The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Reform Advocate -- March 07, 1903
    (No headline)

    Dr. Hirsch acted as arbitrator, and his findings settled the differences between the Firemen's Union and the Building Manager's Association. In a second arbitration, Dr. Hirsch settled the dispute between the Stationary Engineer's Union and the Building Manager's Association.

    The Doctor is now sitting with Judge Sears and Prentiss as a Board of Arbitration convened to consider the differences between the Chicago City Railway Co. and its employees.

    Dr. Hirsch acted as arbitrator, and his findings settled the differences between the Firemen's Union and the Building Manager's Association. In a second arbitration, Dr. Hirsch settled the dispute between ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 1, I D 2 a 2, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 25, 1907
    Jewish Furrier Union of Chicago

    The Jewish Furrier Union of Chicago is arranging a concert and entertainment, proceeds to go to the New York Furrier workers who have been waging a strike for the past five weeks.

    The finest entertainers in Chicago will participate. Don't forget. Metropolitan Hall, Jefferson and O'Brien St., Saturday evening, October 26. Admission fifteen cents to all.

    The Jewish Furrier Union of Chicago is arranging a concert and entertainment, proceeds to go to the New York Furrier workers who have been waging a strike for the past ...

    Jewish
    II A 3 b, I D 2 a 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 03, 1907
    Seen and Heard (Local Column) United Jewish Gewerkschaften (Trades)

    The United Jewish Gewerkschaften is celebrating its first anniversary and has truly earned the right to make a fuse over it. Its accomplishments thus far have been notable and its plans for the immediate future have all the earmarks of complete success.

    In spite of their accomplishments, it is tragic to see that in such a large city with a large Jewish working population, more workers have not sought organization under the Gewerkschaften Banner.

    It is highly desirable that unorganized workers be present at the United Gewerschaften Celebration and see for themselves the value of thorough and effective organization.

    Speaking of the Labor Movement we understand that the United Jewish Gewerschaften are planning to organize an International Tailors Union. We wish them success in their very worth-while endeavors in the interests of the most exploited trade in the world.

    The United Jewish Gewerkschaften is celebrating its first anniversary and has truly earned the right to make a fuse over it. Its accomplishments thus far have been notable and its ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 27, 1908
    The Workers' Ghetto

    In the workers' world, all is quiet and peaceful. It is the calm and quiet of people who undertake to do more than their strength permits. The organized workers realize that they have undertaken a tremendous task, when the American Federation of Labor openly declared itself much in favor of the Democratic Party. The unorganized workers know, that the defeat of organized labor will also affect them. The workers know, through bitter experience, that they are last to benefit from a victory, and first to suffer in a defeat, resulting from War between Capital and Labor. The uncertainty as to the outcome of this war, throws workers into inactivity--they are merely waiting.

    The very important event of this week which the workers should pause and consider, is the voting at the Cleveland of a three-cent carfare.

    2

    Every one knows about the struggle between Tom Johnson and the Surface Car Companies, which he has carried on for the last seven years.

    The fight is against the reduction of the price of fares, from five cents to three cents. Mr. Johnson was leading this war in the name of the people and the workers. They were merely informed, that the car companies rob them of two cents each day of the week, when they ride the Street cars. The workers have enlisted in this fight with Mr. Johnson and he has won. As soon as the war was over, and it was attempted to convert theory into practice, it was discovered that the system is not workable. The workers demanded more privileges. They were victorious and they wanted to reap the benefits.

    This resulted in strikes, bloodshed and so forth. The three-cent fare was not profitable. It was necessary to reduce the number of cars and stop issuing transfers. It was very uncomfortable for those, who had to use the cars.

    3

    The workers have decided that something has to be done about it. They decided that they would rather pay five cents fare, in order to be comfortable, and to enable their brothers to get higher wages.

    The moral of this is that, some theories are fine so long as they remain as such, but the minute they are put into practice they are a flat failure. Also that it is unwise to depend upon professional schemers. The workers are not so dumb as toallow themselves to be led by any Autocrat or Demogogue.

    The American workers are Progressive but not radical. They know that Rome was not built in a day. They believe in Evolution.....not Revolution. They are aware of the extent of their strength, and can admit that they erred.

    In the workers' world, all is quiet and peaceful. It is the calm and quiet of people who undertake to do more than their strength permits. The organized workers realize ...

    Jewish
    I H, I D 2 a 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- November 04, 1908
    The Workers' Ghetto

    A letter to the editor. Warm words when cold and gloom are manifest. Moral is sought. For when a woman and children starve, what there is to do to help?? The editor of the Workers' Ghetto has received the following communication which speaks for itself:

    Chicago, Illinois

    November 1, 1908.

    Dear Editor of the Jewish Courier:

    Your are requested by our union, The Progressive Cigar Maker's Union, to remember us with a few "warm words," Tuesday, November 3, to point out to our workers, the cigar makers the necessity of organization. Their wages are so pitifully low, that seventy five per cent of the cigar makers earn only six or seven dollars a week. On these low wages, a married man is obliged to support his family. To speak of the morale and hygienic conditions, the picture is more sad.

    2

    Our union expects cigar workers, not yet organized, all bunch makers and rollers at our meeting, Tuesday evening, November 3, at the Shapiro Hall, corner 12th and Waller Street. R. Yukelson.

    We are printing this letter, although, it is too late, as the date of the meeting of the cigar makers is now past. We are fulfilling half of Mr. Yukelson's request. We are not in a position to fulfill the other half.

    His request is that we write some warm words. Only a thought of seventy five percent of workers of a certain trade are earning as little as six and seven dollars a week, and have to support their families on this miserable pittance makes one's body cold. The writer of this article also has a family and he imagines what a tragedy it would be were he to earn only six or seven dollars a week.

    Each time he sees a child of his, well nourished and clothed, with an opportunity for a good education and happy, he pictures a cigar maker's child, starving or under fed, naked and unhappy. Each time I see my wife, who is busy as a bee, trying to make our children more satisfied, I think of a wife of a cigar maker, who is also busy, but what with? She is busy talking to her children, in order to cause them to forget their terrible hunger.

    3

    Personally, I am afraid to look at myself in the mirror, for that compels me to think of the faces of cigar makers, pale from the effect of tobacco and starvation wages. And Mr. Yukelson requests me to write warm words!

    Warm words, when my body is shaking from anger! Be a wizard and write such a thing! Mr. Yukelson, perhaps, can write it, for he is, as a worm in a jar of horse-radish, he is in the "trade," to live with a family on six or seven dollars a week. But, I brother, brother......it makes me shiver to think of this situation. It seems to me that no warmer words than six and seven dollars a week need to be mentioned. This alone should be so hot and burning that it will ignite the heart of every worker, it must ignite with a fire which would spread and convert into ashes, the hearts of the, so called, philanthropic bosses, who pay their workers such miserably low wages.

    And the tragedy is still greater, when the naive Mr. Yukelson says: "The morale and hygienic conditions." Mr. Yukelson is seeking hygiene where hunger and misery are reigning supreme, where six dollars a week must maintain a family, it would be a matter of laughter if it were not as tragic as it is!

    4

    One can about picture a family living on six and seven dollars, what rent they can pay, what rooms they can live in, what furniture they can have and what food they can eat? Mr. Yukelson speaks about morale and hygienic conditions, when the thing to speak about is bread. One can hardly expect a worker to come to meetings, when after a day's labor he finds no food in his home, and has the task of trying to make his children fall asleep, so that they will not realize how much they are starving!

    No friend Yukelson, if you want to help your co-workers you must appeal to the organized workers, who have struggled and have won. Those who already have sufficient bread, they must help you, who are hungry and weak and unable to help themselves! We will at all times be glad to open the columns of the Workers' Ghetto for you the minute you give us a signal. And if there is still blood running in Jewish hearts, I say Jewish-workers or no workers, we will warm it up, so that it will give courage to the workers, to at least win for themselves, food, shelter and clothes.

    A letter to the editor. Warm words when cold and gloom are manifest. Moral is sought. For when a woman and children starve, what there is to do to help?? ...

    Jewish
    I H, I D 2 a 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 15, 1908
    The Worker's Ghetto

    The United Jewish Trades of Chicago are calling a conference. To call a conference, in labor parlance, is as calling a councilium of physicians for a very ill person. It is quite appropriate that those who are interested in the person ailing to see to it that the specialists who are called in understand the sickness. In a councilium as this, personalities play no role, neither do personal opinions. The most important matter is to know and to thoroughly understand the case.

    The United Hebrew Trades of Chicago is ill, dreadfully ill. Their meetings are not attended; their work is not fruitful. During the time of their existence they have organized all sorts of International Worker's Organizations. Each time a union was organized, there was plenty of noise. They made an alarm, boasted and bluffed that all these International Unions are really doing wonders. But now they are dead and buried...without as much as a monument on the graves. The delegates who call themselves "The United Hebrew Trades," represent no one but themselves and their interests. They come there when they have personal problems, which they hope may be solved to their benefit. There is hardly a union which sends a proper representative of the trades, whose job is to represent 2any body of workers in any branch. There is no delegate in the Trades who would make an honest effort to study and know the proper methods of organizing Jewish Trade Unions. There is little wonder why The United Jewish Trades has had no success, hence they are calling a conference. There is no doubt that Chicago workers are in need of the United Hebrew Trades. If there is any hope of organizing Jewish Trade Unions and maintaining then, it will be accomplished only by a united effort of all Jewish Trade Unions.

    A Jewish Bakers' Union, a Jewish Carpenters' Union, etc., cannot exist as a Jewish Union unless it has the sympathy and support of the Jews. Only then can they exist as a specific Jewish Union, when they are conducted in accordance with the Jewish spirit, Jewish customs and manners, or else they might as well join the general Trade Union Movement. The fact that Jewish workers of Chicago prefer being in Jewish Unions, reveals that they have individual interests, individual problems and individual reasons why there should be separate Jewish Unions.

    A Jewish Trade Union should do two things. As a Trade Union they should be a part of a general Federation; as a Jewish Union they should be in a Jewish 3organization. Therefore, when a Jewish organization of this type is planned, it should be remembered that the organizers must be Trade Unionists. It is a very sad experience for our Jewish workers, when their unions are founded and built by persons who are not workers.

    We would like to say here that our intellectuals, who are usually radical and who deem it their mission to guide every worker's movement, always come as teachers or professors to every conference of workers. They take up a lot of time with scientific speeches. Being better speakers and debaters than the ordinary workers, they make motions, speak on the motions and pass the motions, regardless of whether or not the workers who are in these unions, and who are obliged to support them, like it or not. The ordinary worker, who can not make a speech and theoretically explain his needs, feels ashamed to express his practical opinion at meetings, he loses interest and stops coming to meetings. When, however, the time for action arrives, instead of speeches, there is no one to act.

    We fully recognize the moral support which our radical element can give to a workers' union, when agitation is needed, when good speakers and writers are needed. Should they come to our rescue at such time, it would be greatly appreciated.

    4

    We regret, however, that our radicals are so narrow-minded, that a Poale Zion will not move when a Socialist speaks at a union; a Socialist will condemn the workers' movement should a Democrat participate, and collectively they would actually sabotage a union, should an Anarchist attempt to devote his time and effort in building up a Trade Union Movement.

    Our advice to those who are interested in the United Jewish Trades is to see to it that the conference consists only of workers from the various trades - not radicals or intellectuals. That a delegate from a Bakers' Union should be a baker; from a Barbers' Union, a barber, etc. Let all workers come to an open meeting, let them express their opinions in their own words, let them come to the conclusion that a united body of workers must consist of workers and no other people. Let them lead their own struggle and they will win!

    If radicals and intellectuals like to assist the unions, let them organize themselves into "Emergency Bodies" and be ready to help, when it is needed, to agitate for the Union Label, to demand articles with the Union Label, etc. This should be the work of the intellectuals, and then Jewish Unions will surely exist and flourish in Chicago.

    The United Jewish Trades of Chicago are calling a conference. To call a conference, in labor parlance, is as calling a councilium of physicians for a very ill person. It ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2, I E
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 29, 1908
    (No headline)

    Chicago, Illinois.

    December 27, 1908 (?)

    The second meeting of the United Jewish Industries Conference was held Sunday, December 27, at 486 Halsted Street. From various organizations the following delegates were present:

    The Bakers' Union, local 237, Moliver Branch, Workmen's Circle, Wolyn Branch, Workmen's Circle. A roll call of delegates was taken. On the order of the day the following was taken up: "How to create a sentiment among the Jewish workers for organization?"

    2

    After a lengthy debate, which continued approximately for 2 hours, during which the delegates did not arrive at any conclusion, a committee was elected to pass resolutions on the following questions:

    1. The purpose of the Conference.

    2. What position should the United Jewish Industries take?

    A committee of seven (7) was also elected in order to pass the resolutions and present them before the next meeting.

    B. Sosin, secretary.

    Chicago, Illinois. December 27, 1908 (?) The second meeting of the United Jewish Industries Conference was held Sunday, December 27, at 486 Halsted Street. From various organizations the following delegates ...

    Jewish
    I E, I D 2 a 2
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 26, 1909
    The Workers Ghetto

    A fight has been going on for sometime to have 10 hour work day for women. This is one of many cause for which the organized workers have been fighting with their employers for sometime past. This is one of the basic conflicts that is now going on between capital and labor. The workers, on the one side, who furnish all the work possible in order that we may exist, the workers, who furnish all the work possible in order that we may exist, the workers, who are compelled to sell their hands, strength, and health for but a small piece of bread. They who are forced to send their small children to work in factories, their poor weak women to their task of work, they are ones now carry on the fight to better their conditions.

    The fight is for higher wages, shorter working hours, better sanitary factories, and also for better conditions in general to lighten the better conditions in general to lighten the burden of the workers so that they may live happily with these objects in view, the workers are organizing themselves into all kinds of 2different trade unions, to fight with all their might and right for their interests as workers. Now, on the other side, one finds the employers, the owners of all kinds or different factories, who are becoming richer and more powerful day to day. The employer's existance and success is built from the profits they make from workers, for it is to their interest, that the workers produce more and pay as little as possible. In other words, the employer are resorting to all kinds of schemes to keep the workers down.

    The present fight is the 10 hour work day for women. All details of this fight already has been published in the Daily Jewish Courier, and we here repeat that this demand for a 10 hour work day for women is one of the most justified demands that has ever been made from any manufacturer.

    3

    The fight that started here in Chicago has developed into a fight to a finish for a 10 hour work day, which is agitated by the Federation of Labor and the Women's Trade Union League. This fight has been going on for years. The fight was mainly carried on by the Women's League, who constantly put up a stiff fight, single-handedly for a 10 hour work day. This league worked hard, and finally succeeded in organizing all women workers of all different trades into unions. They also carried out plans for forcing the Legislature of Illinois at Springfield to pass the laws for the betterment of the conditions of the laboring public.

    The Legislature passed the necessary laws governing labor and its laws provide a factory inspector, whose duties are to look after the welfare of the workers, and to see that all laws governing labor shall be enforced to the better.

    4

    The most important of all these laws as the enactment of the 10 hour a day law for women workers in factories. A factory inspector was immediately appointed and he has already made two arrests of manufacturers, who did not comply with the new labor laws. It is our opinion that all the workers in the Jewish Ghetto should stand fast to their convictions, by organizing into unions. For by doing so, they will always be ready to fight for their interests. Unions are the only hope for their future good treatment by the manufacturers, for after all the power is in the hands of labor, as the sympathy of the general public is with the workers.

    Soched Ben Harav

    A fight has been going on for sometime to have 10 hour work day for women. This is one of many cause for which the organized workers have been fighting ...

    Jewish
    I H, I D 2 a 2, I K
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- December 19, 1909
    A Jewish Actors Union in Chicago

    The Jewish Variety Actors Union was incorporated in the State of Illinois. At the head of this union, the following actors were elected: Samuel B. Grossman, Philip Angenblick, and Morris Singer.

    The Jewish Variety Actors Union was incorporated in the State of Illinois. At the head of this union, the following actors were elected: Samuel B. Grossman, Philip Angenblick, and Morris ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2, II A 3 d 1
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 03, 1910
    (No headline)

    The Carpenters Local No. 1, will meet in Cohen's Hall, 1338 South Jefferson Street. We are accepting new members for an initiation fee of $3.50. Meetings are held on the first and third Wednesday of each month, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening.

    The Carpenters Local No. 1, will meet in Cohen's Hall, 1338 South Jefferson Street. We are accepting new members for an initiation fee of $3.50. Meetings are held on the ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2