The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 03, 1879
    Free Sons of Israel

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to its poor and sick members, as well as the help to their widows and orphans, and the decent burials of the dead, give convincing proof of its humanitarian spirit. There are eight lodges of this Order in Chicago at present, and it was decided three years ago that the Order should have its own cemetery; as a consequence thereof, five and one-half acres of land were bought near Waldheim (Forest Home). Through an assessment of five dollars on each member, the first payments were made, a fence was erected, a caretaker's house was built, and trees were planted, etc.

    The administration in charge of the burial ground is called the Cemetery Association of the Free Sons [of Israel], and it consists of three delegates from each lodge. Thus far, only a few family burial plots have been sold and the Association, therefore, is confronted with large debts. [In order to remedy this situation] the Cemetery Association resolved to hold a fair 2at Uhlich's Hall, from March 2 to 9, in order to pay off the mortgage. The general public is requested to give generous support to this philanthropic endeavor, and, particularly, not to let the various committee members, who are entrusted with collections, go away empty-handed when they come seeking articles for the fair.

    The Esther Lodge, a ladies auxiliary club of the Order, has already shown active interest and obtained gratifying results, which will do much in making the fair an outstanding as well as a financial success.

    This old Order was founded in the East where it is well known, and a few years ago the Society organized a branch in Chicago, where the benevolence accorded to ...

    Jewish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 3, I D 1 b, II A 2, II D 1, II F
  • The Occident -- December 16, 1881
    (No headline)

    Over thirty of the Russian refugees that have come to Chicago have already applied to the Mayor of the city for licenses to peddle. If at the rate these men come here they are thus encouraged by a few of their countrymen who want them to peddle their wares and goods, old and secondhand, all our Chicago thoroughfares will be lined with Russo-Polish hucksters and peddlers.

    We suggest to the Russian refugee committee, No. 106 Randolph Street, to make it the imperative rule not to give a meal or lodging to those having purchased a license.....The refugees should not be allowed to cast odium upon Judaism in Chicago by thus early beginning and over-run our city with a peddlers horde; It would simply be a disgrace to us. To show how persistently these small rapacious traders urge their poor countrymen into the paths of low barter, nearly all in making application for license have signed their name in Hebrew.

    Over thirty of the Russian refugees that have come to Chicago have already applied to the Mayor of the city for licenses to peddle. If at the rate these men ...

    Jewish
    I C, III G, I D 1 b
  • Reform Advocate -- July 10, 1891
    [New Photography Gallery]

    Messrs. Stein and Roesch have fitted up one of the handsomest photograph galleries in this country at 1301 Michigan Ave. This firm has won medals to the value of $4,000, some of which are now on exhibition at Hyman, Berg and Co.

    Messrs. Stein and Roesch have fitted up one of the handsomest photograph galleries in this country at 1301 Michigan Ave. This firm has won medals to the value of $4,000, ...

    Jewish
    I D 1 b
  • Reform Advocate -- March 26, 1892
    [Russian Refugees to Be Aided]

    A large meeting of Jewish traveling men was held last Saturday at the Grand Pacific, to take steps in aid of the Russian refugees. It was held at the suggestion of the Russian Aid Society, who believe that such good could be accomplished by the formation of an advisory board of commercial travelers. S. Despress presided, and L. A. Kohn acted as secretary.

    A number of earnest addresses were made, showing the anxiety of those present, to aid in relieving the distress of the refugees by securing them employment. A committee of twenty was appointed to issue a call to all traveling men, for a general meeting to be held this Saturday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, at the Palmer House. The Hon. Simon Wolf, of Washington, it is expected, will address the meeting.

    A large meeting of Jewish traveling men was held last Saturday at the Grand Pacific, to take steps in aid of the Russian refugees. It was held at the suggestion ...

    Jewish
    I D 1 b, II D 1, II D 1
  • Reform Advocate -- April 16, 1892
    [Godfrey Snydacker Dead]

    Godfrey Snydacker died suddenly on Tuesday night of heart failure, at his residence, 2522 Michigan Ave. He was born 66 years ago in Westphalia, Germany, where he received an excellent education in the national schools. After graduating, he followed the profession of a teacher for a time and filled an important position in a leading German institute of learning.

    In 1853,he emigrated to New York, and after a residence there for a few months, he came to Chicago. For three years he was preacher of the Kehilath Anshai Moarab Congregation of the Men of the West, and also taught the day school in connection with the Congregation. When the Sinai Congregation was formed in 1858, Mr. Snydacker became a member, and, on several occasions, has been its presiding officer.

    He was one of the business pioneers of Chicago, having established a banking and real-estate business in this city as early as 1858. The firm's name 2was first known as Eisendrath and Co., and it was composed of Nathan Eisendrath, Conrad L. Niehoff, and Godfrey Snydacker. In 1861 his partners retired, and Mr. Snydacker and his brother, Moses Snydacker carried on the business under the firm's name of Snydacker and Co.

    He was a member of the Hebrew Relief Association for twenty-five years, and for many years was a member of the executive committee. Mr. Snydacker was also German Consul in Chicago for several years subsequent to 1858.

    Godfrey Snydacker died suddenly on Tuesday night of heart failure, at his residence, 2522 Michigan Ave. He was born 66 years ago in Westphalia, Germany, where he received an excellent ...

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 b
  • Reform Advocate -- October 08, 1892
    [Isaac Waixel Dead]

    Isaac Waixel died October 2nd, at the age of 62. He was one of the oldest and best known cattle-dealers at the stock yards, being one of the original promoters of the yards. He opened his business there in 1855. He was a member of Zion Congregation until within a few years, when he moved to the South Side.

    Isaac Waixel died October 2nd, at the age of 62. He was one of the oldest and best known cattle-dealers at the stock yards, being one of the original promoters ...

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 b
  • Reform Advocate -- January 14, 1893
    [Jeremias Schaaf Dead]

    Jeremias Schaaf died January 12. He was 68 years old and was one of the early settlers of Chicago. He was the first person to engage in the wholesale millinery trade in this city. Mr. Schaaf was born in Neustadt-on-the-Hart, Germany, and came to this country in 1851.

    Jeremias Schaaf died January 12. He was 68 years old and was one of the early settlers of Chicago. He was the first person to engage in the wholesale millinery ...

    Jewish
    IV, V A 1, I D 1 b
  • Chicago Record -- June 02, 1893
    (No headline)

    The unleavened bread of the feast of the Passover is the cause of a suit begun in the town. The Rev. L. Anixter, the Rev. Abraham Robinowitz, A. T. G. Lesser, Joseph Komisarsky, H. S. Album and T. Tiktin, rabbis of this city, are the complainants in the suit, which is brought against D. Jacobson and Son, the Canal street bakers, to compel them to pay a stipulated commission on the sale of unleavened bread sold during the Passover or Easter time.

    The complainants have filed with their bill a copy of a contract they entered into with the defendant, according to which they were to receive one cent on every pound of matzos or unleavened bread sold at Passover time.

    In return for this they were to inspect the mill where the wheat was ground, to examine the wheat before it was ground and to give the bakery where the bread was made the personal attention of one of the rabbis every day. They also contracted not to lend their name or assistance to any other baker of matzos.

    The unleavened bread of the feast of the Passover is the cause of a suit begun in the town. The Rev. L. Anixter, the Rev. Abraham Robinowitz, A. T. G. ...

    Jewish
    I B 4, I D 1 b
  • Reform Advocate -- September 09, 1893
    (No headline)

    Max M. Rothschild died on September 5th 1893, at his home, 2112 Prairie Ave. The deceased was born in Germany in 1849 and came to America when quite young. He came to Chicago from Davenport, Iowa, in 1871, where, with his three brothers, Abram M., Emmanuel, and Isaac, he had conducted an extensive clothing business. Later, Abram and Emmanuel came to Chicago and the three brothers entered the wholesale clothing line, the firm now doing business at 203 and 205 Monroe st. He was a member of the Congregation Kehilath Anshe Maariv. Mr. Rothschild was a man of much charity and was always generous to the poor.

    Max M. Rothschild died on September 5th 1893, at his home, 2112 Prairie Ave. The deceased was born in Germany in 1849 and came to America when quite young. He ...

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 b
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 20, 1906
    (No headline)

    Is the Jew a Good Customer?

    Very few of our business men realize just how great the purchasing power of the Jew in Chicago is. Many business men seem to ignore this purchasing power and others will tell you that the Jew is the most difficult customer to sell to in that he is always seeking bargains.

    Most business men do not understand Jewish trade or how to get it. Actually, the Jewish customer either in retail or wholesale business is the best customer in the world. Jews are known throughout as a people of business. Business is the life blood of the Jew. He seems to understand better than others the value of merchandise and what it can be sold for.

    Phillipson's two large stores in the center of the Chicago Jewish district, seem to prove these statements. Phillipson's stores draw ninety per cent of its business from Jews. Samuel Phillipson was the first merchant to appeal particularly to Jewish trade.

    2

    Jewish Merchants.

    Jews are the largest wholesale customers in the country. Aside from the many thousands of stores in large cities, there are still many more thousands of stores in small towns that are owned by Jews.

    To gain such a reputation, there was more than honesty and work needed. Price and quality of merchandise were determining factors.

    The Jews as a Retail Customer.

    The Jew buys a good deal for personal use. The Jew spends very little upon trivial things, but he therefore spends a good deal more upon food and clothing. Jews, generally buy from the better groceries in the market and are a bit more particular about the quality of clothing they purchase. They also believe in paying cash.

    3

    This sort of trade, it seems to us, is the best in the world.

    The secret of success in business is to understand the class of people with whom you are dealing, to know how to satisfy them and to do so.

    Is the Jew a Good Customer? Very few of our business men realize just how great the purchasing power of the Jew in Chicago is. Many business men seem to ...

    Jewish
    I C, I D 1 b