The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Reform Advocate -- April 24, 1891
    [Growth of Jewish Charities]

    The Jewish charities of our city have undoubtedly during the past decade grown in a most gratifying manner. Our population has increased, our means for doing good have become larger, and the number of our charitable institutions has more than doubled in the last ten years. In 1880, we had the Hebrew Relief Society, with its auxiliaries, the sewing societies and the Jochanna Lodge and Deborah Verein. The treasury of the main society was then, as it is still now, never overflowing with surplus funds. The Jewish hospital had fallen a prey to our great fire.

    The prospects in 1880 for rebuilding and re-organizing the Hospital were flattering; late in the fall of that year the corner stone was laid. We had then, as now, our Orphan asylum in Cleveland, and institution which deserves to be classed among our own local charities, as it takes care of our orphans.

    2

    The Congregations were by no means large or well supported. With the exception of the Sinai Congregation, none had a house of worship of any pretentions whatever. The Sinai Congregation with its seventy members staggered under a heavy indebtedness.

    Things have changed during these ten years. The United Hebrew Charities, the successor of the Old Relief, is better supported, although in consideration of the needs, the sums collected are by no means as large as the work requires. The Young Men's Hebrew Charity Society, organized in '83, and now one of the most active channels through which collections for charitable purposes are made, supports in connection with the Charities, a labor bureau. The Hospital was dedicated in 1891, and during the ten years since elapsed, has worked itself into the admiring affection of Jew and non-Jew alike in our city. Today there is a unanimity of opinion that the Michael Reese Hospital is a model of its kind. The building has been repeatedly altered and enlarged. A children's ward was opened two years ago, and a school for nurse's training was added 3recently to the other departments. The operating room is perhaps the finest in the whole West, and its outfit the most complete.

    Who dreamed ten years ago of a Manual Training School? People had heard of a workingmen's school in New York, but even in their fondest anticipations would have refused to credit that it would be out-stripped sometime by a school founded by the Jews of Chicago, and for the Jews of Chicago, both in the point of number and the scope of its cirriculum.

    Under the able supervision of Prof. Bamberger and his corps of competent and devoted assistants, the school has grown to its present size of nine hundred pupils in day school, and large evening classes (supported by the B. B. Lodges and the Johanna Lodge) for the instruction of men and women.

    Now, scarcely half a year after the opening of the training school, we also have our Old People's Home. The generosity of outsiders has incited to action the benevolence of our own citizens, and we now find the original 4gift more than duplicated.

    Besides these donations and endowments for new charities, the orphan asylum has made its annual collection, and has received more than thirty thousand dollars as a contribution from Chicago for the erection of a new building.

    But there is one feature lacking in our charities, and it should be filled speedily. We have provided for the poor, for the sick, for the able-bodied in the search of work; we have made provisions for the orphans, not merely in Cleveland, but also in a smaller way, through the Frank fund, gift of Mrs. E. Frank. We look after the educational wants of our Russian newcomers; we soon will be able to care for our old people. What is wanting? We have made no provision for such as are temporarily embarrassed, who for the loan of a few hundreds of dollars might succeed in gaining, once and for all, an honorable independence.

    5

    These are not to be confounded with the ordinary applicants for aid in our relief offices. Here is a field of new benevolence. It is not a charity in the ordinary sense of the word. Nor need it be unprofitable. A society to make loans of this kind is a necessity in our Jewish community, and would repay on the investment a yearly return from two to three percent. The loans are collected in small instalments, but with unfailing regularity, and without concessions. The interest is paid willingly by the recipients of the loans, for that relieves them of all imputation of having received charity. The experiment has been tried in London and has proved successful. That we should attempt something similar in our community, none is more competent to testify than those who almost daily are asked to give help in the direction outlined.

    We hope that a loan society will be organized on the basis proposed. None would lose, but many would gain by this new institution, which, while truly benevolent, would not be charitable in the common meaning of the term.

    The Jewish charities of our city have undoubtedly during the past decade grown in a most gratifying manner. Our population has increased, our means for doing good have become larger, ...

    Jewish
    II D 1, II D 3, I A 3, II D 8
  • Reform Advocate -- May 15, 1891
    [Various Activities]

    The annual meeting of the Jewish Training School was held on Tuesday night in the Sinai Temple vestry rooms. The Training School was organized for the purpose of helping the children of the hapless victims of Russians who settle here in Chicago.

    It endeavored to make of them useful citizens, and send them out in later years equipped to make a decent livelihood for themselves. The course of study is divided into three departments. The Kindergarten, the Primary Department, and the Grammar Department. It was designed to cover twelve years.

    The children are enrolled at the age of three years in the Kindergarten Class. In this class, is laid the foundation of future education. By means of a variety of fitting songs and dances and by a large number of interesting games and exercises, the slumbering mental powers of the child are rationally awakened, and later on he brings to his studies, activity, attention and vivacity. 180 children are enrolled in the Kindergarten Class.

    2

    The Primary Department is divided into four classes, each of which has a class instructor who teaches the ordinary branches, while special branches are taught by specialists. The course of study in English branches include Arithmetic, Reading, Spelling, Penmanship, Elementary Geography, and language. Upon completing four years in this grade, the child is prepared to enter upon more advanced work. He is able to pronounce and spell ordinary words correctly, and is capable of using whole numbers and fractions in their written and oral form. He is acquainted, in a general way, with the people and great industries of different parts of the world, and can express his acquired knowledge in simple but correct English. History is taught in a simple way, as are also Sewing, Free-hand Drawing, Slojd and Paste-board work, Gymnastics and Music. 280 pupils are enrolled in the four primary grades.

    The Grammar Department also consists of four classes. The instruction, imparted by special teachers only, embraces: 1) English (Reading Writing, Grammar and Composition). 2) Systematic History and Geography. 3) Arithmetic, Geometry and Algebra (the latter in the two highest classes only). 4) Physics and Chemistry 3(by experiment only). 5) Natural History (Zoology in winter, Botany in spring and fall). 6) German. 7) Art (Modeling, Free-hand Drawing and Designing). 8) Mechanics (Wood-work, Bench-work, Machine-work (Wood and Metal for boys), Sewing, cutting and fitting, (Dress-making for girls). 9) Gymnastics and Music.

    About 250 pupils are enrolled in the Grammar Department.

    All these branches are now being raught in the school. The difficult lesson of cleanliness has been learned by the cildren and through Mothers' meetings, we have won the confidence and co-operation of the parents.

    The night school, under the charge of our Superintendent, educates some 300 adults in the elements of our language and the history of our country, as well as in Book-keeping and Dressmaking. These classes have accomplished incalculable good.

    The financial reports showed that the total receipts had been $59,171.61, and the total disbursements, $54,855.88, leaving a balance of $4,315.73. The cost of the 4of the grounds and building, complete, was $52,276.01.

    The buget for the coming year estimates the expenses at $17,000, and the receipts at $10,000. The matter of devising ways and means to meet the deficit was referred to the new Board of Directors.

    The election for the eight new directors resulted as follows: Mrs. E. Mandel, Mrs. M. Rosnebaum, Mrs. M. Loeb, J. L. Gatzert and Mr. H. B. Frank. Mrs. Witkowsky and Mr. Hefter were elected to fill the places of Mrs. Harry Meyer and Mr. Julius Rosenthal, the remainder were re-elected.

    The meeting then adjourned.

    The annual meeting of the Jewish Training School was held on Tuesday night in the Sinai Temple vestry rooms. The Training School was organized for the purpose of helping the ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, I A 1 a, II A 3 a, II A 3 b, I A 3
  • Reform Advocate -- July 03, 1891
    [Hope for Our Children]

    The friends, who attende the closing exercises of the Training School and inspected the exhibited work of the classes, must have carried away from their visit, the deep impression and certainty that marcelous results have been attained in the incredulously brief time that the school has been in operation.

    For our poor Russian brethren's children, the Training School offers the weapon for contest which they, will have to fight, most unrelentingly and most fiercely. A double portion of the world's distrust has come to them. They are Jews and Russian Jews. For the Russian children, the school holds a promise which, were its pupils recruited from other elements or our population, would perhaps not be so prominently noteworthy.

    The school will neutralize hereditary instincts, alive in consequence of centuries old persecution among their class, and difficult to eradicate.

    2

    A love for manual labor will be inculcated into the souls of our pupils. They will appreciate once more the dignity of a mechanic's station, and will learn to shun the paths of petty commerce. And the children cannot fail to re-act upon the parents.

    It is a curious fact, and one to be pleased with, that the settlers from the dominion of the Czar, regard the school as their own. They take pride in it. They are eager to have their sons and daughters attend, and the evening classes comprise men and women of all ages.

    The friends, who attende the closing exercises of the Training School and inspected the exhibited work of the classes, must have carried away from their visit, the deep impression and ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, I A 3, I C
  • Reform Advocate -- July 03, 1891
    [Our School Problem]

    The conduct of the Trustees of the Baron de Hirsch Fund, in regard to our Training School, is, to use a mild expression, most perplexing. In a weak hour, the directors of the School ventured to lay the financial situation before them, believing that the nature of the work and the increased necessities arising from the constant addition to the population of Chicago from Russia, entitled them to some slight consideration on the part of the fund.

    Although no one here in Chicago paid attention to our supposed interview and protest in regard to Russian immigration, the trustees of the Baron de Hirsch Fund in New York gave it credence there.

    When the directors of the Training School learned what the New York gentlemen thought of the occurrence, they took at once the trouble to correct the wrong impression and to disavow any sympathy with the Alleged views of the gentlemen. Now comes the reply that the damage done by the interview is too great 2to be repaired by a late denial.

    Therefore the school is entitled to no consideration. This is logic with a vengeance. What has our school to do with any other charity in Chicago? Our applicants increase daily. Our evening school, which we would not need, were it not for the steady influx of these strangers, deprives the main school of a large support, which otherwise it would enjoy from the lodges who now pay for the evening classes, in part, while the directors bear the additional expense of fuel, gas, and incidentals.

    The conduct of the Trustees of the Baron de Hirsch Fund, in regard to our Training School, is, to use a mild expression, most perplexing. In a weak hour, the ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, II D 1, I C, I A 3
  • Reform Advocate -- May 13, 1893
    (No headline)

    The annual meeting of the members of the Jewish Training School was held at Sinai. The following information was given in the Director's Report:

    The Sinking Fund was increased by donations of $14,500 making the total amount $31,600. There were 700 children under the care of the school during the year. The organization has prepared an elaborate exhibit for the World's Fair, which will clearly illustrate the methods applied in the institution from the Kindergarten to the highest grade. The Fair Committee on Education have been generous in their allotment of space.

    At a meeting held on Nov. 14th, 1892, the school's constitution was amended so as to enable it to conduct a night class for persons over 14 years of age. In accordance therewith, Johannah Lodge appropriated $1,400 into the J. T. S. treasury and a night school for women was conducted under the supervision of Prof. Bamberger. The average attendance was about 100 and these foreign born women were given the opportunity to learn English, dressmaking and sewing.

    The report of the Financial Secretary showed that the school received into its treasury during the year, about $34,500.

    The annual meeting of the members of the Jewish Training School was held at Sinai. The following information was given in the Director's Report: The Sinking Fund was increased by ...

    Jewish
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 10, 1909
    Chicago Hebrew Institute Night School for Skilled Workers

    A class of drawing and estimating for Jewish workers in the steamheating and hot-water system trades is being formed in the Institute Trade School. The dates for registration are October 23 and 25. A class in chemistry and boiler and engine room work will also be established. Full information regarding these courses can be obtained at the office of the Institute.

    A class of drawing and estimating for Jewish workers in the steamheating and hot-water system trades is being formed in the Institute Trade School. The dates for registration are October ...

    Jewish
    I A 3, II B 2 f
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 20, 1910
    (No headline)

    The Chicago Hebrew Institute, 1258 Tailor street, is informing the Jewish public through the Jewish Courier's columns of the opening of the following school and classes for the 1910-11 season. A daily Hebrew school, where children will be fundamentally and systematically instructed in the Hebrew language, grammar, the Old Testament, and Jewish history.

    The school will be supervised by Rabbi Morris Leving, and the classes will be instructed two hours every day from 4 to 6 P.M. A Sabbath and Sunday School for girls will start Saturday, November 5. English evening classes for adults (men and women) will begin Monday, October 31. A trade school for young men to study suitable paying trades which will take care of their future.

    The following trades will be taught: Plumbing and elementary advancement in the eletrical trade in its different branches; drafting, mechanical and architectural; instruction will be given in the following trades: Machinery, carpentry, brick-laying, plumbing, metal and iron work, steam heating, etc., and mathematics which is very essential for the above mentioned trades.

    2

    The days for registration are Thursday and Saturday, October 20 - 22, from 7 to 9 P. M. On Sunday, the 23rd, from 2 to 4 P. M.

    Sewing classes for school girls every day from 4 to 6 P. M. and for women from 7:30 to 9:30 P. M. Kindergarten for children under six years, every morning from 9 to 12 Noon.

    The Chicago Hebrew Institute, 1258 Tailor street, is informing the Jewish public through the Jewish Courier's columns of the opening of the following school and classes for the 1910-11 season. ...

    Jewish
    II D 6, II B 2 f, I A 3, I A 2 a
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- October 18, 1911
    (No headline)

    The Chicago Hebrew Institute opens the new winter season with a great and rich program of Jewish activities.

    The Chicago Hebrew Institute is without a doubt one of the most useful Institutions in Chicago Jewry. It takes this method of notifying the Jewish public of the opening of the 7th annual winter season.

    According to Dr. Joseph Pidot, the superintendent of the Hebrew Institute, who was interviewed by a Courier reporter, the coming winter season will surpass all previous years. The Hebrew Institute is now the main spiritual center in Chicago, not only for the immigrants, but also for Americanized-Jews. They all find a certain interest in the Institute. From day to day the Institute is drawing out the enthusiasm of the Jewish public. Great preparations are being made by the different committees and with Dr. Pidot at the head, it surely looks like success.

    2

    The Institute officers have arranged for a series of lectures. The lecturers selected are people of great talent, personality, prominence, and International reputation. Among these are Miss Jane Adams of Hull House, W. M. French of the Chicago Art Institute, N. I. Rubins, Dr. Yaros, Professors of Universities, etc. They will speak on the subjects of Political Economy,Sociology, Science, Literature and Knowledge in general. The lectures will certainly be interesting and instructive. Price of admission 10ยข. The time and place of meeting will be announced later.

    The Institute has arranged for an orchestra of boys and girls, who are skilled in different kinds of musical instruments. Mr. Alexander Zshokowsky, the well known violinist, will have full charge of the orchestra. All who are interested in orchestral music may make application for entry, at once, at the office of the Institute.

    The dancing school of the Hebrew Institute will be ready for new applications on the 21st.

    The Civic Bureau will have classes, especially for new immigrants, to teach them 3how to become American citizens. Every immigrant no doubt understands the importance of citizenship, hence you are urged not to neglect this and to take advantage of this privilege.

    The people's concerts will start again next Sunday, October 29th. Last year these concerts drew large crowds, and this season, Dr. Pidot assures the public of much more interesting musical programs. With the presence of the well known and beloved violinist, Mr. Alexander Zshokowsky and the noted Thomas orchestra, we see no reason not to expect great crowds of music lovers.

    From time to time, we will keep you informed of the Hebrew Institute activities. At the present time we urge you to visit our Institution, and we will take great pleasure in showing you all particulars in the different departments.

    The Chicago Hebrew Institute opens the new winter season with a great and rich program of Jewish activities. The Chicago Hebrew Institute is without a doubt one of the most ...

    Jewish
    II D 6, I A 3, II B 1 a
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- May 20, 1912
    Graduation at the Hebrew Institute

    Diplomas were distributed yesterday to eighteen students in the English classes of the Hebrew Institute. The ceremony of distributing the diplomas was beautifully performed. Mr. Israel Koven was chairman. The meeting was opened with great pomp. Mr. Sol Alberty, director of the glee club of the Chicago Hebrew Institute, played a piano solo. Judge Hugo Pam addressed the students on the subject of optimism, which impressed the eighteen youths who received their diplomas with much pride. Many songs were sung by the glee club of the Hebrew Institute. Mr. Joseph Pidot made the closing address. He spoke interestingly to those present. The subject of the address was "Trade Unions and American Freedom".

    Diplomas were distributed yesterday to eighteen students in the English classes of the Hebrew Institute. The ceremony of distributing the diplomas was beautifully performed. Mr. Israel Koven was chairman. The ...

    Jewish
    I A 1 a, II D 6, I A 3, IV
  • Daily Jewish Courier -- June 28, 1912
    To the Chicago Jewry.

    It is pitiful to see how parents are killing themselves to raise their children as Jews, and the children can not even read Hebrew. Our daughters, the future Jewish mothers, will know nothing about Judaism. The Hebrew language is being forgotten. Our great forefathers and our ancient prophets are unknown to our children. Even the origin of our holidays are unknown to our children.

    2

    The Yabneh Institute, which will be opened Saturday, July 4, will consist of one Hebrew school for boys, through which, we guarantee that the children will have a clear conception of the Bible (Pentateuch, Prophets, Hagiographia) and will know a great deal of Jewish history; a large library, where anybody will be welcome to read about Jewish matters in any language; a Sabbath school where Jewish girls will learn to read, write, and speak Hebrew; lectures for adults and children on Jewish history and Judaism in general; a glee club; and chiefly, a large, beautiful, and modern synagogue for services and study. A noted cantor, in cooperation with the glee club will officiate the services. All are welcome to attend the synagogue services. All Jews are welcome to join this noble institute at the rate of $3 per year.

    It is pitiful to see how parents are killing themselves to raise their children as Jews, and the children can not even read Hebrew. Our daughters, the future Jewish mothers, ...

    Jewish
    II D 6, I A 2 a, II B 2 a, I A 3, III C