The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- April 07, 1877
    Henry Greenebaum

    A Tribune reporter yesterday morning called upon Mr. Henry Greenebaum at his bank on Fifth Avenue to get from him an explanation of the apparent deficiency shown in the expert's report, made from the books of the West Park Commission, and published in yesterday's Tribune.

    Said the reporter: "I want you Mr. Greenebaum, to give me a brief explanation of the reports published in this morning's Tribune."

    "My dear sir," responded the gentleman, "I am glad you came; but, really, there is nothing to explain, or even worth noticing. However, in justice to myself, I will say that my accounts are correct in every particular."

    A Tribune reporter yesterday morning called upon Mr. Henry Greenebaum at his bank on Fifth Avenue to get from him an explanation of the apparent deficiency shown in the expert's ...

    Jewish
    IV, I F 6
  • Record-Herald -- December 06, 1905
    Bible in School? No

    Strong arguments against the use of the Bible in the public schools, and for the ousting of corrupt politicians, were advanced by Mrs. Henry Solomon at the opening session of the triennial national convention of the Council of Jewish Women in Sinai Temple last evening.

    An informal reception to delegates and friends occupied the afternoon. The council will hold sessions for a week, with delegates from every city of importance in the United States and hundreds of members of the Chicago circle in attendance.

    Mrs. Solomon, who organized the council nearly thirty years ago, and who has been its president continuously, delivered the principal address of last evening.

    Task For Mothers

    "Again and again the plea is made to place the Bible in our public schools, but there is no place for it," she said. "We are still too near Bible idolatry to secure teachers who will do justice to this great literature. It is better in 2the hands of the mothers or Sabbath schools.

    "We must root our professional destroyers and the dens they infest. If our bad politicians could only undergo a political "Yom Kippur," in sackcloth and ashes, they would exclaim, 'We have grievously sinned.' It is a disheartening field for us. Private charities need state oversight. Aside from a few good charities hundreds are gathering funds spuriously. Look at Chicago free dispensaries as a sample."

    Greeted By Chicagoan

    Dr. Emil G. Hirsch pronounced the invocation and Miss Julia J. Felsenthal, president of the Chicago circle, welcomed the visitors. Harry Hart, president of Sinai congregation, lauded the women of Israel.

    In the annual report of the corresponding secretary Miss Sadie American of New York was told the national growth of the council. "The firm standing of the council may be adduced from the fact that five sections own buildings and one other conducts an 3institution," she reported.

    Mrs. Josephine Lazarus of New York will read a paper on religion this evening. Other speakers will be Mrs. C. Misch of Providence, Mrs. J. Andrews of Boston, and Mrs. S. M. Blumauer of Portland, Oregon.

    The Chicago Women's Club will receive the delegates Monday afternoon. The original afternoon programme will be given that evening.

    Strong arguments against the use of the Bible in the public schools, and for the ousting of corrupt politicians, were advanced by Mrs. Henry Solomon at the opening session of ...

    Jewish
    III B 4, I C, I F 6, I H
  • Record-Herald -- August 16, 1908
    (Sunday Edition) Rabbis Aiding Healy Members of Jewish Congregations Advised to Help Investigators

    Rabbis of Jewish Synagogues in the Nineth and Nineteenth wards are coming to the aid of the election board, in its efforts to unearth the wholesale frauds committed at the primaries August 8. Their appeals to members of their congregations to answer fully and truthfully the queries of the investigators now in the district, are expected to overcome the terrorism to which Jews of the district have been subjected. During the first days of the investigators' work in the ward, it was found impossible to get admissions from many Jews, who feared the retaliation of the political bosses of the wards.

    Orthodox Jews, who were known not to have approached the polls, although their names had been voted, refused to sign affidavits to that effect, or to make statements that would aid the investigators. The Daily Jewish Courier also has taken up the battle for the exposure of the frauds, and has urged the subscribers to do their part in punishing those guilty of them.

    2

    Affidavits now have been procured from many residents of the wards whose names were voted. The names of men who had approached them prior to the primaries, and ascertained that they did not intend to vote, also are in possession of Attorney F. D. Ayers of the election board.

    The investigation of the two wards promises to be an extended one, that will necessitate the attendance of seven-eights of the primary day officials, and many of the political leaders of the wards in the County Court.

    It is known that the judges and clerks of election were familiar with the identity of scores of men whose names were voted. The other flagrant violations of the primary law, which have been collected by officials of the Taft and Deneen ward clubs, also will be gone into by the election board attorney.

    Rabbis of Jewish Synagogues in the Nineth and Nineteenth wards are coming to the aid of the election board, in its efforts to unearth the wholesale frauds committed at the ...

    Jewish
    I F 6
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 15, 1908
    A. J. Harris Says That He Is Being Persecuted. in a Written Statement to the Daily Jewish Courier, Mr. Harris Declares That He Is Being Persecuted and He Is Innocent of All Charges Brought against Him. Big Fish in the Net

    Mr. Abraham J. Harris, clerk of the criminal court, who was indicted Friday evening by a special Grand Jury, on a charge of violating the primary election law, has declared that he is a victim of political maneuvers against him. A month ago an intrigue was begun to bring suit against him in order to defeat him politically. In a signed statement to the Daily Courier, Mr. Harris states the following:

    Through the facilities of the Daily Jewish Courier, I am bringing to the attention of the Chicago Jewish public, and particularly to those who supported me in my political career, that the indictments brought against me are merely a political trick, in order to discredit me and ruin my career. I am not shocked by these indictments, for most of the politicians have, before this, attempted to instill fear into me.

    2

    During the primaries I have done all within the law, in order to obtain votes for my friends - for the candidates I thought would work for the welfare of our population. I have committed nothing unlawful during the primaries.

    I sincerely hope that through these facts, which I hope to bring before the court, I will prove my innocence and will change the opinion of the Jewish public in my favor.

    A. J. Harris.

    Mr. Harris was indicted on eight points, four for bearing false witness and four for aiding in obtaining illegal votes. The charge of bearing false witness is for signing affidavits in order to enable some people who were not registered to vote at the last primaries. When the Grand Jury brought the indictments Friday evening, into the court of Judge Freeman, Mr. Harris asked the Jury to wait for the arrival of persons who will bail him. Mr. Max and David Weber, the owner of the Columbia Theater, have paid $11,000 bail. Mr. Clarence Darrow and Attorneys Adler and Lederer will defend Mr. Harris.

    Mr. Abraham J. Harris, clerk of the criminal court, who was indicted Friday evening by a special Grand Jury, on a charge of violating the primary election law, has declared ...

    Jewish
    I F 6
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 06, 1910
    (No headline)

    Representatives of 40 different religious groups, founded a Citizen's Congress, the purpose of which is to introduce religious principles in Chicago politics.

    The first meeting was held in the First Methodist church, where 46 religious groups and civic clubs and even a Jewish Temple were Represented. The Jews were represented by Rabbi Emil Hirsch and Dr. Joseph Stolz. Just what the activities of this group will be is not yet clear. A committee of fifteen, including the two mentioned above, was appointed to work out a workable constitution. The purpose of the Organization will be to clean out city politics.

    Mr. Edward Skinner, the project's most enthusiastic backer stated that the "Citizens Congress" was to be entirely non-partisan in character, and unbiased to religious affiliations.

    It is hoped that through the activities of this group, the courts will be forced to judge a criminal by the crime committed and not by the size of his bank-roll.

    Representatives of 40 different religious groups, founded a Citizen's Congress, the purpose of which is to introduce religious principles in Chicago politics. The first meeting was held in the First ...

    Jewish
    II E 3, I F 6, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 17, 1914
    Want to Do City of Chicago a Favor By Dr. A. Lebenson

    More than two hundred men and women want to do the city of Chicago a great favor by discarding their own business to become overseers of the city. Everyone of these men and women, if you should question him or her, will tell you that he or she is a candidate for alderman, not because he or she is in need of the job, but because the city needs his or her services and consequently, as good patriots, they must sacrifice themselves for the good of all.

    We know that Chicago could stand a great deal of improvement. Chicago is naturally endowed with many beautiful assets, and to keep it in good order competent men are required who are capable of being good officials. Unfortunately the city doesn't always succeed in having these competent men. Regardless of how the circumstances may be, the result is that the personnel of our city Politicans is not altogether what it should be. The 2excuse given for this is that the city has many expenses because it does not get enough work from its employees.

    It is a fact that Chicago is not clean enough physically and morally. We have too much dirt and filth on the streets in the different districts of the city; it is said that life and property are precarious in Chicago; that the city does not direct enough attention to protecting the health of its citizens; that it does not offer ample protection against fire, against thieves and burglars; that it is hazardous for a young person, especially a young lady, to walk unescorted outdoors; that the water is unbearable; that the prices of utilities are much too high; that transportation is so poor that it pays better to walk any distance; and so the city is being continuously criticized.

    It stands to reason that guilty of all these things are the politicians whose duties are to attend to the city affairs. These affairs are neglected 3because the politicians are either incompetent to act in their capacities or it may be of advantage to them to have things run as they are. To the citizens it makes little difference whether the aldermen are incompetent or grafters. They know that things are not in order, and they seek men who should be both competent and honest.

    However, in time of nomination and election of city officers, there appears in the race an army of more than two hundred men and women about most of whom nothing is known, They come to the citizens recommended by themselves, honoring themselves with great and outstanding titles. And on election day the average citizen stands confused. All candidates look alike to him. The "Campaign literature" which he receives daily only tell him of the good qualifications of the candidates, and it seems to him that everyone of these patriotic citizens, who forsake their business, and some go as far as forsaking their own families because they are simply sacrificing themselves for the good of the city, is certainly the most suited candidates. It is only hard for him to prevail upon himself to do one thing. He is permitted to 4vote for only one person and here are so many good people. His heart begins to ache when he must strike out many good names.

    But his pain, caused by striking out the others, becomes still worse each day after election. He discovers that, instead of selecting the best, he had as usual selected the worst. He arrives at the above conclusion because he sees that his alderman does nothing to mend the defects underlying the city, that he doesn't even intend to introduce order in the most decrepit corners of his ward. And he thinks, i.e., this innocent citizen, that if he only had used common sense and voted for his opponent, it would have been much better.

    Therefore, it so happens that at the next election, two years later, he votes for the other candidate. But when this other candidate is elected to office, the innocent citizen discovers that he made a more deproved exchange. He, then, gives up, thinking that there is not one righteous one. He condemns the 5whole order, adopted by America, of running the governments of the city, state, and nation.

    The citizens, however, forget one thine, viz., that the order is not to be blamed, but they are. If an average businessman is to hire a common clerk, he wants some recommendations. He will not rely upon the clerk's braggadocio. He will find out whether the clerk has any experience in that particular type of work. The businessman will be bent upon having assurance for the honesty and decency of the applicant. Thus is the conduct of every businessman when hiring the most insignificant worker. Now the question of hiring a manager to act in official capacity appears. Then the matter is gone through slowly. Everything about this manager's past is thoroughly investigated. An accurate account of his abilities is sought. His general knowledge of business is not so much questioned as is his specific knowledge of the sort of business he is to be engaged for, and even then, when everything is to the satisfaction of the businessman, he first 6 begins to probe his prospective manager. Only then, when he shows his practical abilities when being probed, will the businessman draw up a contract for his services for a period of two years.

    The very same businessman makes a contract for two years with an alderman, not even knowing his name. He relies entirely upon the virtues of any candidate as described in campaign literature or newspaper articles. He makes up his mind that he will vote for John because John would occasionally greet him in the morning. He elected Tom because the latter sent him a personal letter in which he strongly praises himself.

    The citizen, if he should be earnest, can not say that it is impossible for him to find out the qualifications of a candidate when he is in a race with more than 200 people. The fact is that more than 200 candidates are running in 35 wards on four different tickets, and let us say, for instance, that the Democratic citizens of a certain ward would sincerely like to have an alderman who should be devoted to his office and city, they would 7 find it easy to nominate such a person with only a little effort.

    The truth of the matter is that the leaders of a ward are very much like its citizens. If a candidate praises himself skyhigh, then the citizens of that ward, where such an alderman is elected, when a sudden wave of reformism overtakes them, will shout reforms, but will do nothing about inaugurating these reforms. They will not give time, money and energy to see that their ward be represented by a capable man. To carry out these things there is nobody home, because they are as sincere in their reforms as is their alderman in his election promise.

    The moral of this is that the more than two hundred candidates who want to sacrifice themselves for the good of all, will only be such "righteous men" so long as all will be like them. When the citizen will be what an alderman should be, then such sacrifices will not be accepted. There is a remedy for having good aldermen and that is by having good citizens.

    More than two hundred men and women want to do the city of Chicago a great favor by discarding their own business to become overseers of the city. Everyone of ...

    Jewish
    I F 6
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 06, 1914
    Sabath Responds to Accusations Hurled at Him

    The United Committee of representatives of the Board of Education and of the City Council, which is investigating the alleged irregularities in the purchase of sites for the School Board, received yesterday a letter from Congressman Adolph J. Sabath, who offers an explanation on those deals in which certain Chicago newspapers implicated his name.

    In a preface, as it were, to his letter, the Congressman states that in spite of the article, "Sabath will explain the school entanglement," published in the Daily News of Feb. 20, he received no invitation to appear before the committee even though he had especially come from Washington for this purpose.

    Mr. Sabath states further that he has been in the real estate business since 1889, and that despite the many real estate deals that have passed through his hands in the course of these many years, his only real estate transaction 2with the Board of Education was the sale of four lots ten years ago. Barring this deal, he has had no business dealings with the Board, neither as a seller nor as a broker.

    "This alone," says Mr. Sabath, "is sufficient to contradict any statement that I was personally interested in selling to the School Board real estate at fraudulent high prices, especially when such statements are based upon the alleged statements of a man who is now dead. And the man who made this charge was a person not only earmarked as a liar by a jury investigation, but also indicted for prejury.

    In connection with the deal made between Weisscopf and Ball and the Board of Education, on account of which his name was given publicity in the newspapers the Congressman made the following statement: "After Weisscopf and Ball had bought some lots on Lawndale Avenue, the School Board, without referring to me personally, began to negotiate with them with a view to purchasing the lots. The proprietors fixed the price at $100 per foot for 3the center ground [of the lots], and $125 per foot for the front. The price was very reasonable, which can be seen by the fact that the School Board paid Mr. Cage for the adjourning lot $10 and $15 per foot more than what Weisscopf and Ball received. Upon closing the deal, the Weisscopfs (who are business partners of my brother) and Mr. Ball (who is my brother's brother-in-law), naturally, engaged me as the attorney to handle the legal end of this transaction. This was taken care of, in part, by the clerks in my office. Mr. Hoffman, a young lawyer of my firm, was intrusted with the collection of monies for the County Treasurer's Office. There was a mortage on this property. This, as well as other necessary expenses, had to be paid. I had then advanced my money, for which I was later reimbursed by them upon the acknowledgement of a treasurer's check. I was unformed to cash it and deduct whatever was due me, Such things are customery between lawyers and clients."

    Mr. Sabath also says that a similar ridiculous charge was made against him, before, only that in this earlier charge he appeared as trying to make profits in school lots for people who are his personal and political foes.

    4

    After making it clear that the deal of Weisscopf and Ball was the only one in which he had any personal relations, the Congressman concluded thus:

    "The fact is that after reducing all taxes and other various expenses in connection with this transaction, Weisscopf and Ball made a comparatively small profit. The prices of real estate in that district, due to the car line on 16th Street and the huge construction enterprises there, have mounted incredibly in the past few years, and I am positive that the School Board can not procure any lots now in that district at the low price it bought from my clients. In order to prove the sincerity of my convictions in regard to the value of this property, I will, at any time in the course of one year, buy back the property on Lawndale Avenue from the School Board. But I will pay $90 per foot, which will give the School Board a profit of $2,750 or nearly 10% of the sum it paid.

    The United Committee of representatives of the Board of Education and of the City Council, which is investigating the alleged irregularities in the purchase of sites for the School Board, ...

    Jewish
    I F 5, I F 6, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 09, 1914
    The Vote Swindle Trial (Editorial)

    The Jury could not reach a verdict in the third trial of the election fraud, and the suit against the accused must, therefore, be continued. As we know, two persons were found guilty in the first trial, and the jury acquitted five people in the second trial.

    These decisions, rendered by the jury, can probably afford a pretext to those who are against investigating the election fraud and against convicting the swindlers by claiming that the prosecution has no ample grounds on which to build the charges. But viewing the matter from an impartial standpoint, we arrive at the conclusion that it is only but right that action against the accused be continued with all the expedience and vigor that the city can possibly command. That irregularities 2had been carried on in the counting and balancing of votes was shown in each trial. There is no doubt that patriots have exaggerated somewhat in reporting the number of votes for their favorite candidates. This is a crime which must be uprooted, and the city, through its authorities, should apply all efforts to put an end to this form of crime. It is certainly difficult to single out the one person responsible for this crime. That is why the jury renders a decision of not guilty, or can not reach a verdict. But the principal thing is not whether or not the accused are sentenced; the main thing is to eradicate the fraud. By bringing the guilty to justice, the big "patriotic" boosters of certain candidates will not be so willing to take a chance.

    Whoever can remember will recall that a few years ago there was going on, among the West Side Jewish "politicians," some sort of braggadocio. They would claim that they used to "count in" and "count out" certain candidates on election day.

    3

    The indictment in the Healey-Weiman controversy yielded good results, which lasted for a few years. Further action against the election fraud of 1912 will bring about cleaner and better elections in the future, even if none of the accused is sent to jail.

    The Jury could not reach a verdict in the third trial of the election fraud, and the suit against the accused must, therefore, be continued. As we know, two persons ...

    Jewish
    I F 6
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 15, 1914
    (Editorial)

    That the Chicago "World's Greatest Newspaper," The Chicago Tribune, deemed it necessary, for political reasons, to pretend to believe in the confessions of a knavish fellow, whom an impartial jury refused to believe even in an instance which could leave no doubt, can be readily understood by all. The Tribune picked up this man's confession and created a sensation about the purchases on land transacted by the Board of Education.

    Everything is permissible in wartime and in politics. The Tribune has used the same weapons that other politicians use in their struggle for political existence.

    It isn't new to hear from a political rostrum how one politician "reveals" things about his opponent which have never existed. Truth is evaded at a political festival. Accusations are framed and evidence is fabricated in a political war.

    It is said that even decent politicians are not so clean. But, in the first 2 place, there is very little decency among politicians. Second, politicians measure decency with a different rule from what ordinary people do, and whatever appears indecent to the average layman is very decent to a politician.

    The Chicago Tribune, whose ambition is to publish the World's greatest newspaper, is also meddling with politics. And this time it is on the other side of the fence. The Tribune, as we all know, is Republican, reactionary Republican, except in the last campaign when ex-President Taft refused to dance the political tango in accordance with the tune it [The Tribune] played. The Tribune was then forced to oppose him and line up with Theodore Roosevelt, thus becoming progressive until after the presidential election. After the election, not knowing who would gain the upper hand in the Republican party, the Tribune became impartial, i.e., half Republican and half progressive. But the Tribune is at all times a bitter opponent of the Democratic Party.

    Incidentally, the State of Illinois, Cook County, and the city of Chicago 3are now governed by Democrats. And still worse, Chicago the city in which the "World's Greatest Newspaper" should really be influential, where it should be adhered to if it had any power, is administered by a fraction of the Democratic party, against whom the Tribune is more embittered than any other political opponent.

    Those who are somewhat posted in Chicago politics, know that there exists an old feud between the Tribune and the Harrison family, and from every indication, it still will have to do some tall fighting against the Harrison administration in Chicago. It stands to reason that the Tribune's opposition to the Harrison family could not prevent the old Carter H. Harrison from being elected mayor for five terms. This proves that the Tribune is probably the "World's Greatest Newspaper," but when it comes to a political battle the broad masses can interpret the political-dyed news and the made-to-order editorials, which aren't taken seriously.

    A newspaper can only have an effect on the masses, especially on election day, if it is honest, impartial, and not one-sided. The large masses are not so 4blind as mudslingers would have us believe. Even if the Tribune is the "World's Greatest Newspaper" it is rather little in proportion to Chicago's population, especially when it assumes the role of a moral preacher venting chastisement and reprimanding the Democratic party, the Democratic city, county, and state administration. It is the advice of a friend that sinks deeply into the heart; the enemy's advice goes into one ear and out through the other.

    It is therefore very natural for the Tribune to devote its front page and print in large letters the admissions of a scamp whom an impartial jury declined to believe and whose testimony concerned a dead man unable to disprove it.

    But, from the Tribune's standpoint, as long as the admission could cast a shadow on the city administration, it was deserving of front-page space; as long as the admission could cast some suspicion on the people who are responsible for the success of the Democratic party, the Tribune took to it as flies take to molasses. Upon investigation, however, Chicago's noted businessmen proved that everything written by the Tribune was a lie, which should have occupied some corner on the 13th page in fine print. Partiality in politics leads to the adoption of the 5Jesuitical maxim that "the end justifies the means." The Tribune is no exception to this.

    But if we can understand the tactics of the "World's Greatest Newspaper," we cannot conceive of the traditions of our so-called great Jews. We cannot agree with the Hirschs, the Hirschbergs, the Schoenfarbers, and the Levys who follow the Tribune's footsteps when they act nonsensically in politics.

    [At this point the writer reproaches the rabbis for taking a hand in politics and for agreeing with the attitude the Tribune has taken in this case. The writer concluded by saying that "this exposes the pettiness of our so-called great men."]

    That the Chicago "World's Greatest Newspaper," The Chicago Tribune, deemed it necessary, for political reasons, to pretend to believe in the confessions of a knavish fellow, whom an impartial jury ...

    Jewish
    I F 6, I D 1 a, III C, I C
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- March 15, 1914
    The Unfinished Hospital (Editorial)

    In the coming election, the Board of Cook County Commissioners will implore the local citizens to confirm a loan of $4,000,000, through the issuance of bonds, in order to complete the construction of the new Cook County Hospital.

    Four years ago the local citizen granted the issuance of $3,000,000 worth of bonds for the purpose of constructing a new county hospital. At that time we were certain this $3,000,000 would be sufficient to construct a hospital equipped with all the modern improvements. But the Cook County officials know nothing of the art of economizing or sparing when it is a matter of the public's money. And why should they economize or spare? They were not elected to their offices for the sake of the public's interests. Those having power to nominate and appoint their candidate, do so not because this or that candidate is a true friend of the people. In politics 2the whole of society benefits by mutual aid, and when the one who is elected has personal obligations to individuals, he must fulfill them on society's account, if he is a politically honest man.

    No one accuses the Cook County Commissioners of closing such contracts as have been closed by the convicted Tammany Hall politicians of New York State. But still less will anyone dare to praise those who have wasted the vast sum of $3,000,000 by claiming that they have acted entirely virtuous upon closing contracts and handing out jobs; that they have done everything for the good of all, manifesting administrative and financial competency.

    The dead are not removed from the grave. Nor does public money, which has gone to waste, resuscitate; not even in the minds of those who believe in most anything. The question now is not what has been achieved in the past four years with the $3,000,000, but whether we should grant another $4,000,000 to complete the hospital?

    The answer to the question can not be two-sided. The present Commissioners of Cook County have proved to be inept to administer such a huge sum of 3public money. The citizens of Chicago are not assured that these commissioners will not waste the new sum of $4,000,000. They (the Board of Cook County Commissioners) are like simpletons or children who lose everything given to them. They, therefore, can not be entrusted with anything. Thus every earnest citizen should vote against the issuance of new bonds.

    The contention that the hospital must be completed would have substance if the Cook County Commissioners were elected for a few decades. But, as the case is, re-elections will be held this fall. Then the people will fully know that the newly elected need be entrusted with a sum of $4,000,000 to complete the County Hospital. The citizens will have to assume the responsibility of not electing simpletons or children for commissioners, but honest men who should be capable of directing public affairs.

    In the coming election, the Board of Cook County Commissioners will implore the local citizens to confirm a loan of $4,000,000, through the issuance of bonds, in order to complete ...

    Jewish
    I H, I F 6, I F 1, I E