The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • United Hebrew Charities -- December 26, 1890
    (U. H. C. Correspondence)

    Quotations from a letter sent to B. H. Hartogensis, Esq. Editor "Jewish Exponent", Baltimore, Md., by B. J. Werthsimer, Secretary in regard to the good work being done by the Labor Bureau of the U. H. C. -

    "I send you by today's mail reports for 88-89 and 89-90 in which I have marked matter referring to the Labor Bureau. Of course I am unable to state how many of the beneficiaries would have found employment without our aid but if you will note that 90% of the applicants last year were foreigners, it is but reasonable to conclude that few, if any, could have procured work without its assistance. And I may add that almost all of those for whom employment was secured would have become charges upon our relief society had no work been supplied them.

    The Superintendent of the bureau, Mr. Bartenstein, devotes all of his time to that work and receives a salary of $1800 a year. His office is connected with that of the Relief office so that the Supt. of Relief may turn over to him at once the applicants for whom the Bureau should care. In general we have found the Labor Bureau of great value in charitable work in uncovering frauds on 2the one hand and on the other in enabling many worthy persons to become self-sustaining. I earnestly hope that your efforts in establishing such a bureau in Baltimore may meet with success."

    Quotations from a letter sent to B. H. Hartogensis, Esq. Editor "Jewish Exponent", Baltimore, Md., by B. J. Werthsimer, Secretary in regard to the good work being done by the ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 8, I D 2 c
  • Reform Advocate -- November 07, 1891
    [Russian Relief]

    From the report of Superintendent A.R. Levy, on the relief work of the Executive Committee in Aid of the Russian Refugees.-

    "We have been able to secure employment for a good number of unskilled laborers and boys. However, our means do not suffice to meet the emergency. We are unable to find employment for all. There is but one solution to the problem - the refugees must be distributed throughout the country. The burden of this enforced and abnormal immigration is cast upon the few larger communities in the country and, our city is receiving more than its due share. It is to the country places, to the smaller cities, to the towns and villages, that we must look for the remedy. An earnest and urgent appeal must be made to our brethren in the country who will surely share with us the burden that ought to rest upon all Israelites alike. Let an appeal in the form of a letter be addressed to individual members in the smaller communities and the result will, no doubt, be very satisfactory."

    From the report of Superintendent A.R. Levy, on the relief work of the Executive Committee in Aid of the Russian Refugees.- "We have been able to secure employment for a ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II D 1, I D 2 c
  • Reform Advocate -- April 13, 1892
    [Concerning the Refugees]

    Those refugees who would not accept the work provided for them by the Relief Committee were asked to seek their quarters on Thursday. Those who were ejected collected about the building, and sought to effect an extrance by violence. The clamor became so great that the police were called on two occasions to clear the streets.

    All those that we were forced to eject have been with us between three and four weeks and they have made absolutely no move in spite of our appeals to them to help themselves. If those that we ejected show any disposition to accept employment or to help themselves we will be only too glad to give them all the assistance in our power.

    The disturbance occurred at the Relief Committee headquarters at 152 W. Twelfth Street.

    Those refugees who would not accept the work provided for them by the Relief Committee were asked to seek their quarters on Thursday. Those who were ejected collected about the ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 c, II D 1
  • The Occident -- October 27, 1893
    David Kallis

    Several weeks ago when it was hourly expected that trouble would be caused by the unemployed workmen of this city, who were crying pitifully for bread, and when no one seemed to heed their pleadings, David Kallis came to their assistance and saved thousands of men, women and children from starvation by providing a plan whereby 6,000 families were fed daily.

    Twenty-four years ago, David Kallis came to this city a poor boy, for twelve years he was a match peddler on the streets of our city. By industry, integrity and strict attention to business, he has made his way in life until he is now one of our most prosperous men.

    Too much cannot be said in the endorsement of such men as Mr. Kallis, and it would afford us greater pleasure, if instead of endorsing him for County Commissioner we were endorsing him for Mayor.

    Several weeks ago when it was hourly expected that trouble would be caused by the unemployed workmen of this city, who were crying pitifully for bread, and when no one ...

    Jewish
    IV, I F 5, I D 2 c
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 30, 1907
    Our Labor Bureaus Editorial

    When an immigrant gets his first job he has accomplished the first step in his reorientation to his new life. The second step is hurdled when he has learned those few necessary expressions and their meanings in English. The second step is much easier than the first. When he gets his job he has a livelihood and it is only a question of time as to the Americanization process that inevitably takes place. When, however, the immigrant has no employment, reorientation fails to take place and the immigrant gropes in the dark.

    Only when we realize this, can we understand the importance of the Labor Bureau which was created by the United Hebrew Charities and the Bnai Brith, to find employment for unemployed immigrants. The Labor Bureau now accomplishes a great deal. However, the bureau could accomplish a great deal more if our own business people and manufacturers would be more aware of their duties to their people. We feel that if an employer in need of 2workers would apply to our Labor Bureau, the benefits of the bureau could be extended to a great many more people. We could easily dispense with their charity if they would employ our unemployed but capable immigrants. Work instead of charity should be our slogan, Jewish employers! Use our Labor Bureau when you need workers. Do your duty to yourself and your people.

    When an immigrant gets his first job he has accomplished the first step in his reorientation to his new life. The second step is hurdled when he has learned those ...

    Jewish
    III G, I C, II D 1, I D 2 c
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 01, 1913
    The New Immigration Bill

    Today or tomorrow there will be introduced a new immigration bill. Congressman Sabath stated, in a speech before the representatives of foreign language newspapers of Chicago, published in yesterday's Courier, that the bill has many possibilities of becoming law. The Jewish congressman, from Chicago, and his few aids are in the minority. The bill, it seems, will have a large majority in Congress.

    The friends of the immigrant are few. Those against him are influenced by organized labor. Mr. Gompers, leader of the American worker, himself an immigrant Jew, at the last convention of the American Federation of Labor, raised the question of admittance of aliens to the United States, accusing the friends of the immigrant of being foes of labor in need of cheap labor and, therefore, in favor of the open door policy.

    The friends of immigration have shown more than once the fallacy of this assumption. Recently, Mr. Isadore Isaac, in a book full of facts presented 2the assertions of Mr. Gompers. He shows that the immigrant is not responsible for unemployment, nor does he lessen the standard of life of the American worker. On the contrary, in districts of fewer immigrants, the earnings are less and unemployment greater. Earnings and unemployment are determined by what La Salle called "The Iron rules of Modern Industry."

    The fewer the workers an employer has, the fewer his business deals with other employers, and the worse the resulting condition for all. The coming of more workers creates a demand for more business enterprises and new fields of labor. Unemployment is not due to too many immigrants but to present day industry, which produces more goods than people can buy, thus having to lay off workers from time to time.

    The enemies of immigration, among whom are found large groups of aliens who accepted this attitude after getting their first jobs, know that on their side stands organized labor. This gives them twice the courage to fight for an immigration bill, aiming not to increase the amount of fortunate ones who were permitted to enter into this promised land.

    3

    The defenders of the immigrant must have a strong love for the immigrant and an unusual courage to defend him, at a time when organized labor, in which there are a great many foreigners, accuse them of being enemies of the workers working in the interest of the employers.

    Those who have the interests of the immigrant at heart, who feel his plight, who remember their own experiences on Ellis Island, when they landed there believing that here was the "tree of life," who have relatives and friends in other countries, who wish that the poor and oppressed of the old world find a haven in this great land with room for whole nations and races, all these friends of the immigrant should now follow this advice and flood their congressmen with a mountain of protests against their unfriendly stand towards immigration.

    Congressmen from every district should be showered with letters requesting them to defeat this bill. If these protests succeed in lessening the numbers of supporters of this bill in Congress, then our purpose will be accomplished. President Wilson, according to Sabath's opinion, will not sanction this bill unless forced to do it as a result of its passage by a 4large majority of votes. This large majority can be avoided if energetic protests are sent by naturalized citizens and their friends.

    Today or tomorrow there will be introduced a new immigration bill. Congressman Sabath stated, in a speech before the representatives of foreign language newspapers of Chicago, published in yesterday's Courier, ...

    Jewish
    III G, I D 2 a 2, I D 2 c, I F 4, IV, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 11, 1913
    The Bread Line

    In a time when some Jews argue about this or that one as a qualified leader in the community, other Jews, shivering from cold, wait in the public hunger line, at the employment bureau, and in the bread lines.

    There is nothing new in unemployment to excite Jewish civic workers or to find them unprepared. The Lechem Leravim (food kitchen) was not established merely for the "all year-round" poor; and the Hachnosses Urcheem (Strangers home) may keep open doors even for those who are no longer itinerants.

    Jewish civic workers, even those not connected with charity, at sight of our present bread line, should get their radical plans of curtailing future economic woes, since this cannot still the hunger of today or warm the present cold.

    Cold and hunger are non-partisan, non-confessional, and cosmopolitan. They have no regard for one's standards or position in life. To overcome these, we must employ a universal method whose usage to date has not been possible.

    2

    It is also impossible to do away entirely with unemployment in today's economic setup.

    Chicago Jews cannot provide for the entire world; they cannot even solve the problem of unemployment among Jews, even that of their own community, but what they can do is to enlighten and mitigate the sufferings of the workless by aiding them as much as they can.

    In a time when some Jews argue about this or that one as a qualified leader in the community, other Jews, shivering from cold, wait in the public hunger line, ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 c, II D 8, II D 10
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 03, 1914
    Workers Ghetto

    It is pitiful and heart-breaking to be unemployed and hungry. It is unpleasant to witness how women and children are exposed to hunger and cold. But to become comedians and appear on the stage is absurd from all points of view.

    Unemployment is found not only among Jews, but also among all nationalities. It affects the entire population of this city. Do you ever hear of such complaining among any part of the population other than by a few hundred unemployed Jewish workers? Has anyone even given a thought to the absurdity of demonstrating in the downtown section, thereby exposing himself to derision and mockery? No one has acted in this way, except our unemployed Jewish workers.

    Unemployment is a plague of the present social order. As long as such a social 2system exists, as long as classes dominate, there will be unemployment; hence complaints and demonstrations definitely cannot help create work for the unemployed.

    The only thing that remains to be done is to alleviate the sufferings of the unemployed. At present there are no radical methods. Neither the city, state, nor federal government can solve this social question unless they change the present system of production.

    If complaining does not help, why resort to it? To demand by force that Jewish philanthropists help more than they are, is utterly ridiculous. You can't dig into their pockets or transplant a new and sympathetic heart into their bodies.

    3

    It is understood that those who are to provide for the unemployed have been doing everything within their means, but they can do nothing if the public does not respond warmly. It is, perhaps, a crime, but you can do no more than either gnash your teeth or execrate those who have brought on such a condition.

    In accordance with a resolution passed at its last meeting, the United Hebrew Trades has declined to do anything for the unemployed. We would probably have nothing to say about this decision as the United Hebrew Trades did not do anything, anyhow. It gathered no funds, and it did not permit men to aid the committee, which did do something (except Mr. Shapiro, the secretary). However, in spite of everything, we think it is a crime on the part of the United Hebrew Trades to have erased this question from the agenda. It is true that it can 4do very little at present, but it could have done something for the future. The United Hebrew Trades should have brought this up before the unions which were represented there, supplementing it as a trade union question.

    Since a union protects the interests of the workers, why should it not protect them during unemployment? Unemployment affects workers just as much as a strike does. Therefore, unions should have a crisis fund just as they have a strike fund, Naturally, this would involve higher dues, but if the workers knew that this would make it easier for them in times of unemployment, they would gladly pay such contributions. If the unions would do this, a great deal of humiliation endured by union men, who must demand assistance from others could be done away with. It is a burning question. May the unions consider this matter.

    5

    Mr. Sam Cohen, temporary secretary of the Independent Painter and Paper Hangers' Union, submitted the following news about their union:

    With the beginning of the season the Independent Union is becoming active in its organizational work. For a long time it has held this as its task. This can be seen by many facts. First, they have sent Mr. Shapiro to New York to see if it is possible to join the International. Secondly, a resolution was passed to distribute 50,000 circulars appealing to the public not to hire any paper hanger or painter who does not have a union card.

    Also these important questions were transacted at the last meeting, namely; the raising of wages by next season, the hiring of a permanent business agent and organizer, and the increasing of the admission fee from one to three dollars.

    6

    These points were decided in order to enable them to continue with the work of agitation.

    To what extent the organization has grown can be seen by the fact that the hall was not large enough to accommodate the members who attended the meeting. Therefore, it was resolved, that due to its rapid growth, the organization be divided into locals. A beginning was already made by the establishment of Local No. 1, Independent Paper Hangers' Union.

    It is pitiful and heart-breaking to be unemployed and hungry. It is unpleasant to witness how women and children are exposed to hunger and cold. But to become comedians and ...

    Jewish
    I H, I D 2 a 2, I D 1 a, I D 2 c, II D 10, I C, I E
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 06, 1914
    The Unemployed Are Being Provided For

    The unemployed will be provided for until conditions improve, and the heads of families will secure work from the Jewish Aid Society on Morgan and Maxwell Streets. This decision was reached yesterday at a conference of the United Hebrew Trades.

    Present at this conference were Kiss Tousing, superintendent of the Jewish Aid Society and of the Associated Jewish Charities; Mrs. J.B. Malkes, chairman of the Committee to Aid Unemployed Workers; Mrs. Samuel L. Rosenblatt, vice-chairman of the Committee; Mr. Harry A. Lipsky, of the Jewish Courier; and Mr. I. Shapiro, secretary of the United Hebrew Trades.

    The names of families of unemployed workers were examined, and it was found that many of them belonged to people of high social standing, people who never 2before had applied for charity; others were tradesmen, to whom relief was to be extended for a short time. They considered a way whereby they could get relief without being humiliated. After considerable deliberation, it was decided that Miss Tousing should attend to all cases recommended by the Committee to Aid Unemployed Workers.

    The Jewish Aid Society will shelter these families and provide them with rent, groceries, coal, utilities, and other necessities.

    The committee that fills orders for meals and sleeping quarters had a very busy day. The wide-spread rumor that the committee was dishing out meals to everybody attracted a new element that besieged the office of the United Hebrew Trades. Among the new comers were many to whom the committee thought it would be a crime to give meals that were intended for those who are really in need.

    For some time the committee had to suffer the inroads of the professional meal-ticket parasite, who, on being denied aid, threatened the committee with disorder 3and physical injury. The committee, consisting of Mrs. Malkes, Morris Seskind, and I. Shapiro, found itself up against it. Being morally responsible for the unemployed workers, and not being permitted to distribute meals to this new element, Mr. Shapiro spoke to them, saying that their action would only bring chaos and cause relief to be stopped for all. He urged them not to listen to professional agitators and let the committee carry on its work.

    Mr. Shapiro's talk cooled off the crowd and things returned to normal.

    Yesterday the Courier received $922.46 as a relief contribution.

    The unemployed will be provided for until conditions improve, and the heads of families will secure work from the Jewish Aid Society on Morgan and Maxwell Streets. This decision was ...

    Jewish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, II D 1
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- February 16, 1914
    New Organization for the Unemployed

    A group of prominent businessmen of Chicago will meet today in the office of B. J. Rosenthal, in the North American Building to discuss ways of raising funds for a new movement to aid the unemployed of Chicago. This group of businessmen is considering various [types of] relief for the unemployed, such as warehouses of food and other necessary commodities, a public wood and coal yard where the unemployed can find work, housework for wives of unemployed men, employment bureaus, etc. Also a plan is under discussion whereby unemployed skilled workers would be hired to teach unskilled workers a trade.

    The basic principle of this new organization is that relief is not to be given as charity, but as "loans". The recipients will have to pledge, on their word of honor, that they will pay for everything they receive. Accurate accounts will be kept of the things the unemployed receive. No one will receive aid from the organization without a recommendation from the Associated 2Jewish Charities, the United Charities, or some other authorized charitable institution.

    A group of prominent businessmen of Chicago will meet today in the office of B. J. Rosenthal, in the North American Building to discuss ways of raising funds for a ...

    Jewish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, IV