The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 16, 1877
    Italian Slave Dealers

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an Italian, living at 527 S. Clark St. was subjected to a severe grilling in the Southside police station for alleged Slave dealing in Italian children. Here is what happened: A little boy, unable to speak English, was met by a policeman freezing and crying. The friendly night policeman brought the boy to an Italian man, to help out as interpreter. The little one told, that his father had rented him out to Mallelo for twenty-five dollars a year. For that he was obliged to walk daily through the streets with his harp on his back and play music. The money thus collected he had to give to his cruel master in the evening. It was too bad for him if he did not hand over a minimum amount to his torturer. He was then beaten and received nothing to eat. Often he was sent out again into the dark night to complete the sum. If he was again unsuccessful he had to look for another shelter or sleep in the open.

    2

    The court proceeding revealed that Mallelo was keeping eight boys in similar bondage. He gave the boys shelter and food for one dollar a week. Investigations are continuing. It is to be hoped that charitable people will be found to take care of the little Italian slave.

    The shameful trade in Italian children which has already made its appearance in several cities and been prosecuted more than once has also come to light here. Emmanuel Mallelo, an ...

    Italian
    II E 1, I C
  • L'italia -- January 25, 1890
    "Schools"

    Mr. M. Nardi will help the Italian families of Clark St. He opened a school at 505 S. Clark St. at his own expense, for both young and adults. Mr. Nardi has offered this free to the Italian people of that community. Mr. Nardi has two schools opened on his expense. The other school is at 17 W. Kinzie St. Because he is teaching at the school on Kinzie St. he cannot be at the school on Clark St. Therefore he is asking any Italian who is willing to do the teaching gratis to contribute his services.

    These schools are also opened on Saturdays and Sundays, and are used as a library. Any one who wishes to attend may do so free of charge. There are newspapers, magazines, romances and other books for people to read.

    There are also American families living among the poorest Italian families of the West Side, and are doing their utmost to help them. We 2should thank them for their most appreciated help.

    With the help of Mr. Mastrovalerio, Italian teachers are teaching in evening schools, English to our Italians. Mr. Mastrovalerio is trying his best in getting more Italian teachers for evening schools, because there are an immense number of Italians enlisting in evening schools to learn English.

    Mr. M. Nardi will help the Italian families of Clark St. He opened a school at 505 S. Clark St. at his own expense, for both young and adults. Mr. ...

    Italian
    II B 2 f, I A 3, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1890
    Garibaldi Monument

    The Garibaldi Monument Club which was incorporated in the month of May, held a meeting yesterday at the Grand Pacific Hotel. It is the intention of the club to erect a monument in some park in honor of Garibaldi. The cost is expected to be about $20,000 or $25,000. The donations subscribed yesterday amounted to $640.

    The names of the Executive Committee show that the plan is not of an exclusively Italian origin. The elected officials are: G. Ginnochi, president; Judge D. J. Lyons, and W. R. Dyrenfurth. Forty-three names are listed, including the above mentioned, most of them being Italian.

    The Garibaldi Monument Club which was incorporated in the month of May, held a meeting yesterday at the Grand Pacific Hotel. It is the intention of the club to erect ...

    Italian
    II C, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 26, 1891
    Angry Italians Demand the Removal of the Local Consul

    Such a strong and violent meeting as the one held last night at the hall of the Forward Club by the Italians in favor of the much persecuted editor, Oscar Durante, has not been equaled for a long time.

    The meeting was called by the President of the Italian Labor Union, Dominico Avallone.

    The Consul is accused of neglecting to display the Italian flag on September 20, although the Italian government ordered the representative to do so. The Italians here interpret it as an act of contempt against them.

    When Dr. Nicola Re tried to defend the Consul, a wild excitement took possession of the crowd, and a dozen Italians stormed the platform and forced Dr. Re's immediate retreat.

    Resolutions were made amidst the tumult, in which the conduct of the Consul September 20, and his attacks upon the Italian newspapers were severely criticised.

    2

    Dr. Re declared that the Consul had given orders to raise the flag on that particular date, but that his order was not carried out by mistake. The Italians demand the removal of the Consul.

    Such a strong and violent meeting as the one held last night at the hall of the Forward Club by the Italians in favor of the much persecuted editor, Oscar ...

    Italian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, III H, IV
  • L'italia -- February 06, 1892
    Ample Proof

    An annual report from the Chicago Police Department, shows that 22,449 persons have been arrested and of these 26 are Italians.

    The Italian population in Chicago is 25,000 which is an average of one Italian arrested in every thousand.

    We are proud to present these figures because some American newspapers stated that the Italians in Chicago are trouble-makers, and these figures show ample proof that they are not.

    An annual report from the Chicago Police Department, shows that 22,449 persons have been arrested and of these 26 are Italians. The Italian population in Chicago is 25,000 which is ...

    Italian
    II E 2, I C
  • L'italia -- June 04, 1892
    Statistics Report

    Statistics show that out of 1,500 inmates in the Illinois State prison at Joliet, only 5 are Italians.

    Statistics show that out of 1,500 inmates in the Illinois State prison at Joliet, only 5 are Italians.

    Italian
    II E 2, I C
  • L'italia -- July 23, 1892
    An Indecent Spectacle

    Walking through the district bounded by Canal, Halsted, Van Buren and Taylor streets, one is offered the shameful spectacle of Italian women with bodice open and breasts exposed, nursing their babies. Neither drunkards' obscene remarks nor the sarcasm of pedestrians serve to awaken in them a feeling of shame for their immodest behavior.

    We appeal to those, whom these women look up to, and hope that they can convince them that nursing babies on the street is not a nice thing to do. Furthermore it gives the Americans another point on which to jeer the Italian.

    Walking through the district bounded by Canal, Halsted, Van Buren and Taylor streets, one is offered the shameful spectacle of Italian women with bodice open and breasts exposed, nursing their ...

    Italian
    III A, I B 3 b, I C
  • L'italia -- October 08, 1892
    (No headline)

    Murder on Tilden Ave.

    The saloon of Luigi Allegretti's saloon was the scene of the killing of one Italian and the wounding of another. The saloon is located at 56 Tilden Ave. in the heart of the Italian quarter.

    Calogero Di Martino was shot to death and Giovanni Ciarciro was wounded. The perpetrator of the crime is unknown since the eye-witnesses to the act, who were held, when questioned by the police professed ignorance of any knowledge of his identity. Several reasons have been given as being the cause, but the one which this paper is inclined to accept is, women and money.

    The two victims were playing cards when some one remarked to Di Martino, "They're after you," to which he answered, "Let them come," and they came.

    2

    There was a scuffling of feet, an interchange of words, a confusion of shots, two, three, four, five, a man staggers to his feet and falls to the floor, another is wounded, and the assasin, - the assasin? No one knows.

    Odd and reprehensible adherence. Di Martino died three hours after the shooting. Before his death he told Police-officer Sullivan that he thought his murderer was Antonio Messineo of 46 W. Ohio St., and because of that, Messineo, after the inquest, was held to the Grand Jury. Ciarciro who had been shot in the back, said he did not see his attempted murderer.

    Held as witnesses, by the police, were Vincenzo Trocco, Michele Maghi, Giovanni Damiano, Vincenzo D'Amato, Luigi Rellishi, and Luigi Allegretto. Antonio Messineo, Guiseppe Azzarro Givachino Correo, and Giuseppe Russo, all residing at 49 W. Ohio St., and Antonio Passero of 137 North Ave. are being hunted by the police in connection with the murder.

    3

    The American newspapers as usual are loudly proclaiming the deed as committed by the Mafia or Black Hand Society, since they have been told by an Italian barber and an Italian storekeeper that the Mafia really exists in Chicago. To give the lie to these two clowns who have so little consideration for the reputation of the Italian Colony in Chicago, we have called in representatives of the leading Chicago newspapers for a group interview on the subject of the Mafia.

    This was Mr. Durante's reply to the Mafia question, in Chicago. "This fable of the Mafia is an unreasonable stupidity, an imbecility pure and simple. Every small quarrel between Italians gives rise to the cry of "Mafia." This organization does not now and never did exist.

    Several of my reporters have been at the scene of the crime and through them, I have definitely established the fact that the shooting occurred because of women and money and that they were more than intoxicated.

    4

    If this had occurred between persons of other nationalities it would not have aroused the present furore. We Italians are becoming fed up with this continual chatter of the existence of a Mafia Society.

    In one of the principal theaters of this city, a farce is presented every evening in which a popular comedian tries to show the public that a leading Italian statesman is the leader of the Mafia. In Saturday's issue of this paper, I have an article protesting against this outrage.

    To make a long story short, the Mafia does not exist in Chicago, nor in Italy."

    Murder on Tilden Ave. The saloon of Luigi Allegretti's saloon was the scene of the killing of one Italian and the wounding of another. The saloon is located at 56 ...

    Italian
    II E 1, II D 9, III H, I C, IV
  • L'italia -- October 29, 1892
    [Discrimination against Italians]

    The Italians were made the recipients of very insulting terms by Judge Baldwin at a public Democratic rally in the Standard Theater, Milwaukee. He had the vulgar impudence to use the terms lousy and unwanted when speaking of the Italian voter. This rascally shyster judge should know that the Italians are many times superior in culture, history and patriotism, to him and the rest of the Irish knaves.

    The Italians are not lousy as he terms them, but rather, hard workers who at the cost of their lives have helped to build the American railways and to dig the mineral wealth of America. It is only during elections for public office that these ill-bred knaves accept the Italian as an equal, so that he may vote for the rotten Irish, who when arrived in power, insult our co-nationals or vilely massacre them as in New Orleans on the 14th day of March, 1891. Italians, don't allow yourselves to be deceived, cast aside the Democratic lists, toss them into the gutter which is the proper place for them. They 2represent the most rascally and odious element that insults the Italian, the element that is mainly Irish.

    To our friends who in good faith are members of the Democratic Party, we say: Remember the 14th of March, 1891, and the cowardly and vile words of Judge Baldwin who called us lousy.

    The Italians were made the recipients of very insulting terms by Judge Baldwin at a public Democratic rally in the Standard Theater, Milwaukee. He had the vulgar impudence to use ...

    Italian
    I C, I F 1
  • L'italia -- January 21, 1893
    False Arrest

    Because he had injustifiably beaten Stefano Albertini when the latter had drawn a gun on him in his room over the Roma Restaurant, 386 Jackson St., Clark, a Pinkerton service watchman, was fined $25.00 in court today.

    While asleep in his room over the restaurant, Albertini was awakened by a noise at the front door, at 4 o'clock in the morning, December 25th. Thinking that thieves were breaking into the restaurant, he picked up a revolver and made his way in the dark to the head of the stairs. The street door had been forced open and in the dim light he saw two men ascending the stairs. He levelled the gun at them before he recognized their uniform, that of the Pinkerton Service. The two men took the gun away from Albertini and forced him to accompany them to the quarters of the Service where, while awaiting the arrival of the police patrol which had been summoned by one of them, they mercilessly beat upon Albertini. The arrival of the patrol wagon was 2really a Godsend for Albertini.

    In court the next day when asked to explain their presence in the restaurant at that hour of the morning, they gave the excuse that they had found the front door open and having gone in to investigate the possibility of a robbery, they had run into Albertini threatening them with a gun. Thinking that Albertini, who has the room over the restaurant with the proprietor's permission, and is there also for the purpose of keeping watch over the place at night, was the one who had broken into the place, they had valiantly disarmed and hauled him to jail.

    The proprietor of the Roma, and the many friends of Albertini attested to the man's good character, so the Judge freed him and fined Clark, the leader of the two Pinkerton men, $25.00.

    Had the positions been reversed, I wonder if Albertini would have gotten out of it with a $25.00 fine.

    Because he had injustifiably beaten Stefano Albertini when the latter had drawn a gun on him in his room over the Roma Restaurant, 386 Jackson St., Clark, a Pinkerton service ...

    Italian
    II E 2, II A 2, I C