The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Occident -- April 29, 1887
    Madison Street Theater (Opposite McVickers)

    Mr. J. Adler of London, has the honor to announce that a company has been found by the name of the Hebrew National Dramatic and Operatic Stock Company, for the purpose of establishing a Jewish Theater Company in the City of Chicago.

    Sunday, May 1, and Friday, May 6, 1887, will be performed The Merry Gentlemen, a Comic Opera in three acts and six tablezux......

    Sunday, May 8, will be produced for the third time, The False High Priest, or The Innocent Victim, a tragedy in five acts with songs, by Dr. Ben Zevi (Odv)

    Mr. J. Adler of London, has the honor to announce that a company has been found by the name of the Hebrew National Dramatic and Operatic Stock Company, for the ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1
  • The Occident -- May 27, 1887
    Madison Street Theater (Opposite McVickers)

    Hebrew National Dramatic and Opera Company from London, will continue to give performances under the direction of Mrs. Senis Lipzin, who in Russia and England as well as in America (Chicago), has made herself beloved known.

    Sunday, May 29, 1887, The Fanatic or, The Two Cune Lemels, (Ne'er-Do-Wells) at Twelfth Street Turner Hall......;

    Monday, May 30, 1887, Shulamis, or the Daughter of Jerusalem

    Hebrew National Dramatic and Opera Company from London, will continue to give performances under the direction of Mrs. Senis Lipzin, who in Russia and England as well as in America ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- May 08, 1891
    [Music Works ]

    Email Liebling's "Kensignton Waltzes" have just been published by Oliver Ditson & Co. This is the composition which received favorable mention in the New York Herald music contest last year.

    "Butterflies," an operetta by the Chicago composer, Carl Koelling, was produced for the first time on any stage at the Carl Schultze Theater in Hamburg, April 11. The work met with immediate success, the Hamburg critics praising both music and libretto in high terms. The plot deals with both fairyland and earth, and the music is said to possess a melodic beauty, a life and sparkle worthy of a Johann Strauss.

    Email Liebling's "Kensignton Waltzes" have just been published by Oliver Ditson & Co. This is the composition which received favorable mention in the New York Herald music contest last year. ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 b, II A 3 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- June 24, 1893
    (No headline)

    It is pleasant news to announce the opening at the Standard Theater, of a season of opera and drama by Adler's New European Dramatic and Burlesque Co. In the troupe are the well-known Fritz Berend, Emil Berla, Jos. Greven and Aldoph Alfreds. The performances are given in the German-Jewish jargon.

    It is pleasant news to announce the opening at the Standard Theater, of a season of opera and drama by Adler's New European Dramatic and Burlesque Co. In the troupe ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1, II A 3 d 2
  • Reform Advocate -- August 26, 1899
    (No headline)

    On Sunday evening, September 3rd, Mr. Jacob Litt will produce at the McVicker's Theater a new and powerful play from the pen of Edwin Arden. The title of the play is "Zorah," and the subject, the persecution of the Jews in Russia.

    On Sunday evening, September 3rd, Mr. Jacob Litt will produce at the McVicker's Theater a new and powerful play from the pen of Edwin Arden. The title of the play ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Reform Advocate -- March 24, 1900
    (No headline)

    Mr. Glickman has engaged as a member of his company, the talented Mrs. Bertha Tanzman who is well-known in Jewish theatrical circles. She is an actress and prima-donna of unusual merit and will be a strong addition to the stock company on Saturday and Sunday nights. Jacob Gordon's "Brudie Lurie" will be given in which Mrs. Tanzman makes her first appearance.

    Mr. Glickman has engaged as a member of his company, the talented Mrs. Bertha Tanzman who is well-known in Jewish theatrical circles. She is an actress and prima-donna of unusual ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- May 10, 1900
    War in the Jewish Quarter The Director of the Jewish Theater Causes a Riot

    A violent riot occurred at the Jewish Theater, Jefferson and O'Brien Streets, yesterday. More than one thousand Jews of the neighborhood participated in the riot, and the director of the theater, Mr. Ellis Glickman, was arrested.

    Mr. Joseph Philipson, a department store owner, who has a store in the theater building, had been trying for some time to gain control of the part of the building occupied by the theater for an extension to his store, and his attempts in this direction were the cause of the riot. The lease of Mr. Glickman--who had been in possession of the theater for two years, where he had been giving plays in Yiddish--had expired on May 1, and Mr. Philipson claimed that he had signed a lease for the theater with the owner of the building, Mr. M. Nathan. Mr. Glickman declared that he had a verbal contract with Mr. Nathan for two more years and refused to vacate.

    2

    Mr. Philipson put a large sign outside the theater offering for sale all the fixtures of the place. This enraged Mr. Glickman, who immediately made plans for revenge. In the windows of a saloon located in the same building, Mr. Glickman exhibited a mass of old shoes and ragged clothes, with the announcement that the department store was holding a great sale. In order to bring a crowd together, he hired a band to play the liveliest tunes.

    Soon a crowd of more than a thousand dwellers of the Jewish quarter had gathered, everybody having his or her own opinion as to whether Mr. Philipson or Mr. Glickman was right. Suddenly a group of those who were siding with Mr. Glickman began to storm the entrances to the store while the adherents of Philipson broke into the theater, and for a while it looked as if the riot might assume serious proportions. The Maxwell Street Police Station was called, and a patrol wagon came up with a dozen officers under the command of Sergeant Harding. The officers attempted to break their way through toward the door of the theater, but the crowd resisted. The policemen pulled cut their clubs, 3and Sergeant Harding asked the Canalport Avenue Police Station to send more men.

    When this second group of officers arrived the riot was at its height. The Jews had started fighting each other, women taking part as fully as did the men. When the noise had reached its highest peak, Mr. Glickman and his group of actors appeared, all of them dressed in theatrical costumes. This was the signal for increased rioting, and the actors were at last compelled to withdraw. After a while the policemen made the band stop playing, and little by little the crowd was dispersed, but Mr. Glickman was arrested, charged with disorderly conduct.

    Mr. Glickman was released by Judge Dooley. He has entered suit against Mr. Philipson who caused his arrest, and is demanding $25,000 for false arrest.

    A violent riot occurred at the Jewish Theater, Jefferson and O'Brien Streets, yesterday. More than one thousand Jews of the neighborhood participated in the riot, and the director of the ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1, II A 2, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- June 11, 1906
    (No headline)

    "The Crazed One." (Dramatic Review).

    Drama in four acts by Jacob Gorden. Produced by Grand Theater Company at Academy of Music.

    "The Crazed One" is a play whose content and tendencies are even far more actuated than in any of Gorden's works for the stage. "The Crazed One" is not a play wherein action thunders across the stage and thereby detracts appreciativeness from the audience. "The Crazed One" is a play which causes the audience to forget its day to day affairs and completely absorb itself in the production.

    Is the purpose of life to better the well-being of man or is it a needless and tiresome process, void of a goal? The architectural structure of the play has many draw-backs; it is not arranged in accordance with rules of modern drama, and as such would not be accepted as an artistic work worthy 2of inclusion in the Jewish theater repertoire. Lacking a good many things it does, however, have its share of Jewish sweetness, witty remarks and humor.

    The following is the story of the play:

    Melech Gerber is a rich business man of Soroko, Russia, who cares not a damn about the rest of the world so long as he gets his in the way of profits. He deals in cow-hides, making leather, selling and swindling whoever crosses his path. He loans money at abortive interest rates, and even causes arrests of fellow Jews on false accusations just so his business be safe from harm. Gerber has two children, Harry and Ben Zion. The first is an ignoramous, unable to even sign his name, but adept at making money and therefore finds favor in the eyes of his father. The second son is educated, but branded as "The Crazed One" for studying science and the philosophy of the Rambom(Mai-monides). He admonishes his father for his dealings and is caused to flee from his father's home and go live with his uncle, Israel Jacob. Ben Zion invents a remarkable machine, but it is destroyed by his enemies whom he has 3exposed in his writings. Eventually he commits suicide saying, "This world and its false people are not for me, I have nothing to live for among them."

    Everything considered, the audience enjoyed the play immensely.

    J. Leibner.

    "The Crazed One." (Dramatic Review). Drama in four acts by Jacob Gorden. Produced by Grand Theater Company at Academy of Music. "The Crazed One" is a play whose content and ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- January 03, 1907
    (No headline)

    Morris Rosenfeld Theater Benefit, Big Success.

    One of the most successful theater benefits took place last evening, at the International Theater, where Mr. Glickman and his troupe of actors, played the Jewish "King Lear." The theater was packed with a highly intelligent audience.

    Mr. B. Hurwitz, Mr. A. Heller, Mr. Titus, Mr. Edelman, and others of the Arrangement Committee thanked the public for responding to this benefit, as it was for the worthy cause of raising funds for the assistance of a sick Jewish poet. Mr. Glickman reports a net profit of $600.

    A number of compliments were paid Mr. Glickman by the company of actors, for the way Mr. Glickman handled the affair, bringing it to such a successful conclusion. There was a letter with many thanks from Mr. Heller, expressing 2his appreciation for the interest Mr. Rosenfeld, and the Chicago Jewish public have taken in his present condition. He also espressed his great hope that he will soon sing again for his lonely exiled people.

    Morris Rosenfeld Theater Benefit, Big Success. One of the most successful theater benefits took place last evening, at the International Theater, where Mr. Glickman and his troupe of actors, played ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1, II D 10, II B 1 e
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 13, 1907
    (No headline)

    Next Monday night will be "Shelter Home Night" in Chicago. The International Theater has been rented for a theatrical production, proceeds going to the Shelter Home.

    Chicago Jewry can best show their appreciation to the Home by coming to the show and help swell the proceeds.

    Next Monday night will be "Shelter Home Night" in Chicago. The International Theater has been rented for a theatrical production, proceeds going to the Shelter Home. Chicago Jewry can best ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 d 1, II D 6