The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1871
    (No headline)

    While workers and handicraftsmen immediately start to lay the foundation of a new home, and every morning emerge from their provisory shacks to go to work, the petite bourgeoisie (uder kleine Mittelstand) is in a predicament from which nothing but help from outside can lead them. All the small shopkeepers, inn-keepers, and clerks have lost through the fire their means of existence; on claims against insurance companies, that frequently can be realized only by way of court actions. No new existence can be founded ... with the practical attitude characteristic of them. The Israelites have been essayed a solution on October 15, by nominating a special committee whose task will be to collect money among the Israelites of other cities. This money is not to be used to alleviate the need of the present moment, but for the reconstruction of the enterprise of the small Israelite business people. Permanent help is in the end cheaper than temporary, that has constantly to be repeated. It is better to give a man a chance, through a gift of $50, to again make his living, than to have to protect him against freezing and starvation, all through the winter, with $3 or $4 a week. Of course, in granting relief by such larger sums, it is necessary to employ the utmost caution and to dispose of genuine knowledge of human character. The Israelites who, in their charity work, were always inclined toward the described principle, are perhaps better prepared for its application in the present emergency than others. The German Aid Society, the lodges, the craft associations, 2likewise possess some or all of the pre-suppositions and information necessary for the application of this policy. They should make the support of the special cases, the permanent removal of neediness through the expenditure of larger sums, their main task. It is true that this will make more work than the distribution of daily rations, but its effect will be permanent and a far greater blessing.

    While workers and handicraftsmen immediately start to lay the foundation of a new home, and every morning emerge from their provisory shacks to go to work, the petite bourgeoisie (uder ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • Chicago Times -- December 10, 1871
    The Jewish Relief Work

    It is estimated that though our Jewish citizens have lost not less than $20,000,000, they immediately after the fire took systematic measures to provide for the relief of those of their brethren who had been burned out. The result of these measures was that though there are 15,000 Jews in Chicago, not one of them has been seen to ask for aid of the general or special relief committees of the Gentile.

    The lodges of B'nai-Israel of this city at once made an appeal to the brethren throughout the United States, which was literally responded to; $18,000 having been received here, and distributed among the needy, up to November 5. In order, however, to furnish permanent relief for the suffering families of Israelities, $50,000 more are required, and it is hoped that this will be furnished by the Jews throughout the country.

    It is estimated that though our Jewish citizens have lost not less than $20,000,000, they immediately after the fire took systematic measures to provide for the relief of those of ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 23, 1871
    [Relief and Aid of the Fire Victims and the Foreigner]

    The first report of the Chicago Relief and Aid Society contains a tabulation of the 18,478 families according to nationalities who up to November 18 had received aid. The word 'nationality' is not to be understood in the passport sense of the word, but as belonging to a certain stock. Englishmen, as such, are separated from Scotch, Irish, Wallisians and Canadians. Poles are not counted as Russians, Prussians or Austrians, even though there exists no Polish state. Spaniards are not separated from Spanish Creoles, and Swedes, Danes and Norwegians are summed up as Scandinavians. Native Americans of black skin are called Africans, while Bohemians are enumerated as such, not as Civleithanic Austrians. Against these classifications nobody has raised any protest. But fate so willed it, that forty-three families are designated as "Jewish," and immediately a Mr. Philipp Stein creates havoc in the Chicago Tribune. He says:

    "The Jews once were a nation, but everybody knows they long since ceased to be one. A nation is a totality of a people bound together by a common language and common customs..... The Jews in the last two centuries have 2uniformly adopted the language and the customs of the peoples among whom they live. In England they are Englishmen; in Germany, Germans; in America, Americans..... The differentiating quality is their religion. It is not the first time in the history of our city that the error to which I take exception has been committed."

    Nay, and it is not the first time either that we have to take exception to the error on which the intended correction is based. Mr. Stein desires that the Jews should have ceased to be a special nationality (Stammesgenossenschaft), but he errs if he thinks that what he wishes is already a fact. It is even in France, Germany, England and America only very partly true.....And is the Jew in Bucharest a Rumanian, In Constantinople a Turk, in Belgrade a Serb, and in Valparaiso a Creole? He does not dream of it. The forty-three families in the tabulation who are classified as Jews called themselves Jewish. Does Mr. Stein expect the young secretary, who records the statements of the aid seeker in the lists, to correct these statements from ethnological, national, religious viewpoints?..........

    The English word "nation" and the German word "nation" are far from being completely synonymous. In English "nation" means a political unit that may 3comprise very divergent ethnological types. In this sense France is a nation. Even Turkey in spite of its inextricable jumble of peoples is a nation. In the German language, however, the concept of "nation" conveys the idea of identical descent.....Mr. Stein's protest has been written in English, but thought out in German....

    The Jews have ceased to be a nation, but are a separate nationality; i.e., they still are a special "Stammesart" (stock) and will remain so until the differentiating physiological characteristics [will have become either obliterated entirely or otherwise diluted by intermarriage.]

    The first report of the Chicago Relief and Aid Society contains a tabulation of the 18,478 families according to nationalities who up to November 18 had received aid. The word ...

    Jewish
    I C, I C, I C, II D 10, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 25, 1871
    [Relief and Aid of the Jewish Victims of the Fire]

    Thirty or forty Jewish families are announced among the 18,478 who are being assisted by the Relief and Aid Society. These are mostly Slavic Jews, because German Jews consider themselves usually as Germans and have become more or less accustomed to regard their religion as a personal household affair and not a national barrier. Jews who have immigrated to Chicago from Germany also consider themselves Germans. The Polish, Hungarian and Bohemian Jews, on the other hand, will surrender themselves to Germanism only if the German-Americans can exert sufficient attraction on this peculiarly tenacious race. It will certainly be more advantageous for the Germans to strengthen their power through such recruiting than to lose, in this country, what they had already gained in Central Europe. It is precisely the wholesale trade which in Chicago is by far too little in German hands, and, if the Jews here feel themselves rebuffed by the Germans, they will educate their children to be Anglo-Americans; the result will be a de facto loss for the German cause.

    2

    (This little piece might owe its existence to some polite protest by Dr. Chvonik against the long article on the matter of the forty-three Jewish families on December 23. The emphasis is slightly shifted from the underscoring of differences, to the desire for assimilation. The last sentence seems to plead for inter-marriage, with an argument that Bismarck occasionally used: "Race mixture is not only biologically highly desirable, but, in the case of the daughters of the very rich Jews, financially even more so."

    Thirty or forty Jewish families are announced among the 18,478 who are being assisted by the Relief and Aid Society. These are mostly Slavic Jews, because German Jews consider themselves ...

    Jewish
    I C, I C, I C, II D 10, II D 10, III A, III A
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- April 30, 1872
    The Report of the Special Aid Committee of the Hebrew Relief Association Was Read the Day before Yesterday in a Meeting in Standard Hall, Abraham Hart Presiding.

    The committee received large quantities of victuals, clothes, and so forth, from Cincinnati. The clothes alone were valued at $5,000. Money contributions amounted to $20,980. The largest sum came from the Adas Jeshurun Community in New York, $2,027, from other communities in that city $9,303, and from Chicago Israelites $2,149.

    2

    The Hebrew Relief Association voted on January 21, unanimously, to rebuild its hospital. The fund for that purpose has reached the sum of $5,710. In this is comprised $250 for the $5,000 that Grand Duke Alexis gave to Chicago fire victims......

    The committee received large quantities of victuals, clothes, and so forth, from Cincinnati. The clothes alone were valued at $5,000. Money contributions amounted to $20,980. The largest sum came from ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • [Association documents] -- May 05, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A communication of Persian relief fund was read....A collection in the Board meeting amounting to $100 was made, and upon motion, J. Mayer and F. Neinbach, with G. Eliel as chairman were appointed a committee to collect for Persian fund.

    A communication of Persian relief fund was read....A collection in the Board meeting amounting to $100 was made, and upon motion, J. Mayer and F. Neinbach, with G. Eliel as ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • Chicago Times -- October 02, 1872
    The Chicago Fire and What the Various Foreign Groups Did to Alleviate the Sufferings of the Fire Victims

    B'nai B'rith: No order was more prompt or more energetic in the work of charity than the B'nai B'rith lodges of this city. Soon after the great catastrophy there was a meeting of the various lodges the following gentlemen were appointed a central committee on relief: Dr. B. Felsenthal, chairman; J. L. Gatrert, superintendent, and Messrs. Henry Greenebaum, Charles Nosminsky, B. W. Seligman, W. Felsenthal, A. Moses, and J. L. Unna. The following summary will show how ably and conscientously the committee did its work. Contributions: From lodges of the IOBB, $19,195.12. From other societies, $3,952.73. From individuals and firms, $2,335.60. Total receipts, $25,483.45. Disbursements: To thirty seven members of Ramah Lodge, $4,565.45. To twenty three members of Wittel Lodge, $2,525. To forty one members of Jonathan Lodge, $4,540. To nineteen members of Maurice Mayer Lodge, $1,940. To forty nine members of Sovereignity Lodge, $4,275. To thirteen non-residents members, $1, 386. To non-members of the order, $1,739.75. Through the United Relief Association, $2, 949.25. For expenses of the committee, salaries, etc., $698.65. Total disbursements, $24.618. 65. Balance in bank, $864.80, totaling, $25,483.45.

    2

    There were also received thirty-two cases of clothing, blankets, bedding, etc., which were distributed under the kind and excellent management of Mrs. Henry Greenebaum, Mrs. Charles Kosminsky, and Mrs. Adolph Moses.

    The United Hebrew Relief Association took active part in relieving the wants among the sufferers of its own nationality. The sum total of its receipts and disbursements is $18,000 in money and about $5,000 worth of clothing contributed by the Hebrews of Cincinnati. The largest portion of the money came from generous people from other cities, in sums from ten to two hundred dollars, but a portion was contributed by the different Hebrew societies composing the association. The St.Joseph Hospital on North La Salle Street, which was destroyed by the fire belonged to the United Hebrews. It will shortly be rebuilt. An active part was performed in disbursing the relief by J. Rosenthal, Esq.; Abraham Mart, president of the association; Philip Stein, its secretary and Nelson Morris, its treasurer.

    B'nai B'rith: No order was more prompt or more energetic in the work of charity than the B'nai B'rith lodges of this city. Soon after the great catastrophy there was ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • Jewish Advance -- August 09, 1878
    (Lodges)

    Maimonides Society:

    Adolph Moses, President; George A. Braham, Secretary; Chevre Schomre Hatas meets every second Sunday at Aurora Turner Hall; President, A. Feingold; Vice-President, J. Wachenheimer; Treas. L. Lazor; Secretary, E. Drinkelma.

    Society of Benevolence and for the Relief of the Sick:

    Meets at 112 & 114 E. Randolph Street, on the second Sunday of each month. W. Levy, President; M. Ohnstein, Secretary.

    Maimonides Society: Adolph Moses, President; George A. Braham, Secretary; Chevre Schomre Hatas meets every second Sunday at Aurora Turner Hall; President, A. Feingold; Vice-President, J. Wachenheimer; Treas. L. Lazor; Secretary, ...

    Jewish
    II D 10
  • [Association documents] -- September 03, 1878
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    Mr. G. Syndacker applied to the board for use of the Standard Club for permission to give a concert in the Auditorium of the Temple on Tuesday, 10th inst. for the benefit of the yellow fever sufferers in the South, and on motion the application was unanimously granted.

    Mr. G. Syndacker applied to the board for use of the Standard Club for permission to give a concert in the Auditorium of the Temple on Tuesday, 10th inst. for ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 b, II D 10
  • Jewish Advance -- September 06, 1878
    (No headline)

    "The Pride of Chicago - No. 41 of the Improved Order of F.S.of I", is the modest name of a new lodge which has been installed, last Sunday, by M.K. Cohen, Esq., of Philadelphia, the Grand Treasurer of the Order. This is the first lodge of this order in Chicago. The second one will be installed next Sunday.

    "The Pride of Chicago - No. 41 of the Improved Order of F.S.of I", is the modest name of a new lodge which has been installed, last Sunday, by M.K. ...

    Jewish
    II D 10