The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • [Association documents] -- January 28, 1872
    Sinai Congregation, Board of Directors Minutes

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. H. R. A. for each paying member, one dollar.

    A communication of U. (nited) H. (ebrew) R. (elief) A. (ssociation) was received and placed on file. It was moved and seconded that the secretary issue an order to U. ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- October 10, 1878
    (No headline)

    From the Superintendent's report (of the United Hebrew Relief Association for the year 1877--1878) it appears that "in the past year $5,946.80 were expended" by the Society, of which $1,153.60 were spent on salaries, visiting expenses, postage, etc. and $4,792.20 distributed among the poor, in money and kinds, to the relief of 1,316 resident persons, besides some occasional applicants, and "over 150-tons of coal, all paid up", yet in reserve. In addition to this, the Ladies' Sewing Society supplied 121 poor families with clothes, and distributed 4,757 yards of goods, and 23 blankets.

    The Ladies' Sewing Society of the West Side contributed 192 articles, and that of the North Side 43 articles.

    The West Side Ladies' Sewing Society gave besides, clothes, etc. to 12 families.

    The North Side Ladies' Sewing Society also supplied a number of families with clothes; but we have no report.

    The K.S.B. Lodges of the city, viz., Chicago Lodge and Teutonia Lodge, gave notice of their withdrawal from the Association.

    The balance on hand is $854.58 and an additional $701.40; total $1,555.90. The hospital fund amounts to $2,186.92.

    From the Superintendent's report (of the United Hebrew Relief Association for the year 1877--1878) it appears that "in the past year $5,946.80 were expended" by the Society, of which $1,153.60 ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- November 15, 1878
    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. Ladies' Societies

    Many of our congregations have also ladies' societies, whose special mission it is to work for the interest of the congregation by arranging strawberry festivals, fairs, hops, balls, etc., for the benefit of the temple. The ladies always have some tickets to sell, and have very sharp eyes to distinguish their sure victims from a whole crowd. But besides this, there are in this city some more ladies' societies, independent of the congregations. Of these, I will mention at present the "Sisters of Peace," "Sisters of Harmony," "Johannah Lodge of the Treuen Schwestern," and the "Young Ladies' Benevolent Society." Many a poor Jewish family blesses the names of these dear ladies.

    Many of our congregations have also ladies' societies, whose special mission it is to work for the interest of the congregation by arranging strawberry festivals, fairs, hops, balls, etc., for ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- November 15, 1878
    Chicago Sketches. by Ben Adam. United Hebrew Relief Association

    This organization was established in 1859. The members of the Ramah Lodge, the oldest Lodge of the famous order B'nai B'rith, in this city, were the first instigators of this charitable association. Right here, I will touch upon the sad fact, that there are here certain persons who are making it their special business to injure the name and character of this well managed institution, and by its last report it seems as though these persons have succeeded to injure it among the general public, which is withdrawing its support from the R. A. in a very distressing manner. How thinking, reasonable, and otherwise just and kind-hearted people, can doubt for a moment the integrity and honesty of an institution with which men like Hart, Greensfelder, Gerstley, Rosenberg, Eisendrath, Julius Rosenthal, Snydacker, Simons, Kozminsky, and many other prominent Israelites, were and are still connected, is a perfect mystery, and what is still more remarkable is the fact, that 2among the Kesher fraternity of this Association, and that our brethren from Russia and Poland, who furnish the most applicants for relief, entirely neglect to support the Society.

    As far as I know, they have no reason to complain, and no charges to substantiate against the Relief. Never before was this institution managed on such a sound business basis as during the last few years, since it is under the management of the very efficient and conscientious superintendent, Mr. F. Kish.

    This organization was established in 1859. The members of the Ramah Lodge, the oldest Lodge of the famous order B'nai B'rith, in this city, were the first instigators of this ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, I D 1 b, II A 2, II D 1, II F
  • Jewish Advance -- June 20, 1879
    Report of the Executive to the Delegates of the United Hebrew Relief Association of Chicago

    "Ladies and Gentlemen:

    Seventeen years have rolled by since a handful of Israelites formed the Relief Society. Beginning its life of charity under the strong and unrestrained impulse of the Jewish heart, there grew in the line of its program many evils. Without order or system, without means to detect impositions, without plan in the collection or distribution of its funds, its charity was abused, its kindly offices bestowed alike upon the deserving and undeserving, and in common with kindred societies, it tolerated if it did not create, in our midst a large number of unworthy pensioners. The most patent errors, at least, have been corrected. System has been introduced in the work of the Association; its charity is distributed by principle, and not by caprice. Prudence in the exercise of power, judicious investigation of the character, life and habits of the applicant, the establishment of rigid rules and strict adherence to them in practice, have in a great measure cured these evils.

    2

    Our present system of collecting the funds of the Association has been in use for many years. When the city was prosperous, when money was plenty, and before the financial crisis of 1863, that system served its purpose. Today, its usefulness is gone. The old circle of contributions is rapidly diminishing. Death has taken from us many a generous citizen. These vacancies in our ranks have never been filled. The increase of population has brought us an increase of pensioners. Nothing more. The burden of maintaining your charity is now borne by comparatively few generous citizens. Collecting committees find this work disheartening, and in some quarters of the City utterly unavailing.

    With our meagre funds we can only relieve temporary distress. The primary object of the Association should be, to give permanent relief, to place its sound and healthy applicants in a position where they will cease to need help, and will earn their own livelihood.

    There is one feature to which we wish to call your attention. Many of our applicants have daughters, strong,healthy, and well-advanced in womanhood. These daughters refuse (and are encouraged by their parents) to engage in household employments. They absolutely refuse to do housework of any kind. To do housework is degrading, they tell us.They feel as though it were dishonorable to engage as Domestics.

    3

    The statistics of the Association may afford some food for reflection. We give such matters as we have been able to collect.

    During the year we have relieved one-hundred and eighty-five resident-families, aggregating 981 persons, and about 275 strangers. Of the 185 resident-families, about 23 are new applicants. Sixteen families were transported to sister-cities. Of the families transported last year, six have returned, The Association maintains as regular pensioners, fourteen widows, and twenty-one women who have been deserted and left destitute by their worthless husbands. During the year, sixteen adults and twenty-one infant wards of the Association departed this life and were buried by the Association, at a cost of $36.30. We have expended $222.95 in medicines and medical aid, and consumed about 300 tons of coal.

    The Ladies of the several societies, as is their custom, have been of great service to the Association.

    The South-Side Sewing Society has expended, in the purchase of clothing, dry-goods, etc. nearly $1,200, and in addition thereto, they have distributed nearly $400. worth of made-up clothing of all kinds donated by individual members and by the West Side Sewing Society.

    The North and West Side Societies have been taking excellent care of the poor in their several districts. Not having their reports, we cannot detail

    4

    their work.

    Although very limited in its funds during the winter, the Association with its branches, has done some good work

    We have paid out in money obtained by Collections $4,600.
    From Other Sources 600.
    In Purchasing Coal 1,200.
    By the Ladies' Societies, Money and Goods aggregating more than 2,000.
    Making a Grand Total of $8,400.

    Chicago, June 15, 1879."

    "Ladies and Gentlemen: Seventeen years have rolled by since a handful of Israelites formed the Relief Society. Beginning its life of charity under the strong and unrestrained impulse of the ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, I C
  • Jewish Advance -- February 27, 1880
    (No headline)

    The work on the building of the Reese Hospital will probably begin in the Spring. The U. H. R. Association has purchased for the purpose the lot between Lake Ave. Cottage Place and 29th st., with an area of 208 by 54 feet.

    The work on the building of the Reese Hospital will probably begin in the Spring. The U. H. R. Association has purchased for the purpose the lot between Lake Ave. ...

    Jewish
    II D 3, II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- March 05, 1880
    (No headline)

    The ladies of the South Side Sewing Society closed their needle-work sessions last week. On last Wednesday they had a general meeting at the Standard Hall, at which the secretary read the following report: Amount on hand Mar. 5, 1879, $848,12 - Annual dues and donations, $798.00 - Donated by the little girls' 3ยข society, $4.00 - Total $1,650.12. For dry goods, $1,511.50 - Discount off, $21.12 - Janitor, sundry expenses, $28.15 - Total $1,513.53. Balance on hand, Mar. 3, 1880, $136.66.

    We have distributed all kinds of dry goods, including muslins, waterproof, blankets, bedding, etc., to between 160 and 170 families, including a total number of persons estimated at about 1,100 to 1,200.

    We have received donations from the North and West Sides, of made up clothing.

    The ladies of the South Side Sewing Society closed their needle-work sessions last week. On last Wednesday they had a general meeting at the Standard Hall, at which the secretary ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- May 28, 1880
    (No headline)

    Report of the Executive Board of the United Hebrew Relief Association.

    It is natural and proper, that the Relief Association should always be deeply interested in the financial prosperity of its friends and patrons. The improved condition of our affairs show that this has been a year of general prosperity. The revival of business, has produced a better state of things in the concerns of the Association. The recipients of your bounty have lessened in number, and those who remain are able to contribute something towards their own maintenance. That utter helplessness and destitution, to which our predecessors directed your attention in former years, no longer exists. We have, to some degree, compelled them to rely upon their own resources for a livelihood. This work is a step in the right direction. The truest benefactor of the poor, is he who teaches them to provide for themselves.

    2

    Collections.

    Notwithstanding this general prosperity, it must be said that our collections have been small and hard to secure. The number of general contributors have diminished and we fear will continue to diminish. The difficulties with which the Board has annually to contend to secure Collection Committees, and the positive reluctance with which these committees enter upon their work, demands some radical reform in view of our collection plans. The old plan of personal solicitation has outlived its usefulness. It may still be employed but should not be the chief reliance of the Board. It is due to these causes and others, that the great city of Chicago, with all its famed public spirit enterprise and liberality, does not contribute one-third as much charity as either of the great cities of the East. Surely it can be no pleasant reflection to know, that in proportion to its wealth and numbers, our city does not bestow upon its poor, as much as the humblest Jewish Relief Society in the land.

    3

    Self-Appointed Collection Committees.

    In the course of prosecuting their duties, our collection committees have had to contend with an evil which if suffered to continue will seriously cripple the usefulness of the Association. For several years past, many well-meaning persons - chiefly ladies - have, without the knowledge and approval of the Board, pursued the practice of collecting monies, for the benefit of applicants, who, almost invariably, have been found upon investigation, to be utterly unworthy, or have already received repeated assistance from the Association. These private collections are made so frequently, and bestowed so thoughtlessly, that the donors become discouraged, and, we may add, often disgusted. Merchants find it impossible to refuse these solicitations, because they are made, either by intimate friends, or by ladies of social prominence and influence. These ladies suffer themselves to be imposed upon, it would seem, by every impostor who happens to have the dramatic ability to tell a touching story of imaginary sufferings.

    4

    They are guided by sentiment and not by that common-sense and prudence so essential to the proper distribution of public charity. They exercise no discretion, and as a consequence, their charity hardly ever relieves the deserving poor, but is too often bestowed upon the professional beggar. The friends of the Association have been so frequently annoyed and harassed by these self-appointed committees, that when solicited by the members of the Board, they either contribute nothing or sums small in comparison with what they ought and would give had they not been annoyed so incessantly during the year.

    Annual Dues.

    The Board is collecting the dues of the various component societies - but more especially, some of the lodges - has found much difficulty in enforcing prompt payment. Many of the component societies have been delinquent for some years.

    Change of Annual Meeting.

    After several years of experience, the Board and its predecessors have found 5that to hold the annual meetings as now held in the Spring of the year, was an unfortunate change. Formerly they were held early in Autumn. When the annual meeting now adjourns, the Summer is upon us, and all interest cease in both public and private charities. There is an utter stagnation until the frosts of Winter remind us that the poor are again in want. Your collections are made in Autumn. All activity begins in that season. It is then the annual meeting should be held.

    Statistics of the Year's Work.

    During the year we have assisted 161 resident families aggregating 833 persons. Of these, about 32 were new applicants. 15 families were, upon their own request, sent to other cities. 21 families left the city without our assistance. The Association maintains as regular pensioners, 22 widows, and 19 women who have been abandoned and left destitute, by their husbands. 27 persons were sent to the hospital. During the year 10 adults and 12 children died and were buried by the Association. There were 35 applications 6for relief rejected - the applicants, upon investigation, having been found unworthy, or for other reasons not entitled to relief. We have expended $200 in medicines and medical aid and consumed about 211 tons of coal.

    Resume.

    During the year the Association with its branches has done some good work.

    We have paid out in money obtained:

    By collections $5,000.00
    From other sources 1,000.00
    In purchasing coal 850.00
    By the Ladies Sewing Societies Money and goods aggregating more than 2,500.00
    Making a grand total of 9,350.00
    There is now in the hands of the treasurer, a balance of 1,927.88
    7

    This money will be barely sufficient to meet our wants for the period of about six months, which must intervene before we receive any money from future collections.

    Report of the Executive Board of the United Hebrew Relief Association. It is natural and proper, that the Relief Association should always be deeply interested in the financial prosperity of ...

    Jewish
    II D 1
  • Jewish Advance -- November 05, 1880
    (No headline)

    The Corner Stone.

    (Speech by) Mr. M. M. Gerstley, in behalf of the Board of the U. H. R. A.

    The first Hebrew Relief Society in this city was called into existence in a strange and most peculiar manner. It was in 1854. The number of our coreligionists in this city at that time was about 3,000. Everybody endeavored to improve his condition as best he might but it was natural that in this struggle for success, some would fail and be forced to yield to the inevitable. It was then whispered that some worthy family amongst us was in need, even in the want of the necessities of life, but they could not be approached in any way to accept assistance. They would rather hide their misery. It was soon concluded what to do. Certain parties went to a neighboring grocery, bought flour, and provisions, directed them to the party mentioned, with the injunction not to tell who sent them. But the party finding it was to be accepted as a donation, or as charity, refused 2to receive them and had them returned. It was then contemplated that in order to spare the delicacy of feeling of parties in need, by being approached through the assistance of individuals, the object might be better accomplished through the formation of a charitable society.

    A society, "the first Hebrew Relief Society" of this city, with scarcely a score of members at the outset was then formed. It was soon ascertained, however, that the scanty means of the society were absorbed by applicants, especially by new-comers, consequently one or more societies for the same designs were formed. While these various institutions endeavored to do all the good, which was to be done within their limited spheres of action, there seemed still to exist a certain incongruity, a want of concerted action, between these societies; for it was clearly demonstrated that while under such a disorganized system, all the necessary care and attention were bestowed upon some parties, others equally as worthy were almost, it not entirely, neglected.

    3

    There was to be a remedy. Several meetings were held, and in order to bring about better results the various component societies, about ten in number, formed themselves into one general institution under the name and style of the United Hebrew Relief Association, in 1858.

    There seemed to be at that time but one, probably two hospitals in this city, that of the Sisters of Mercy, and the St. Luke's Hospital. When the constitution of the U. H. R. Association was formed, two members, engrafted in it a provision, to wit: "It is the ultimate design of this association to build a hospital."

    Time passed. The U. H. R. A. infused new life, and produced a greater concert of action amongst the whole community. Notwithstanding the generous contribution and continuous good will shown by our community for the well being of the association, still the people were not satisfied. They asked, 4they clamored for the erection of the long promised hospital. And finally, in 1865, the spirit of our community was aroused, and at a public mass-meeting held at the old Concordia Club Hall, in the then known Lombard Block, sufficient means were subscribed to enable the executive board to buy a lot and build a hospital on N. La Salle St., near Schiller, at an expense of $23,000. At the laying of the cornerstone, in 1866, the late Hon. J. B. Rice, then mayor of the city, proclaimed to the public that though this hospital was to be built and maintained exclusively by the Jewish community of Chicago, he was, nevertheless, authorized to say that its doors would always be opened "to the sick and suffering of all parties, without asking, or investigating, as to their creed, religion, or profession." In this connection we feel authorized to state here again that the same general and unbiased rule will be strictly adhered to in the future (re the Michael Reese Hospital).

    It is natural that the regulation and conducting of an institution of this kind, without any previous practice or knowledge of its workings, would be 5attended with considerable trouble and difficulty. Still the institution was managed properly and without interruption. On the whole it proved a success, with encouraging prospects for the future. While in this most prosperous condition, the fire of 1871 put a stop to our ambition. The hospital was destroyed. During all this period (since the fire) the work of the association was pursued with the usual vigor and energy, but the people keenly felt the want, yet had not sufficient means to rebuild the hospital, when, as it seems, in proper time the Messrs. Henry and Joseph Frank, who had the charge as trustees of a charitable fund bequeathed to their disposition by the late Michael Reese, Esq., of California, generously proposed to turn over $30,000 of said fund to the U. H. R. Association toward the rebuilding of their hospital, provided it be named now and henceforth the "Michael Reese Hospital." No less generous were Mrs. Henrietta Rosenfeld and Jacob Rosenberg, Esq., who were in possession of some special funds. They donated $50,000 of said funds to be reserved as a sinking fund, the interest of which to be applied toward the maintenance of the hospital.

    6

    Finally, we take occasion to remark that the hospital, with the ground on which it is built, is and will remain the property of the U. H. R. Association, and will be worked and managed by the executive board of the Association. The respective parties who so generously assisted and endowed it with such practical means, claim no further interests, no more individual preference, save that of its name, in order to perpetuate the memory of their generous and esteemed kinsman.

    The Corner Stone. (Speech by) Mr. M. M. Gerstley, in behalf of the Board of the U. H. R. A. The first Hebrew Relief Society in this city was called ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3