The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • L'italia -- January 02, 1909
    Employment Office

    At the Masonic Temple, on Dec. 21, there will be a meeting of the Agricultural section of the Italian Chamber of Commerce, under the presidency of G. Garibaldi and the Italian Consul, Mr. Sabetta.

    Plans for setting up a centralized employment office for the Italian immigrants will be discussed.

    An institution of this sort will be of great help to our countrymen.

    It is planned to make it self-supporting.

    At the Masonic Temple, on Dec. 21, there will be a meeting of the Agricultural section of the Italian Chamber of Commerce, under the presidency of G. Garibaldi and the ...

    Italian
    II D 8, II A 2, III G, III H, I L, IV
  • Chicago Italian Chamber of Commerce -- September 10, 1913
    Meeting of the Agriculture Section.-Oct. 16, 1913

    President of the section James Ozello, and the members: Messrs. Maestro-Valerio, Mirando, Chiostri and Schmidt were present.

    The memorial sent to the Chamber by the representative of the Federal Government in regard to the colonization plan in the state of Texas. A plan which would be under the surveillance of the Government itself, giving the colonists full protection against any fraud or lapse in any promise made by the land owners.

    The plan was discussed in minute detail by Mr. Schmidt, who is an expert, and by a suggestion of the Secretary of the Section, Mr. Maestro-Valerio: it was approved to ask the Italian Ambassador at Washington for confirmation of the suggestion made by the Government's representative, and to have the approval of the Embassy before inducing Italians to settle on land for farms.

    Another colonization suggestion, made by Carl N. Baer was read, and it was decided to write to him, asking for the latest information concerning his territory selling conditions, etc., also to ask him to let us know if he would permit one 2of our committees to visit his territory and investigate it.

    C.R. Schmidt and A. Maestro-Valerio were appointed to form the Commission which will visit and inspect the other colonization projects in the state of Missouri on the 24th of this month.

    President of the section James Ozello, and the members: Messrs. Maestro-Valerio, Mirando, Chiostri and Schmidt were present. The memorial sent to the Chamber by the representative of the Federal Government ...

    Italian
    II A 2, III A, III H, I L
  • Chicago Italian Chamber of Commerce -- September 10, 1913
    At a Meeting of the Directive Council, Oct. 17

    Vice-President Barbieri officiated and the following were present: Meranda, Garibaldi, G. Malato, Davia, Formusa and Maestro-Valerio.

    The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

    A letter received from the United States Chamber of Commerce was read and acted upon. The questionnaires sent by the Royal Commission for the purpose of getting the lay-out of customs, duties, and the Commercial treaty, were studied and discussed, and the president was authorized to appoint a committee to study the answers to be given.

    The Councillor, Maestro Valerio, Secretary of the Agricultural Section, explained the activities of his office in regard to the colonization plan, initiated by the Government of the United States, and told how the Agriculture Section decided to communicate with the Italian Ambassador at Washington, to see whether the Government will protect our colonists.

    He also said that the Agriculture Section had other plans under consideration, 2and that the Commission recently appointed will visit some section of the State of Missouri at the end of the month.

    It was decided to use the profits from the advertisements in the Bulletin to improve and increase the circulation of the Bulletin itself.

    Vice-President Barbieri officiated and the following were present: Meranda, Garibaldi, G. Malato, Davia, Formusa and Maestro-Valerio. The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. A letter received from ...

    Italian
    II A 2, II B 2 d 2, III A, III H, I L, IV
  • L'italia -- May 02, 1920
    A Company for the Manufacture of Cheese and Sheep Raising

    The Alabama Sheep Raising and Agricultural Company was organized in the state of Illinois. The principal object of the new company is the manufacture of the Italian cheese. For this purpose, the company has bought in the state of Alabama, more than ten thousand (10,000) acres of land and is on the way to buy a few thousand sheep for the production of milk used in manufacture of different kinds of Italian cheese.

    Active in organizing the Italo-American new industry, that is welcomed by the Italian community, is Mr. Michele Di Salvo who has a wide experience in the manufacture of cheese from sheep milk. Other members of this organization are Dr. Joseph Monaco, Sam Sisco, Paul V. Colianni, Peter Sisco, Igino Monaco, Joseph Di Re.

    We wish good luck to our energetic countrymen.

    The Alabama Sheep Raising and Agricultural Company was organized in the state of Illinois. The principal object of the new company is the manufacture of the Italian cheese. For this ...

    Italian
    II A 2, I L
  • La Fiamma -- November 01, 1923
    The Non-Americanization of Immigrants An Answer to Elizabeth Fracer's Article in the Saturday Evening Post

    Whoever read the article in The Saturday Evening Post, Aug. 14th, 1923, entitled:

    "Our Foreign Cities-Chicago." by Elizabeth Frazer, certainly received a most deplorable impression of European immigrants, especially of the Italians, in the United States, because the authoress interests herself, particularly, in the lowest class of emigrant and sets forth its deficiencies and misery only. Her information, no doubt, came from one of the many insignificant labor agencies, whose chief are notoriously known as unscrupulous merchants in human flesh, and are not in a position to give just information regarding immigrants in general. On the other hand, 2the authoress omits mentioning the good qualities of the immigrants and entirely disregards the better element which European emigration particularly the Italian, has brought to America.

    A conscientious writer ought to set forth not only the "cons" but also the "pros," that is to say, the favorable as well as the unfavorable, especially when subjects of such vital social importance are concerned. Otherwise the reader only sees one side of the truth, (if the truth exists in Elizabeth Frazer's article), and it is upon this one and only side that he bases his opinion on the subject discussed by a careless and unjust writer.

    Elizabeth Frazer treats her subject in such a pessimistic way that she came to the conclusion, that immigrants, the Italian in particular, are absolutely unsusceptible to Americanization and to the assimilation. Consequently, in her conclusion she does not recognize in the immigrant in this country even the natural instinct of an animal towards its own betterment.

    3

    I believe I know the Italian immigrants of the United States well enough, having studied their situation for a long time and having published a book covering my impressions entitled: "The Journal of the Italian Immigrant in North America," (Chicago), therefore, I venture to set forth a few facts quite contrary to the foolish, misleading and slanderous assertions of Elizabeth Frazer.

    For instance, there are hundreds of thousands of Italians in the United States who are naturalized American citizens.

    In agriculture, the industries, in commerce, fiance, politics, sport, science, art and education, in fact, in all fields of American activity, the Italian immigrants have demonstrated in the past, and will demonstrate more and more, that they know how to Americanize themselves and assimilate to the fullest extent that which America offers them.

    Furthermore, the immigrants of today are not like the ones of the old days, to whom, no doubt, Elizabeth Frazer refers with such posthumus zeal.

    4

    Immigration: The American Commissioner of Immigration at Ellis Island is an Italian, Mr. Caminetti, who has held the office for years.

    Labor: The members of the American labor organizations are a good part Italians.

    Agriculture: The vineyards, the orange and lemon orchards, the very finest of their kind in this country, were grown and developed to their present state by Italian immigrants and are in their hands.

    Industries: The Boston fisheries, considered among the most important in the United States, were established and developed to their present flourishing state by Italian immigrants and are in their hands.

    Commerce: South Water Street of Chicago, one of the wonders of Chicago and the most important wholesale fruit market in the United States, was established and developed to its present state by Italian immigrants and it is almost entirely in their hands. An Italian immigrant, Mr. Garibaldi, was for years and up to his death, President of the South Water Street wholesale merchants organization.

    5

    Among the high grade confectioners in Chicago, the Allegretti Co., has enjoyed a splendid reputation for years.

    Finance: The greatest American Bank of the West from Chicago to California, is the Bank of Italy in San Francisco, established and developed to its present state by Italian immigrants and that bank is in their hands. This bank has numerous branches, among them the New York branch, which rivals the greatest banks of that city.

    The Italians, Conte Minotto, is Vice-President of the Boulevard Bridge Bank in Chicago.

    Politics: The President of the City Council of New York is the Italian, Fiorello La Guardia, who was also candidate for Mayor of New York during the last election.

    The District Attorney of New York City is the Italian, Mr. Pecora. A State Senator of New York is the Italian, Mr. Cotillo.

    6

    Among the Judges in Chicago there are three Italians, Barasa, Borelli, Gualano. Judge Barasa was also candidate for Mayor of Chicago during the last election. And in smaller American cities some of the Mayors are Italian.

    Science: The only American Pasteur Institute in Chicago is the one established and directed by the Italian, Dr. Lagorio. One of the best American hospitals in Chicago is the Columbus Hospital facing Lincoln Park, established and owned by Italians. The Italian, John B. Zingrone of Chicago is one of the greatest American X-ray operators. He was confidential assistant to the famous surgeon, Prof. J. B. Murphy, who appointed him to make the X-ray pictures of President Theodore Roosevelt.

    Art: The Italian, Count di Cesnola, was for years, up to his death, the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of New York. The two greatest American opera companies are in the hands of Italians, i.e., the New York Opera Company being directed by the Italian, Gatticasazza, and the Chicago Opera Company by the Italian, Maestro Polacco. Among the best American moving picture stars is 7the Italian, Rudolfo Valentino. There are many others. Not counting the myriads of American singers, music teachers, architects, sculptors, artists, who are of Italian blood. The architect of the Union Station of Chicago, now under construction and said to be the greatest railroad station in the world, is an Italian. The American inventor of artificial lightning is the Italian engineer, Mr. Faccioli.

    Professions: There are hundreds of Italians, naturalized American citizens, who are practicing law, hundreds of physicians as well as druggists.

    Sports: The American Golf champion is the Italian, Sarazene. The American champion of automobile racing is the Italian, De Palma. Among the American ring champions are the Italians, Dundee, Wilson, Gennaro and even Dempsey, who is of Italian descent.

    The American cowboy winner of the recent horse races at Harlem, New York, is the Italian, Tony Pagona. In swimming, running, bicycling and motorcycle racing, 8some of the best champions are Italians.

    Hygiene: Several of the finest residences in choice sections of Chicago are occupied by Italian millionaires like Cuneo, Costa, Garibaldi, Dr. Lagorio.

    Education: One of the greatest American educators is the Italian, Angelo Patri, not counting the numerous Catholic American educational institutions, (universities, colleges, high schools), in all parts of the United States, almost all established and directed by Italians. Dozens of professors in the American universities and colleges are Italians.

    In the high school examinations in New York City, two Italian boys, Bernard and Vincent Cioffari, exceeded by 5.03 and 3.77, respectively, the very highest average (92%) ever attained by anyone in the history of New York schools.

    I could mention many other facts to prove that the Italian immigrants desire and 9know how to Americanize themselves, that they desire and know how to assimilate the best America has to offer them by securing for themselves American positions of such importance, and in every field imaginable, as to be envied by those Americans whose individuality Elizabeth Frazer so highly praises. Such positions are attained by Italian immigrants notwithstanding the disadvantages they suffer due to the difference in language and, more than anything else, to the cruel prejudice held against them, such as those found in the lines of Elizabeth Frazer's article.

    However, I still want to call attention to the many marriages between high class Americans and Italians in America, which naturally indicates that Italian immigrants do become naturalized American citizens, and, that they assimilate the good America offers to them.

    In addition, there is not an Italian newspaper in the United States, that does not continually preach to Italian immigrants the Gospel of Americanization.

    10

    At any rate, if the Italian quarters of any city lack cleanliness the fault lies particularly with the American health authorities who neglect such quarters and do not enforce, with the necessary vigor, the observance of the laws covering public hygiene.

    One should not entirely condemn the ignorant, the humble, the poor, and insist that they should spontaneously uplift themselves. Instead, the learned and the rich, who generally neglect the ignorant and the poor, should extend to them a helping hand in order to uplift them to a higher standard of living. This ought to be the mission of real civilization.

    This is the most sacred and most beautiful mission that America has to accomplish, since she believes herself, nowadays, to be the leading Nation of the world.

    Whoever read the article in The Saturday Evening Post, Aug. 14th, 1923, entitled: "Our Foreign Cities-Chicago." by Elizabeth Frazer, certainly received a most deplorable impression of European immigrants, especially of ...

    Italian
    III A, II B 2 d 1, II A 3 b, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, II A 1, II A 2, II D 3, III G, I C, I L, I M, IV
  • Il Bollettino Sociale -- June 02, 1930
    Where and for What Italians Spend Their Money (Editorial)

    Italians? The Americanized Italian who has found America quite to his taste and consequently has learned to live according to American standards knows well enough what to do with his money and where to put it. Though the Italian has become thoroughly Americanized, traces of the old soil still cling to him. The Americanized Italian may have American-born children, but even these children develop an unconscious love for Italy which is easy to perceive. Living in America and earning American wages have made the Italian and descendants loyal to their adopted country. Yet try as they will, they cannot eradicate the instincts that have been carried down through the ages and incorporated in their very heart-beats. They are forced to sympathize with their fellow-countrymen by the intense feelings of their ardent natures which, once aroused, are hard to quench. This indomitable love for their own kind causes them to trade in stores, of which Italians are the proprietors.

    The same tendency is even more apparent in their habit of banking. The country is dotted with countless Italian banks. One of these small foundations has developed into a large chain of banks operated by a kind and understanding Italian-American.

    2

    Many of the smaller Italian banks receive money from their depositors only to turn it over to this larger institution for safe-keeping. There are also a few ambitious Italians whose aim is to found more chain banks and thereby increase banking facilities for their depositors. In spite of the fact that they deposit their money in banks, poor Italians hope some day to own their own homes. This is another instinct born of their original soil. Home to the Italian is his altar of rest as the church is his altar of hope.

    Every young, old, or middle-aged Italian desires above everything else a home of his own. Italians save money with this end in view. Since they do not believe in installments, they prefer to save a large sum first and then buy land or a house outright. In many cases they prefer to buy land, knowing well that Mother Earth is their safest bet, and that she will give them food besides a home. The farming instinct, too, is pre-eminently characteristic of the Italian. To save a certain sum and then buy land with it is what nine hundred and ninety-nine Italians out of a thousand do or hope to do some day. Mother Earth can never fail them. If they cannot build a house right away, they can get potatoes, corn, and cabbages out of the soil and thereby subsist. Thrift is second nature to the Italian; he can very often afford to buy real estate outright, but if he cannot, he pays off his mortgage scrupulously and exactly. To him a home is safer than a bank account. It means 3more. Land doubles the value of a bank-book. So the Italian chooses a home first and then looks around for a convenient friendly bank in which to deposit his savings. But, although he has been in the United States for twenty years, he will always choose a place where he can tread on familiar ground, one with Italian characteristics.

    It is not his own doing but his innate subconscious love for the land of his ancestors, which can never die.

    Italians? The Americanized Italian who has found America quite to his taste and consequently has learned to live according to American standards knows well enough what to do with his ...

    Italian
    III H, II A 2, III A, III H, I L
  • Chicago Italian Chamber of Commerce -- [Unknown date]
    Report of the President

    Since it is a duty for the various sections and commissions to make an annual report in detail of its activities, I will only talk briefly of the accomplishment of this Chamber of Commerce in general during 1916.

    An important role was performed by the Imports and Exports Commission, which appealed to our Government for larger concessions on exports of products of which we are much in need.

    This Chamber of Commerce has supported all the worthwhile projects instituted by the Italian Chamber of Commerce of New York.

    2

    The Agricultural Section, through the efforts of Mastro Valerio, secretary, has given free of charge all the information requested by our countrymen interested in agriculture and has accomplished much.

    It is my opinion that there is no better work for this Chamber of Commerce, than that of helping the Italians in this colonization movement and we urge them to leave the big cities and dedicate themselves to farming which is a source of wealth and health.

    The Commission on Commercial Information was accomplishing useful work, and this statement is confirmed by many letters received thanking this Chamber for the valuable information obtained.

    3

    About our financial standing as was reported by the Financial Commission December 31, 1916, this Chamber had on hand about one thousand dollars in cash. The subscription made, as was resolved and approved last August, produced eight hundred dollars. As for the preceding years and during 1916, this Chamber received the regular government subsidy and 1,000 lire as extra subsidy given by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, through the efforts of the Italian Consul of Chicago.

    It is my interest to state that besides the work accomplished by the sections and commissions, this Chamber has done her part with correspondence, with translations and information of every kind, and many other important matters concerning our attribution.

    4

    I like to remember the activity of this Chamber in behalf of the Allied Bazaar, and I am proud to say that the contribution given by it and its members was will appreciated by the Bazaar Committee and by our Consul.

    It is my duty to thank the vice presidents, Formusa and Bragno and the treasurer, Mr. Rigali, for valuable cooperation given me during the first year of my presidency.

    Since it is a duty for the various sections and commissions to make an annual report in detail of its activities, I will only talk briefly of the accomplishment of ...

    Italian
    II A 2, III A, III H, I L, IV
  • Chicago Italian Chamber of Commerce -- [Unknown date]
    Report of the Agricultural Section, Session of July 7, 1921

    The session was opened at 3 p. m. Present were President Fiore Di Giorgio, Vice President and Secretary Alessandro Mastrovalerio, and Anthony Ferrari.

    A. Ferrari, referring to the decision of March 1, 1921, in which it was agreed, upon proposal by Mastrovalerio, to write to all the Post Offices of Illinois for the purpose of determining the number of Italian farmers residing in Illinois, reported to the Commission that Mr. Di Giorgio has personally sustained all the expenses of mailing 2,000 circulars and from the replies, it was ascertained that there are 139 Italian engaged in agriculture in Illinois.

    The session was opened at 3 p. m. Present were President Fiore Di Giorgio, Vice President and Secretary Alessandro Mastrovalerio, and Anthony Ferrari. A. Ferrari, referring to the decision of ...

    Italian
    I L, II A 2, V A 2, IV
  • Chicago Italian Chamber of Commerce -- [Unknown date]
    General Meeting of the Chicago Chamber of Commerce

    A general meeting was held February 17th, and many members were present.

    The president made his report on the activities of the Chamber of Commerce during 1913.

    The president of the Industrial section, Mr. Spagiari reported that through the efforts of that section many firms in Italy became members of this Chamber. The councillor, Mr. Mastro-Valerio, secretary of the Agriculture section reported in detail all the work accomplished by his section during 1913.

    He talked about a new colonization project sent to this Chamber of Commerce by the "Reclamation Service" and he hoped that the Section would send a Committee to inspect the land for farms, the location, climate and productive value, and would make known their findings in a report on which the Chamber of Commerce will advise our countrymen before they buy. He condemned the practice of Italian farmers settling in the big cities, and he is of the opinion that it would be more profitable for them and for America to join the Agricultural colonies, such as those of Mississippi, the Allegheny Mountains, Florida, Arkansas, 2Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, etc. Councillor Postorino reported on the accomplishments of the Imports and Exports Commission.

    Councillor Formusa gave a detailed account of the income and expenses of the second semester for 1913, from which it appeared that on December 31, 1913, the cash on hand was $674.02 as shown in the following statement:

    Cash on hand, July 1st, 1913 $ 92.75
    Income during two semesters 1,887.07
    Credits to be collected 158.65
    Government subsidy- 1st semester 1914 389.76
    Total Income $2,529.13
    Expenses for the second semester 1,855.11
    Balance Jan. 1st. $ 674.02

    Mr. Merando reporting on the useful work done by the Progapanda Commission and stated that through their efforts the membership list was greatly increased during 1913. Then they proceeded with the election of Councillors; the following receiving a unanimous vote: Cavalier F. Cuneo, F. Bragno, G.Malato, V.Formusa, G.Garibaldi, A.Mastro Valerio, M. Mastrogiovanni, A. Gualano.

    A general meeting was held February 17th, and many members were present. The president made his report on the activities of the Chamber of Commerce during 1913. The president of ...

    Italian
    II A 2, III A, III H, I L, IV
  • Bulletin Italian Chamber of Commerce -- [Unknown date]
    The Italian Colony at Roma, Illinois

    The Italian Land and Home Development Association of Chicago (a common law investment) which is composed of prominent Italians of Chicago, is undertaking to settle an Italian colony in the vicinity of Springfield, Illinois, and near Beneld, Hamilton, Gilespie, and Wilsonville, all located in the leading coal mining districts of Illinois. The new colony will be known as Roma, and will be a short five-minute walk from the Sawyerville station of the Springfield-St. Louis Electrified Railway.

    The Italian Land and Home Association acquired a fertile tract of land which was subdivided into two-acre plots. The price of a plot is not beyond the average Italian's ability to pay and the terms of payment are extended over a long period of time. Colonists are assured of employment in the coal mines.

    For further information apply to the Italian Land and Home Association, Edison Bldg., Chicago, Illinois.

    The Italian Land and Home Development Association of Chicago (a common law investment) which is composed of prominent Italians of Chicago, is undertaking to settle an Italian colony in the ...

    Italian
    I L, II A 2