance committee against a charge, which was dismissed by a branch should be abolished in order to have a democratic organization.

    3. The one per cent admission fees shall be abolished.

    4. The educational committee shall send capable lecturers throughout the country.

    5. The cities, with the exception of New York, shall get better educational programs.

    5

    6. The Friend shall be published weekly instead of daily.

    7. The Workmen's Circle shall adopt a better position toward radical schools.

    8. Two or three pages of the Friend shall be published in English.

    9. A special fund shall be set aside to organize English speaking branches.

    10. The general office shall employ two paid officials in every large city.

    6

    11. The Friend shall have more literary reading material in lieu of the present general, specific, and abstract Workmen's Circle news.

    12. The Friend's mailing list shall be improved.

    13. Each important city shall have one paid hospital.

    14. The educational committee shall establish classes in citizenship.

    15. Hospitals and dispensaries shall be established.

    7

    16. A special fund shall be set aside to help build labor lyceums.

    17. Expelled workers shall be accepted by the Workmen's Circle, during the summer month, according to their age when they first entered the Workmen's Circle.

    18. An old age fund shall be established which shall later serve for the establishment of an aged home.

    19. Action shall be taken to help World War Veterans.

    8

    20. The Workmen's Circle shall permit an increase in every insurance policy.

    21. Consumption benefits shall be raised to $250.

    22. Disability policies shall exist in one of our branches.

    After this, delegates were elected to the convention.

    Friend J. Kravitz, chairman of the District Organizational Committee, opened the meeting of the Chicago Territorial Conference, Sunday, March 3, at 2 P. M. in the Palace Hall, 1145 Blue ...

    Jewish
    I E, III B 4, I A 2 a, II D 3, II D 2, II B 2 d 2
  • Jewish Labor World -- July 29, 1918
    Fewer and Larger Branches of the Workmen's Circle.

    The Workmen's Circle possesses over forty branches in Chicago. This number is not so small, it should please every one whose ambition is to see our movement great and influential.

    When, however, we see that the number of Workmen's Circle members only reach 4,000, then we must admit that we have too many branches. And of what do the good qualities and faults of the small branches consist of? A large branch has a possibility of raising a sufficient amount to pay for a decent meeting place. A large branch, most of the time, possesses a larger number of intelligent members, and is thereby enabled to elect a better secretary and other necessary officials, whereas a small branch, with a poorer element, is compelled to meet in a small room, without air and other comforts, and is also compelled to elect a secretary with little experience and no ability.

    It very often happens in the existing small branches that of their thirty or forty members, only a few come to the election of officers, and not having enough members from which to choose, they are compelled to elect officers that have no idea of their task. They are compelled to take the office because 2they cannot help themselves. The branch cannot exist without officers. This results, often times, in the books being kept without a system, and the treasury suffers without the person being aware that he is using the money.

    But you must consider the circumstances. The Workmen's Circle consists mainly of workers, and to our sorrow, workers cannot boast that one-hundred percent of their ranks possess an elementary education. Our intelligent elements are limited, which proves that the smaller branches must get along with the poor elements. No one is to be blamed, but the fault lies in that, instead of having our 4,000 members in ten branches and each branch having members with sufficient ability, we have forty branches of which many have not enough intelligent elements.

    The best plan would be to unite four or five branches - organize these branches according to the districts in which the members live, so that a few branches will be on the West Side, some in the Douglas Park and some on the Northwest Side. Such a system would save hundreds of dollars in rent and postage, every undertaking would be sure of a success, educational work would be possible; such branches could engage secretaries and other officials of ability.

    The Workmen's Circle possesses over forty branches in Chicago. This number is not so small, it should please every one whose ambition is to see our movement great and influential. ...

    Jewish
    III A, II D 2
  • Forward -- February 22, 1919
    Forty-five instead of forty

    All of the progressive Jewish element, who have not as yet had the opportunity to become members of that great Jewish radical workers organization, on account of their age, have the opportunity, to join the Workmens Circle.

    According to the last convention referendum, new members will now be accepted up to the age of 45 years instead of 40 years, as in the past.

    Progressive Jewish workers and organization will surely take advantage of this reform, and will become a part of this great radical army that form the Workmen's circle. For more information inquire: Workmen's Circle 175 East Broadway N.Y.

    All of the progressive Jewish element, who have not as yet had the opportunity to become members of that great Jewish radical workers organization, on account of their age, have ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 2, I C
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 08, 1919
    The Interesting Case against the Progressive Order of the West

    The case of Mrs. Chayd Neshelman, 50 years old, of 2908 West 12th Street, against the Progressive Order of the West, is one of the most interesting cases ever to come before the local courts.

    About two years ago, Mrs. Neshelman was awarded five hundred dollars from the Progressive Order of the West by the Circuit Court. Mrs. Neshelman, over two years ago, had sprained an arm. According to her policy held with the Progressive Order of the West, she was entitled to insurance. The Order denied this fact, so she started legal procedure against it. A jury awarded her five hundred dollars. Her lawyer was Mr. Max M. Korshak.

    The Order appealed the case, but for certain technical reasons, it was thrown out of the higher court to be returned to the lower courts for a 2new trial. This occurred in the summer of 1918.

    In March 1919, Mr. Korshak began a new trial. The Grand Counsel of the Order, Samuel Makon, refused to accept the case, or to give information regarding the Order's representatives in Chicago.

    Mr. Korshak then applied to the insurance department of the State, receiving the information he needed there. As a rule, when a lawyer calls for information such as Mr. Korshak asked of Mr. Makon, a second lawyer, it is generally furnished.

    Several weeks ago, Mr. Harry Wolf, one of the supreme officers of the Order in Chicago, brought to trial, not only Mrs. Neshelman, but also Mr. Neshelman, her husband. Mr. Wolf accused them of seeking to extort money from the Order illegally, and wished to 3oust them, through court procedure as members in the Order.

    It was now necessary for Mr. Korshak to acquaint himself with the rules and by-laws of the Order. He, therefore, wrote to the main office for a copy of their Constitution. This correspondence was ignored. He, once more, had to resort to the insurance department of the State for aid.

    Then the Grand Lodge began to deny that it had anything to do with the prosecution of Mr. and Mrs. Neshelman, stating that the procedure was instituted by the local lodge to which Mr. and Mrs. Neshelman belonged.

    "This does not appear to be so," said lawyer Korshak, "because Harry Wolf, who signed the prosecutions, does not belong to the Palestine Lodge to which the Neshelmans belong."

    4

    The Neshelmans are aged people. If they are ousted from the Order, they will not be able to join another lodge because of their extreme age. A jury awarded Mrs. Neshelman five hundred dollars. A doctor explained that she will never be able to use her hand again. But the Order turns a deaf ear, and carries on a huge legal fight costing hundreds of dollars against a poor old woman.

    Mr. Korshak has at last made a statement that he will instigate a litigation which will forbid the Order to operate lodges in the State of Illinois.

    The case of Mrs. Chayd Neshelman, 50 years old, of 2908 West 12th Street, against the Progressive Order of the West, is one of the most interesting cases ever to ...

    Jewish
    II D 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 14, 1919
    The Brith Avraham Convention (Summary)

    (This Order is one of a group of sick benefit and insurance lodges throughout the country. Trans.)

    The Brith Avraham (Brotherhood of Abraham) opened its 45th annual convention at Atlantic City yesterday. Three hundred delegates from all parts of the country attended.

    The speakers, Councilman Harry Kassman, Mr. Joseph Hagerlain, president of Pride of Atlanta Lodge No. 520, and Mr. H. Harrison, of New York dwelt on various topics lauding Jewish patriotism in America, welcoming delegates to the conference, presenting the Grand Master, Mr. Samuel Dorf with the key to the city and a diamond fob for his 27 years as Grand Master of the Order and presenting Grand Secretary, Mr. J. Lazerman with a Silver Service, all in the name of the Atlantic City Lodge. The wish was also expressed that the Peace Conference in Paris will assure Jews a home in Palestine.

    2

    Mr. Dorf thanked everyone and spoke of the conditions of the Order, financially and otherwise, stressing the necessity for increasing membership rates and installing a new system of paying according to age rates. He also tendered his resignation.

    Much discussing regarding the choice of a committee and a temporary chairman ensued, but this question was finally settled. The next meeting was set for Monday morning at 10 A.M.

    Many important questions and resolutions are to be presented by the delegates at this convention. One requesting the Order to favor Zionism is sure to be accepted because of the favorable attitude of Mr. Dorf and most of the delegates.

    The Grand Secretary's report shows that the Order counted on the first of January, 32,297 members in 261 lodges. The larges number, 16,912 members are between 50 and 60 years old; 6,514, between 45 and 49; 4,347, between 40-44; the rest being under 40 years of age.

    3

    In 1916 there were 904 deaths in the Order, making 14 deaths per 1,000 members. In 1917 there were 895 deaths or 18 per 1,000; in 1918, 810 deaths, or 25 per 1,000.

    From Jan. 1, 1917 to April 1, 1919, there were 1941 deaths, for which the sum of $ 971,102 was paid as death benefits.

    On January 1, 1917, the Order had 60 lodges, and 24 more were added since then. In the two years previous to 1919, 91 lodges were lost, 32 united, a total of 123 lodges, so that on January of this year, there were only 261 lodges.

    The funds of the Brith Avraham, as of the first of January are as follows:

    $103,768 Reserve fund.
    $ 8,245 Endowment fund.
    $ 2,163 General fund.
    $ 1,925 Disability fund.

    (This Order is one of a group of sick benefit and insurance lodges throughout the country. Trans.) The Brith Avraham (Brotherhood of Abraham) opened its 45th annual convention at Atlantic ...

    Jewish
    II D 2, III B 4, III H, III C