The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • The Occident -- July 21, 1882
    Some Plain Truths

    We must freely admit that we have not yet attained to that eminence which is true of other metropolises, on this Continent. It cannot be averred that they do not possess the wealth. On the contrary, we count now among us who are not only millionaires while a considerable number are financially well to do, and as a business class stand pre-eminently high. But the Israelites of Chicago lack influence, notwithstanding their social and political relations are as nil. There are several causes assigned for this anomalous condition. One or more Jewish wiseaires have in the earlier days of Chicago conceived the Utopian idea that races and religious sects have no business to exist on this American Continent. In other words, the Jewish type and character was to be transmuted into an American citizen in all spheres of life. However, much of this state of being is desirable, yet so long as there are other religious denominations neither the history, nor the Jewish people can be lost sight of; on the contrary we would stand out in bold relief, as may be evidenced in our everyday life.

    As Jews or Israelites, our Chicago representative men seldom confer with each other.

    2

    They are ever wanting as a body when a great public measure is to be fostered and encouraged. Another and the most potent reason is, that the most affluent Israelites of Chicago lacks that intelligence and education which might convince them of such public undertakings, whereby they might attain a renown for public spintedness, and to say nothing of their parsimonious disposition and money harding qualifications. There are however, among our middle class Israelites very many whose magnanimity appear like shining stars, if we compare the sums donated in behalf of the Russian Refugees with those of the Jewish millionaires of Chicago......It were about time that our Chicago Jews began to realize their insignificant. They should, of right become philanthropist and public benefactors. We have yet to record a single instance where one of our rich Jews has ever endowed a public institution to the amount of even one dollar.

    We must freely admit that we have not yet attained to that eminence which is true of other metropolises, on this Continent. It cannot be averred that they do not ...

    Jewish
    I H, I C, I D 1 a
  • Reform Advocate -- May 28, 1892
    [Joseph Frank Dead]

    Joseph Frank, one of the most widely known and respected business men of Chicago, died Thursday, after three days' sickness. Mr. Frank was born in Affhausen, Wurtemburg, June 30, 1838. He came to Chicago when about 14 years old. After the death of his father, the boy took charge of the family. Engaging in the Dry-goods business, he was successful and amassed a considerable fortune. The panic of 1857 left him bankrupt. He compromised with his creditors and in 1865 paid compound interest. Again in 1871 he met with disaster. The great fire of that year swept away his possessions. He then embarked in the cattle business and was successful from the start. After recovering part of his lost fortune, he went to all his former creditors, and, though not legally obligated, he paid them in full, with accrued interest, for every dollar, a fact in which he took great pride.

    Apart from his business life, Mr. Frank was eminent in all that contributes to make a good parent and citizen. He was charitable to the poor., and through 2his energies, to a large extent, is due the Michael Reese Hospital. He was a nephew of Michael Reese. Mr. Frank was a member of the Standard and Union League Clubs. Up to the time of his death, he was secretary and treasurer of the Ogalalla Cattle Company. During the recent trouble in Wyoming, he was in Cheyenne and gave to the press the most lucid account of the situation from the cattle growers' standpoint, that has, up to the present, been published.

    Joseph Frank, one of the most widely known and respected business men of Chicago, died Thursday, after three days' sickness. Mr. Frank was born in Affhausen, Wurtemburg, June 30, 1838. ...

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 a
  • Chicago Record -- June 05, 1893
    The Schaffner Failure (Editorial)

    The cause of the failure of Herman Schaffner, banker, is as yet only conjecturable. The examination of the books of the bank has not been completed, and even when fully made, may not reveal much more than the fact that the bank's available cash was not equal to the demand.

    Herman Schaffner was not so much a banker as he was a dealer in negotiable commercial paper. He gathered up in many ways and at varying profits the notes of people who had secured or who desired to secure certain discounts. These, he in person, took from bank to bank, disposing of some here and others there, until he had unloaded his holdings. These notes were not endorsed by him and they are not in any way involved in his failure. The character of Schaffner's business made him peculiarly vulnerable to the existing condition of the money market.

    Just now, and for sometimes past, banks have been curtailing their loans instead of increasing them. The condition among small depositors was 2panicky and the tendency was to demand the cash at the cashier's window.

    Having but little actual capital and probably loaded down with notes bought to be resold, he found himself caught without available funds. His depositors demanded cash and he had no cash to give them. Their cash had been turned into commercial paper for which there was no demand and no sale.

    The cause of the failure of Herman Schaffner, banker, is as yet only conjecturable. The examination of the books of the bank has not been completed, and even when fully ...

    Jewish
    I D 1 a, II A 2
  • Reform Advocate -- September 30, 1893
    [Barnard Steele Dead]

    Bernhard Steele died Sept. 27th, aged 68 years. The deceased was the head of the Steele, Wedeles Co., wholesale grocers, and had a high standing in commercial and social circles.

    Bernhard Steele died Sept. 27th, aged 68 years. The deceased was the head of the Steele, Wedeles Co., wholesale grocers, and had a high standing in commercial and social circles.

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 a
  • The Occident -- October 04, 1895
    A Great Mercantile House of Chicago

    With the rapid stride which Chicago is progressing in this fin de siecle, it was deemed essential to provide a want for everything that all classes of people require and that every article obtained shall be only the best. The A. M. Rothschild & Company, emporium, in this regard, is not behind the famous Bon Marche of Paris. It is but a short while, since this firm has placed a stock of merchandise, comprising everything in the line of fabric and manufactures, which has not its equal in the United States in their block of buildings recently remodeled by them on State and Van Buren Streets.

    With the rapid stride which Chicago is progressing in this fin de siecle, it was deemed essential to provide a want for everything that all classes of people require and ...

    Jewish
    II A 2, I D 1 a
  • Reform Advocate -- May 04, 1901
    (No headline)

    Isaac H. Horner is one of the sons of Henry Horner, and is identified with the grocery house of Henry Horner and Co. He was born in Chicago in 1855, and received his education in the public schools of the city, later attending college. He is a member of K. A. M., and is an ex-director of the Standard Club. Mr. Horner has taken considerable interest in public life and was Alderman of the 2nd Ward for four years.

    Isaac H. Horner is one of the sons of Henry Horner, and is identified with the grocery house of Henry Horner and Co. He was born in Chicago in 1855, ...

    Jewish
    IV, I D 1 a, I F 4, I F 5
  • Reform Advocate -- May 04, 1901
    (No headline)

    Henry Horner was born in Bohemia in 1819, and came to Chicago in 1847. He was the founder of the present wholesale grocery house of Henry Horner and Co., which is the oldest business of its kind in Chicago. He is a founder of K. A. M., and was one of its early presidents. Mr. Horner died in 1879.

    Henry Horner was born in Bohemia in 1819, and came to Chicago in 1847. He was the founder of the present wholesale grocery house of Henry Horner and Co., which ...

    Jewish
    IV, V A 1, I D 1 a, III C
  • Jewish Labor World -- August 01, 1908
    (No headline)

    An appeal from the United Hebrew Trades to the Jewish Workers of Chicago. We have gone through a year of suffering. The lamentations of the workers and their families still ring in our ears. There was great misery among the unorganized workers. These men began to understand that the trust magnates were responsible for their sufferings. They realized that under the present conditions they must organize themselves.

    In order to carry on the work which was started by the Jewish workers, it was necessary to organize a body that would centralize and establish a great and powerful army to spread the sentiment of class struggle. Such was the P. A. G. of Chicago.

    The United Hebrew Trades laid the foundation for the Jewish labor movement in Chicago. If you will read the statistics, you will discover how many organizations have been installed by this federation workers of Chicago, we must start a new movement in Chicago for next year. The shops now have a little more work. The sweat shop is taking on a greater form, and we must prepare with more power to free the workers.

    An appeal from the United Hebrew Trades to the Jewish Workers of Chicago. We have gone through a year of suffering. The lamentations of the workers and their families still ...

    Jewish
    I D 1 a
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- April 29, 1910
    (No headline)

    Labor Tactics Change. (Editorial).

    Labor tactics and labor organizations are at present undergoing revolutionary changes. This seems to be in accord with the general changes in the social and political life of America. Every observer can readily see these changes taking place. What are the changes labor organizations are undergoing and why do workers join trade unions? We believe that one word "fight" answers the whole question. Labor is preparing to fight and they are ready to fight their employers to get better conditions, better personnel management, and better pay. Through this new spirit the employers are already being forced to grant many concessions and improvements.

    This fight between Capital and Labor which is so often apparent in our own land, invoked the interest of an indirectly affected third party, the people. This third party expresses its interest and its dissatisfaction in various forms. It may be an open protest, it may be new laws, or it may be the successful or 2unsuccessful sponsoring of new laws. Capital, on seeing this sentiment of the third party, slowly but surely begins to make concessions, sometimes, before labor demands them.

    The manufacturers of Illinois now send representatives and lobbyists to Springfield to see to it that the legislature enacts proper workmen protection laws. The Harvester Company has already introduced new methods in labor management and personnel, although such innovations are as yet in the discussion stage in the legislature at Springfield. The Steel Trust, and many railroads are now raising wages and bettering working conditions in anticipation of worker's dissatisfaction with existing arrangements.

    Certain industries are planning a cooperative plan between workers and employers whereby employees receive a share in the division of profits. We could point out numerous cases where Capital is becoming social minded and is doing much to avoid conflict.

    3

    Naturally, we see in this only the beginning in new social development. There still exists much bitterness between Capital and Labor, but we feel that there must exist some bitterness in the development of a new social structure.

    Just what this new social structure will be, what conflicts may be had in its attainment, and how it might affect the Jew, is as yet speculative. However, we are sure to see new Trade Unions in America, with new demands and new battle lines, and moreover with new and varied labor tactics.

    Labor Tactics Change. (Editorial). Labor tactics and labor organizations are at present undergoing revolutionary changes. This seems to be in accord with the general changes in the social and political ...

    Jewish
    I D 2 a 2, I D 1 a
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 10, 1911
    (No headline)

    An unknown organization reports that Mr. Julius Rosenwald donated a half million dollars for Jewish farmers. This report seems to be misrepresented for Mr. Rosenwald emphatically denies it.

    When the well known Jewish millionaire and philanthropist Mr. Julius Rosenwald woke up this morning, he was informed that there is a company of Real Estate promoters who wish to relieve him of four hundred and fifty thousand dollars. A report was published by the City Press association in all English papers that a meeting was held in the Apollo Hall and it was decided that Mr. Rosenwald give four hundred and fifty thousand dollars to each group of 450 Jewish farmers to buy farms in the state of Oregon.

    Mr. Rosenwald was interviewed by a Courier reporter to whom he stated that this report was absolutely without foundation, he never had any such idea on his mind of having a Jewish Farmers Colony in Oregon.

    It is still a secret as to how or who circulated this falsehood.

    An unknown organization reports that Mr. Julius Rosenwald donated a half million dollars for Jewish farmers. This report seems to be misrepresented for Mr. Rosenwald emphatically denies it. When the ...

    Jewish
    I D 1 a, IV