The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • L'italia -- January 15, 1887
    A Benefit Concert for the Italian Church

    The Most Reverend Fathers Moretti & Compagina gave a concert for the benfit of the Italian Church at "Uhlich's Hall". The big hall was full of both men and women, many of whom were representatives of social parties of the colony. These societies are considering the opening of an Italian school similar to the school in New York which is under the direction of Father Mazziotta.

    The Most Reverend Fathers Moretti & Compagina gave a concert for the benfit of the Italian Church at "Uhlich's Hall". The big hall was full of both men and women, ...

    Italian
    II B 1 a, I A 2 a, III B 2, III C
  • L'italia -- October 01, 1892
    Catholic Schools, Not Governmental Schools

    Not long ago a telegram reached here saying that a certain Mr. Satolli was to organize Italian Schools under the Italian government. His name is not Mr. Satolli, but Monsignor Satolli, and he is sent by Pope Leo XIII to Chicago to organize the Catholic Schools according to the Roman system, but not in the Italian language. The schools will teach in English.

    Not long ago a telegram reached here saying that a certain Mr. Satolli was to organize Italian Schools under the Italian government. His name is not Mr. Satolli, but Monsignor ...

    Italian
    I A 2 a, III C, III H
  • L'italia -- August 05, 1899
    [New Italian School]

    The Italian School at Erie near Market St., under the auspices of the Assumption Church, will open the first of September.

    The building was constructed in six months, at a cost of $30,000.

    The Italian School at Erie near Market St., under the auspices of the Assumption Church, will open the first of September. The building was constructed in six months, at a ...

    Italian
    I A 2 a
  • La Tribuna Italiana -- July 09, 1904
    The New School of "Holy Mother"

    The Reverend Father, Don Antonio, professor and pastor of the Holy Mother Church, located at Peoria Street and Grand Avenue, notifies us that about five hundred pupils have registered at the school which he has opened at 150 Grand Avenue.

    The Italian language and literature, English, French, German, Spanish, Latin and Greek, History, Geography and Mathmatics are taught during the day, from 9 A.M. to 11 A.M., and 2:30 P.M., to 4:30 P.M., and in the evening from 7:30 P.M. to 9:30 P.M.

    The Reverend Father, Don Antonio, professor and pastor of the Holy Mother Church, located at Peoria Street and Grand Avenue, notifies us that about five hundred pupils have registered at ...

    Italian
    I A 2 a, I A 2 b, III C
  • La Tribuna Italiana -- September 09, 1906
    In Regard to Parochial Schools

    Two hundred and forty-five thousand children will attend the Chicago Public Schools when they open on September 5, and 85,000 will attend the parochial schools.

    The 800 children in the Italian school on Erie Street, are being taught in every manner to hate their country by means of such speeches as a certain priest made during the Jubilee of Leo XIII.

    Italians, send your children to public schools. Religion should be taught in your home in the sanctuary of your family.

    Two hundred and forty-five thousand children will attend the Chicago Public Schools when they open on September 5, and 85,000 will attend the parochial schools. The 800 children in the ...

    Italian
    I A 1 a, I A 2 a, III H, III C
  • L'italia -- October 03, 1910
    The Italian School of the Church of the Guardian Angel

    The inauguration of the new Italian school of the Church of the Guardian Angel will be held today at 3:30.

    This generous and patriotic effort was made possible by Rev. Dott Ciufoletti, priest of that church, who, with the solidarity of the other fathers, has achieved this great and beneficial work.

    There will be present at the inauguration the Italian Royal Vice Consul G. Dall Agnol; the scholastic authorities, and other associations. This festival will be followed with a series of banquets each hour beginning from 5 p. m. to 9 p. m. in the basement of the school. At the ceremony and banquet, distinguished personalities will speak on the great work done by the Catholic churches in the United States, and the marvelous perservance displayed by Rev. Ciufoletti, in providing the Italians of the West Side with an Italian school.

    The inauguration of the new Italian school of the Church of the Guardian Angel will be held today at 3:30. This generous and patriotic effort was made possible by Rev. ...

    Italian
    I A 2 a
  • L'italia -- October 07, 1911
    [Miss Bartolomei to Teach at De Paul]

    Miss Consiglia Bastolomei was appointed teacher of the Italian Language at De Paul University.

    Last year Miss Bastolomei taught the same language at Lewis Institute, on Robey and Madison Streets.

    Rev. H. I. McCabe, O. M., is the President of the De Paul University.

    Miss Consiglia Bastolomei was appointed teacher of the Italian Language at De Paul University. Last year Miss Bastolomei taught the same language at Lewis Institute, on Robey and Madison Streets. ...

    Italian
    II A 1, I A 2 a, I K
  • La Parola dei Socialisti -- January 03, 1914
    To the Italians of Chicago

    Until to-day we believed that Mr. Bolognesi was the best and most independent man ever placed at the head of the Italian Consulate in Chicago. Until to-day we believed him to be (after his repeated assertions), politically neutral, without any preferences of personal political ideas.

    But to-day, we do not believe so. His diplomatic tact has failed him and he openly reveals himself to us and to the intelligent part of our colony as a real papist and clerical.

    None of us would contest his right to open a shelter to provide beds and meals for the unfortunate in distress, who have been thrown in the street by unemployment these past months, unemployment caused by a social system which the Consul defends officially and privately.

    The right which we strongly contest is that of entrusting this new benevolent institution to the Sisters of the Sacred Heart. We contest his right to use the Italian government's money, money of the people, to protect (under the appearance of beneficence) his own clerical ideals.

    2

    We contest his right to give Rome the impression that in Chicago it is possible to help the poor people only through the interference of priests, monks, or nuns.

    We question the validity of the opinion that people believe that what he has done was the only thing that could be done.

    Mr. Bolognesi never has openly revealed his views on public welfare, except to a few persons to whom he has expressed himself privately. And now, after an accomplished deed, he announces in the newspapers that starving Italians may have, from now on, a bowl of soup-thanks to consular-monastic charity.

    How can Mr. Bolognesi say that no other way was open to him? Was it not an insult to the other existing beneficent institutions of our colony that he completely ignored them? But he has clerical sympathies and so he chose the only way possible.

    Our clever Consul is perfectly free to be clerical as long as he wishes; but the most independent and intelligent Italians of Chicago will not overlook 3that provocation, and will oppose such policies with an energetic anti-clerical movement.

    Our objection is not that we do not attribute the right importance to the new institution as such, but that several hundred dollars of the Italian government's money, obtained by the witty diplomatic clericalism of Mr. Bolognesi, will be used for Catholic propaganda through the medium of a bowl of soup.

    We stand for the principle of the thing, but we rightfully maintain that it is time for the representative of Italy to stop using the money of the Italian government to give help to the Catholic Church, the defrauder of our colonies.

    The time has arrived for anti-clerical Italians to arouse themselves, organize and fight.

    The impurity of the Catholic influx to this country is becoming more insufferable and repugnant. Its everlasting insincerity is that it operates not for the good but for the purpose of extending its pestilential influence.

    4

    As an example, consider the activities here in America of the Catholic Church in establishing grammar schools in opposition to the [secular] public schools. It is certainly admirable to teach children; however, the priests perform that task not for the good of it, but as a chance for propaganda. And this our priests, in their Italo-American schools, are anti-Italians for the original sin, and anti-Americans for their daily acts.

    Take notice of them in their hospitals and orphanages, in their welfare institutions; they always use the same deceitful hypocrisy. In one hand a piece of bread, and in the other hand the Crucifix; and before you can bite the piece of bread, you must kiss the Crucifix. Beautiful sentiment of charity! Was that the teaching of Christ?

    It is better to starve than to bite the bait on the hook as the fish do. This is the way the free thinkers of our colony are thinking and they will try to expend all their energies to denounce the ignoble and everlasting trickery of the priests and nuns.

    Until to-day we believed that Mr. Bolognesi was the best and most independent man ever placed at the head of the Italian Consulate in Chicago. Until to-day we believed him ...

    Italian
    III H, I A 2 a, I D 2 c, II D 10, II D 3, II D 4, III C, I E, IV
  • L'italia -- June 20, 1920
    An Italian Woman Lawyer

    Miss Elena Cirese, twenty years old, living at 533 N. Cuyler Ave., in Oak Park, has obtained a law diploma from De Paul University. To practice her profession, Miss Cirese must wait one more year to reach the legal age.

    Congratulations.

    Miss Elena Cirese, twenty years old, living at 533 N. Cuyler Ave., in Oak Park, has obtained a law diploma from De Paul University. To practice her profession, Miss Cirese ...

    Italian
    II A 1, I A 2 a, I K
  • La Fiamma -- November 01, 1923
    The Non-Americanization of Immigrants An Answer to Elizabeth Fracer's Article in the Saturday Evening Post

    Whoever read the article in The Saturday Evening Post, Aug. 14th, 1923, entitled:

    "Our Foreign Cities-Chicago." by Elizabeth Frazer, certainly received a most deplorable impression of European immigrants, especially of the Italians, in the United States, because the authoress interests herself, particularly, in the lowest class of emigrant and sets forth its deficiencies and misery only. Her information, no doubt, came from one of the many insignificant labor agencies, whose chief are notoriously known as unscrupulous merchants in human flesh, and are not in a position to give just information regarding immigrants in general. On the other hand, 2the authoress omits mentioning the good qualities of the immigrants and entirely disregards the better element which European emigration particularly the Italian, has brought to America.

    A conscientious writer ought to set forth not only the "cons" but also the "pros," that is to say, the favorable as well as the unfavorable, especially when subjects of such vital social importance are concerned. Otherwise the reader only sees one side of the truth, (if the truth exists in Elizabeth Frazer's article), and it is upon this one and only side that he bases his opinion on the subject discussed by a careless and unjust writer.

    Elizabeth Frazer treats her subject in such a pessimistic way that she came to the conclusion, that immigrants, the Italian in particular, are absolutely unsusceptible to Americanization and to the assimilation. Consequently, in her conclusion she does not recognize in the immigrant in this country even the natural instinct of an animal towards its own betterment.

    3

    I believe I know the Italian immigrants of the United States well enough, having studied their situation for a long time and having published a book covering my impressions entitled: "The Journal of the Italian Immigrant in North America," (Chicago), therefore, I venture to set forth a few facts quite contrary to the foolish, misleading and slanderous assertions of Elizabeth Frazer.

    For instance, there are hundreds of thousands of Italians in the United States who are naturalized American citizens.

    In agriculture, the industries, in commerce, fiance, politics, sport, science, art and education, in fact, in all fields of American activity, the Italian immigrants have demonstrated in the past, and will demonstrate more and more, that they know how to Americanize themselves and assimilate to the fullest extent that which America offers them.

    Furthermore, the immigrants of today are not like the ones of the old days, to whom, no doubt, Elizabeth Frazer refers with such posthumus zeal.

    4

    Immigration: The American Commissioner of Immigration at Ellis Island is an Italian, Mr. Caminetti, who has held the office for years.

    Labor: The members of the American labor organizations are a good part Italians.

    Agriculture: The vineyards, the orange and lemon orchards, the very finest of their kind in this country, were grown and developed to their present state by Italian immigrants and are in their hands.

    Industries: The Boston fisheries, considered among the most important in the United States, were established and developed to their present flourishing state by Italian immigrants and are in their hands.

    Commerce: South Water Street of Chicago, one of the wonders of Chicago and the most important wholesale fruit market in the United States, was established and developed to its present state by Italian immigrants and it is almost entirely in their hands. An Italian immigrant, Mr. Garibaldi, was for years and up to his death, President of the South Water Street wholesale merchants organization.

    5

    Among the high grade confectioners in Chicago, the Allegretti Co., has enjoyed a splendid reputation for years.

    Finance: The greatest American Bank of the West from Chicago to California, is the Bank of Italy in San Francisco, established and developed to its present state by Italian immigrants and that bank is in their hands. This bank has numerous branches, among them the New York branch, which rivals the greatest banks of that city.

    The Italians, Conte Minotto, is Vice-President of the Boulevard Bridge Bank in Chicago.

    Politics: The President of the City Council of New York is the Italian, Fiorello La Guardia, who was also candidate for Mayor of New York during the last election.

    The District Attorney of New York City is the Italian, Mr. Pecora. A State Senator of New York is the Italian, Mr. Cotillo.

    6

    Among the Judges in Chicago there are three Italians, Barasa, Borelli, Gualano. Judge Barasa was also candidate for Mayor of Chicago during the last election. And in smaller American cities some of the Mayors are Italian.

    Science: The only American Pasteur Institute in Chicago is the one established and directed by the Italian, Dr. Lagorio. One of the best American hospitals in Chicago is the Columbus Hospital facing Lincoln Park, established and owned by Italians. The Italian, John B. Zingrone of Chicago is one of the greatest American X-ray operators. He was confidential assistant to the famous surgeon, Prof. J. B. Murphy, who appointed him to make the X-ray pictures of President Theodore Roosevelt.

    Art: The Italian, Count di Cesnola, was for years, up to his death, the Director of the Metropolitan Museum of New York. The two greatest American opera companies are in the hands of Italians, i.e., the New York Opera Company being directed by the Italian, Gatticasazza, and the Chicago Opera Company by the Italian, Maestro Polacco. Among the best American moving picture stars is 7the Italian, Rudolfo Valentino. There are many others. Not counting the myriads of American singers, music teachers, architects, sculptors, artists, who are of Italian blood. The architect of the Union Station of Chicago, now under construction and said to be the greatest railroad station in the world, is an Italian. The American inventor of artificial lightning is the Italian engineer, Mr. Faccioli.

    Professions: There are hundreds of Italians, naturalized American citizens, who are practicing law, hundreds of physicians as well as druggists.

    Sports: The American Golf champion is the Italian, Sarazene. The American champion of automobile racing is the Italian, De Palma. Among the American ring champions are the Italians, Dundee, Wilson, Gennaro and even Dempsey, who is of Italian descent.

    The American cowboy winner of the recent horse races at Harlem, New York, is the Italian, Tony Pagona. In swimming, running, bicycling and motorcycle racing, 8some of the best champions are Italians.

    Hygiene: Several of the finest residences in choice sections of Chicago are occupied by Italian millionaires like Cuneo, Costa, Garibaldi, Dr. Lagorio.

    Education: One of the greatest American educators is the Italian, Angelo Patri, not counting the numerous Catholic American educational institutions, (universities, colleges, high schools), in all parts of the United States, almost all established and directed by Italians. Dozens of professors in the American universities and colleges are Italians.

    In the high school examinations in New York City, two Italian boys, Bernard and Vincent Cioffari, exceeded by 5.03 and 3.77, respectively, the very highest average (92%) ever attained by anyone in the history of New York schools.

    I could mention many other facts to prove that the Italian immigrants desire and 9know how to Americanize themselves, that they desire and know how to assimilate the best America has to offer them by securing for themselves American positions of such importance, and in every field imaginable, as to be envied by those Americans whose individuality Elizabeth Frazer so highly praises. Such positions are attained by Italian immigrants notwithstanding the disadvantages they suffer due to the difference in language and, more than anything else, to the cruel prejudice held against them, such as those found in the lines of Elizabeth Frazer's article.

    However, I still want to call attention to the many marriages between high class Americans and Italians in America, which naturally indicates that Italian immigrants do become naturalized American citizens, and, that they assimilate the good America offers to them.

    In addition, there is not an Italian newspaper in the United States, that does not continually preach to Italian immigrants the Gospel of Americanization.

    10

    At any rate, if the Italian quarters of any city lack cleanliness the fault lies particularly with the American health authorities who neglect such quarters and do not enforce, with the necessary vigor, the observance of the laws covering public hygiene.

    One should not entirely condemn the ignorant, the humble, the poor, and insist that they should spontaneously uplift themselves. Instead, the learned and the rich, who generally neglect the ignorant and the poor, should extend to them a helping hand in order to uplift them to a higher standard of living. This ought to be the mission of real civilization.

    This is the most sacred and most beautiful mission that America has to accomplish, since she believes herself, nowadays, to be the leading Nation of the world.

    Whoever read the article in The Saturday Evening Post, Aug. 14th, 1923, entitled: "Our Foreign Cities-Chicago." by Elizabeth Frazer, certainly received a most deplorable impression of European immigrants, especially of ...

    Italian
    III A, II B 2 d 1, II A 3 b, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, II A 1, II A 2, II D 3, III G, I C, I L, I M, IV