The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 21, 1919
    "Prince Bob"

    On March 8, the Chicago-Hungarians were given a second chance to enjoy the grand operetta, "Prince Bob." The performance was given for the benefit of that grand Hungarian-American, Paul Borak, who, for the past fifteen years, has worked hard for the preservation of one of the most cultural societies in Chicago, the Chicago Independent Song Society.

    Of this performance, we are glad to state that it was performed better this time than it was before by this group of players. The outstanding actors who took part in this operetta were as follows: Michael Redey, a former member of the Budapest opera company, and Miss Irma Petrovics, former Hungarian actress. The performance of Mr. Redey was superb. But we think it necessary to say that his performance put real life into the performance of this operetta. He acted so well that when he appeared on the scene we forgot that it was merely an act, and not a true life happening. This is not taking anything away from the performance 2of the other actors, who all performed in the finest way possible.

    The staging of the operetta was, both financially and culturally speaking, a huge success.

    At this time, the Hungarian University Club presented Paul Berak with a beautiful silver sword, and the Chicago Independent Song Society honored him by presenting him with a beautiful silver wreath for the work he has done for the preservation of this organization.

    On March 8, the Chicago-Hungarians were given a second chance to enjoy the grand operetta, "Prince Bob." The performance was given for the benefit of that grand Hungarian-American, Paul Borak, ...

    Hungarian
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a, III H, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 06, 1919
    Peoples' Meeting a Success

    The Chicago-Hungarian Societies' committee held an open meeting for the Chicago-Hungarians Sunday afternoon at Wicker Park Hall.

    When the roll was called it was found that there were fourteen societies represented, although the larger part of the audience consisted of members of the I.W.W., the Social Labor Party, and the Social Party Association. The meeting was opened by Mr. Joseph Szoke, a fellow worker, who gave a short but very interesting talk. He spoke about the duty of American-Hungarian workers towards this country, at the same time reminding them of the causes that made them leave their homeland to seek their daily bread in a foreign country. Then Mr. Szoke, asked Mr. Armin Lowy to speak. He, too, spoke about the new Hungary, the bare constitutional routine of Hungary, an analyzed the causes of the War.

    2

    At the conclusion of the speeches, the chorus representing the Social Party sang the Hymn of Revolution. All pending resolutions were read next and were accepted unanimously. After this, Ernest Klopstein delivered a masterful speech, in which he asked the Hungarian-American workers to start organizational work, showing clearly that a well organized group would be able to protect itself. Mr. Klopstein told his audience that it was impossible to accomplish any of their aims by fighting for them in the streets, but we reach our goal by working like the machines of industry. We must organize and work together.

    This last speech caused a slight disturbance among the societies, and quite a few arguments were started, pro and con. In order to quell the arguments, the meeting was called to order and then adjourned in order.

    The Chicago-Hungarian Societies' committee held an open meeting for the Chicago-Hungarians Sunday afternoon at Wicker Park Hall. When the roll was called it was found that there were fourteen societies ...

    Hungarian
    I E, III A, III H, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- June 27, 1919
    Severe Restrictions

    The present congressional session will place some very severe restrictions, and enact laws with reference to immigration. This is being done in order to keep undesirables out of this country. They will also enact laws which will give sufficient power to the government to deport those undesirables who have succeeded in coming into this country.

    This resolution was brought before the House by Albert Johnson, who is the chairman of the committee on immigration.

    With reference to the more recent radical disturbances and bombings, this resolution will be passed by the House in record time. The committee on immigration will have this bill up for consideration next Wednesday.

    2

    The fundamental points of this bill are as follows:

    1. To suspend immigration for the next two years.

    2. A thorough investigation of the immigrants who are now living in the United States.

    3. The deportation of those people who neglected getting their first papers in order that they might be free from enlisting for duty in the American Army.

    4. The deportation of all aliens who have records as blackmailers, all those who teach or are practicing the ideas of communism, or are members of an organization practicing or teaching anti- 3Americanism.

    5. To allow immigrants only a temporary stay in this country, and grant a permanent stay only after a thorough investigation.

    6. To enact severe restrictions with reference to the registration of all sailors, or boat hands, and a severe penalty on those steamship lines who fail to live up to this restriction.

    These restrictions will enable the United States to get acquainted with all information concerning the immigrant.

    This bill would require everyone to register upon entering the United States, present a photograph and be fingerprinted. The registration and photography would be compulsory each year after entering the United 4States.

    The two-year restriction on immigration will be modified so that those people who have relatives in foreign countries can make arrangements to have them brought to this country.

    It is to be remembered that immigrants, who after investigation prove undesirable, must be deported immediately.

    The present congressional session will place some very severe restrictions, and enact laws with reference to immigration. This is being done in order to keep undesirables out of this country. ...

    Hungarian
    III G, III H, I E
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 12, 1919
    Good News for Chicago Hungarians.

    We wish to announce, through the columns of this newspaper, that it is possible to communicate with Hungary through the mails.

    What this means to the Hungarian people is needless to discuss. We have talked and thought enough about it already.

    This is a piece of news that has been awaited very patiently; the oceans have opened in front of us. Now we can open communications and we have won the first item of our fight. Now we can see that something is happening for the benefit of the Hungarian people, and our patient waiting will have come to an end. Now idle talk is not necessary and the guessing game that people have conducted can be stopped. It does not make much difference when people can be assured of going to Hungary in safety.

    The main thing is that the Hungarian people can receive and send mail to and from Hungary, and within a short time all Hungarians will know just exactly what is happening in their homeland.

    2

    This newspaper has always said that the mail channels have to be opened before any other type of transportation or communication can be hoped for by the Hungarian people.

    We have always maintained that until the mail is opened to all parts of Hungary, all other activities in relation to the homeland are futile.

    Now we can speak with more confidence of the future. How people may have popes that in a few months, those who want to return to Hungary may be able to do so. Those people who want to return to Hungary will know just as soon as they receive their first letter, whether it is worth taking a chance. The people who are planning to emigrate can start buying presents for their relatives, because we feel that in a few months all the channels of travel will be open.

    3

    Besides the sending and receiving of letters, it is permissible to send money and packages to Hungary. Whether it is advisable to send money to Hungary is open to question. Prices in Hungary are terribly high and out of all proportion, for instance, a pair of chickens in American money would cost the buyer $24; a goose, $36 and the price of clothing is beyond belief.

    The sending of money would not mean very much, but to send packages containing clothing would be of much greater help. The time has come when these questions must be given serious thought by the Hungarian people.

    The motto of all good Hungarians must be this; "We will send more letters and packages to our loved ones."

    The Chicago Hungarians can do much for the Hungarian nation. This downtrodden and broken-hearted, but still spirited people, need food and decent clothing. Now that winter is closing in fast, we would advise those who plan on sending clothing to their people in Hungary, to send winter clothing, at once.

    We wish to announce, through the columns of this newspaper, that it is possible to communicate with Hungary through the mails. What this means to the Hungarian people is needless ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 17, 1919
    Duties of Hungarian American Societies

    To prevent the starvation of countless Hungarian children of Europe the first thing we must do is to start organizing a relief movement. To start a movement of this kind is not an easy task. It is true that these movements to be successful must be started by established organizations. Usually when such movements are started by society circles and various organizations it gradually envelopes all the Hungarians.

    Regardless of how charitable the Hungarian people are, the results will not be staisfactory if the inspiration and all the hard work is left to the newspapers to conduct, while the leaders of Hungarian societies disregard the fate of the poor people suffering in Hungary. The Hungarian churches should also lend a hand in helping the starving Hungarian children.

    2

    Religious organizations should hold this as one of their principal charities and should not be afraid of the hard work that is involved.

    In many cities individual societies have already started this work, and according to information received they have had splendid results.

    The Hungarian Reformed Federation has donated $5,000 for this cause. We must look at the organization with deepest gratitude for this worthy donation. We must admit that this organization has done its duty in aiding the unfortunate people of Hungary.

    If other societies follow the lead of the Hungarian Reformed Federation, even if their donation is not quite as large, they will be setting an example for all Hungarians. Then we can rest assured that Hungarians across the ocean, who are in great need, will get relief which they 3will greatly appreciate.

    The leaders of societies should not forget this newest duty. Each and every society should consider this subject and plan to send aid to the starving Hungarian children. This should be done at once.

    We can not imagine a single Hungarian society that will not do its bit for such a worthy cause.

    We know what faithful hearts the Hungarian-American possess. We feel sure that the starving Hungarian children will soon learn about and profit from this generous spirit.

    To prevent the starvation of countless Hungarian children of Europe the first thing we must do is to start organizing a relief movement. To start a movement of this kind ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III B 2, III H, III C
  • Magyar Tribune -- November 14, 1919
    What Is the Matter with the Hungarians of Chicago? (Editorial)

    During the last few weeks we have been writing articles concerning starvation among Hungarians in Europe. We have tried to arouse the feeling of the Chicago-Hungarians in every way possible. We have employed all the editorial schemes a newspaper is permitted to use in order to picture the terrible conditions abroad, and have explained the methods to relieve the conditions. To a certain extent, we have been successful. We have heard from a number of patriotic Hungarians who are willing to do their part in this behalf. We are trying to organize a society that will be in harmony with and conform to its ideals as has been done in other cities. At this time we are about ready to launch such an organization. Information has come to us that even those Hungarians who are not numbered among our readers have advised us of their intention 2to help feed the thousands of little children in Hungary in order that they may be saved. This fact has given us great encouragement. There is, however, one discouraging feature connected with this worthy movement. These prospective helpers will support our society providing we concede to some of their wishes. If they can be the leaders and we are the followers, if we are the contributors, and they are the donors, then all will be well. These people have been connected with organizations of this kind before, but this being a free and democratic country, and the majority of Hungarians being a democratic and freedom-loving people, such organizations have always failed.

    These self-styled leaders may think what ever they please of our group as a class. Today, this class is not a bunch of sheep following a bellwether. We are very particular whom we follow and whom we choose 3to represent us, and, in our opinion, this class of people has always been the backbone of all Hungarian organizations.

    As we understand it, the heart of every Hungarian has been deeply touched by the plight of those starving Hungarian children, but his heart will respond only if he can be the collector, if he can be the leader, if he can be the boss, and we, the working Hungarians become the contributors, and his obedient servants.

    Let us say right here and now that we have no objections to the character, integrity and ability of Mr. Joseph Byfield and to his associates. They may be conscientious men. We are glad to have them associated with us and take an interest in the affairs of the Hungarian community. But we do 4object to the un-American methods Mr. Byfield and his associates are using to obtain leadership and control of legitimate Hungarian movements in Chicago. We want to remind our readers that it was Mr. Byfield and his friends who took charge of The Hungarian Patriotic Association which, after operating a short time, was forced to disband. "Too many midwives, and the baby will die," says an old Hungarian proverb. There are no successful organizations in which everyone is a leader, but Mr. Byfield and his friends want to be nothing short of officials in all Hungarian movements. We sincerely admire their ambitions!

    It is quite an honor to be a leader of such a noble race as the Hungarians. We admire these men because they wish to be affiliated with our race, despite 5the fact these men rank very high socially in American society. What hurts us is that when these distinguished Hungarian gentlemen become heads or are officers of our organizations, about 45,000 Hungarians in Chicago become estranged from that very movement. This is not our personal opinion, but are the facts obtained from past experiences which have led us to form this deplorable conclusion and honest conviction.

    Our interest in this movement, as well as in any Hungarian movement, which will benefit the Hungarians of Chicago, is impartial. We feel that it is our duty as public servants to voice our opinion against these cliques whose methods are of a disadvantage to Hungarian traditions and public life.

    We hope Mr. Byfield and his friends have the 100,000 distressed Hungarian children in mind rather than the publicity that they might get out of the 6movement. We want them to be generous this time, not for our sake, not for the sake of democracy, but for the sake of the future Hungarian generation, whose fate rests with all of us.

    Let the Hungarian people of Chicago elect leaders whom they believe will lead them to the greatest success. We feel that the Chicago-Hungarians are intelligent enough to pick desirable and worthy men and women as their representatives.

    This has been done in all cities and localities where Hungarians live. If this is done the right way, the work and the responsibility is shouldered equally by all. We believe that every one is aware of the fact that we live in a democratic country, and so we want to follow the principles of 7that form of government.

    We hope that no one is offended by this article, that is not our intention. We also hope that it will not close the pocketbooks of those who are willing and able to contribute towards this noble cause. We repeat, we are ready to support this movement with all our power, but we do not want to sacrifice the great principle for which we have been fighting so earnestly and that which almost upset the whole world in the past five years. That great principle is this; no one has a monopoly over the Hungarians. No one can dictate to us. The people have their rights and we are for the rights of the people.

    Let the people Rule!

    During the last few weeks we have been writing articles concerning starvation among Hungarians in Europe. We have tried to arouse the feeling of the Chicago-Hungarians in every way possible. ...

    Hungarian
    I C, II D 10, III H, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- November 21, 1919
    Contributions Started

    Last Friday night, in the Italian Room at the Sherman Hotel, a meeting was held by the American Relief Committee for the Hungarian sufferers. Many of the members pledged special donations. The following are people who not only pledged to donate, but who also made their contributions:

    Joseph Byfield $2,000.00
    Frank Benko $400.00
    Mme. Marie Young $100.00
    L. Kaufman $150.00
    Jack Lait $50.00

    With the above information we also received a letter from the president of the committee which reads as follows:

    2

    Nov. 15, 1919.

    Mr. Martin Benedek;

    2207 Clybourn Ave.,

    Chicago, Ill.

    My dear Sir:

    I note with pleasure in the Magyar Tribune, of November 14, that you take a deep interest in the movement of which I have become the head. I am confident your action will be of great benefit to the movement which you admit to be a worthy one. I hope you will continue to lend us your support.

    Every donation will be recorded even those as small as twenty-five cents.

    3

    The money, as you know, will be sent from here to the American committee in New York, headed by Mr. Herbert Hoover, 115 Broadway.

    Should any of your subscribers desire to send funds direct to this committee we will be very happy to receive them.

    We have only one object in view, and that is to help the children in the country of our birth.

    Thanking you for your courtesy, I remain,

    Very sincerely yours,

    Joseph Byfield.

    4

    We are very glad to publish this letter, and we will be very glad to publish the names of those who may make their contributions to this worthy cause later. Regardless of our dispositions towards the leaders of this movement, we shall not oppose their actions because we consider the object of easing conditions among these starving children to be a worthy cause, and we are happy to support it. We hope that millions of dollars may be collected in Chicago for this cause.

    Last Friday night, in the Italian Room at the Sherman Hotel, a meeting was held by the American Relief Committee for the Hungarian sufferers. Many of the members pledged special ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H, I G, IV
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 19, 1920
    A Successful Evening of Entertainment

    The Chicago Hungarian Independent Charitable Society sponsored an evening of entertainment on January 10, for the benefit of the starving Hungarian children in Europe. Crystal Hall, where the affair took place, was filled to capacity. The most important part of the event was that it proved to be a success. The starving children of Hungary will receive $150, the proceeds derived from this entertainment.

    We take the opportunity to extend our thanks to all who aided in this work. The members of this organization are being congratulated for the fine work they are doing to promote such a worthy cause, the fruits of which proved so successful.

    The Chicago Hungarian Independent Charitable Society sponsored an evening of entertainment on January 10, for the benefit of the starving Hungarian children in Europe. Crystal Hall, where the affair took ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H, III B 2, II B 1 c 3
  • Magyar Tribune -- February 13, 1920
    Charity Ball

    The Chicago Independent Song Society is working hard in order to promote a masquerade ball. This ball will take place on February 28, at the Schoenhofen Hall, Milwaukee and Ashland Avenues. The entertainment committee is sparing no efforts in making this affair a success. In this particular instance, it is very important that this event be a success, due to the fact that fifty per cent of the proceeds are to be turned over for food and clothing for starving Hungarian children. With this idea in mind, each member is desirous of giving his unselfish support to the affair.

    It is hoped that every loyal Hungarian be present at this ball. Besides having a good time at this affair, it is a worthy contribution. There will be prizes awarded to those wearing the most representative costumes, and dance contests will be conducted also.

    The Chicago Independent Song Society is working hard in order to promote a masquerade ball. This ball will take place on February 28, at the Schoenhofen Hall, Milwaukee and Ashland ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H, II B 1 a, III B 2
  • Magyar Tribune -- February 13, 1920
    A Notice to Hungarian-Americans

    This article is written with reference to the activities of the American Relief Committee for Hungarian sufferers.

    This committee has reached a point where they think it is necessary to start activities among the entire Hungarian population of the United States in order that sufficient aid may be obtained for the children of Hungary, and to prevent their destruction. In the first 2place this affair strictly concerns all Hungarians. Those starving children in Hungary are Hungarians. To whom can these unfortunate children turn, or whom can they ask, if not the Hungarians-Americans who are able to help lighten the burden of suffering in our homeland?

    The Hungarians in the United States know that many months passed before the Hoover Committee listened to their pleas. Finally, this committee not only granted the pleas of the Hungarians, but also helped them obtain permission to communicate with and to aid their loved ones.

    3

    The time came, and no sooner did activities begin, than the first large contribution from this country reached Hungary. Today, there are 180 kitchens in Hungary advertising the activities of the Relief Committee. The children in 103 schools and 17 hospitals wish to express their gratitude for the contributions made by the generous Hungarians of America.

    In order that the Hungarian-Americans might be organized properly to conduct this charitable work, we have appointed Rev. Endre Szilagyi to take charge of it. He has just returned from Europe and fully 4understands the serious conditions that exist in Hungary. He will not only answer inquiries concerning these charitable activities, but will give advice in the matter of conducting them, so that to this end, the greatest good may be done and thus bring honor to the Hungarians.

    Reverend Szilagyi is ready to aid all Hungarian societies or church organizations in the promotion of this work. He is also willing to attend meetings and speak in both Hungarian and English in order to further this cause.

    As we mentioned previously, there are 180 kitchens, 103 schools, and 517 hospitals receiving benefits, from this charitable movement. It gives aid to 61,000 children in Hungary. The committee has gone one step further. It is now supplying food and plans to supply clothing soon. In a few weeks we will hear the good news that the good American Samaritan has clothed 10,000 Hungarian children. To date, contributions have reached the $300,000 mark. Of this amount, the Hoover Committee has turned over $259,000 to Budapest authorities, and at the present time they have $29,500 on hand.

    In order that this movement be a complete success, it is hoped that the contributions will reach the million dollar mark.

    6

    At the present time, the Hungarian-Americans have taken very little part in this movement, which should be their own. The Hungarians have always been known as a proud people. They would never accept help from a stranger. Today, when we have to save the future generation, we are letting strangers take care of this very important matter. Perhaps our Hungarian pride is dying.

    Let us organize and contribute. Those suffering children will remember that these contributions saved their lives. We must help them, and our names will be blessed. The entire Hungarian population must stand together, and become a mother, who lovingly embraces her starving children, thereby saving their lives and the future of our homeland.

    This article is written with reference to the activities of the American Relief Committee for Hungarian sufferers. This committee has reached a point where they think it is necessary to ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, III H, I C, I G