The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- March 30, 1917
    Masses Acquire Citizenship

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become American citizens. In one and a half months time there were 10,914 first papers issued, and at the same time there were 1,952 second papers issued and thereby creating as many new citizens. Of the new citizens that were naturalized 80 per cent were Germans, Hungarians and Austrians.

    In the entire year of 1916 there were 13,766 first papers, and 7, 870 second papers issued.

    Since the first of February when the United States broke its diplomatic relationship with Germany, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of people who desire to become ...

    Hungarian
    III A, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 14, 1917
    Lectures in Chicago.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma.

    This organization passed a resolution at its last meeting to give instructions and advice to Hungarians, by means of lectures and readings, with reference to behavior in times of war. Thus they are trying to maintain that splendid reputation which the Hungarians have established in peace times among the American people. They are teaching Hungarians, who have become citizens, how to conduct themselves in reference to the war. Instructions will be given to those who wish to secure their naturalization papers, and also to those who have not as yet obtained their first papers. The latter will be taught what is expected of them, while the United States is at war.

    Likewise will advice be given to those who have surplus funds to invest, showing them how to place investments here, while such are barred in foreign countries.

    2

    The first lecture took place last Tuesday at Burnside; the next will be held in West Pullman. These lectures, apparently, meet with the approval of the Hungarians, because quite a number attended the last one.

    The Hungarian College Club, representing the highest classes of Hungarians in Chicago, has a very exclusive membership, for it requires, of members joining, a college diploma. This organization passed a ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, III A, I A 3, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- April 21, 1917
    The Ten Commandments for Immigrants in Time of War (Editorial)

    I

    You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and to save a few nickels for your old age.

    II

    When you stepped on the shore of the United States you were on free soil. No one asked you what you were doing here, and no one stood in your way. It was up to you and you only what you were going to do in this country. The nation immediately became your friend. You received the respect due to a guest when you entered the United States. Respect your host, and your host will respect you.

    2

    III

    Keep your thoughts to yourself. Maybe the pope knows everything, but you are not a pope, and this does not mean that you know more than he does.

    IV

    Do not get involved in any arguments in public places.

    V

    For six days do your work and attend to your duties. On the seventh day rest; that is what the Lord intended you to do. Six days out of the week are for labor, and during this time you should think of nothing but your duties. If you are engaged in respectable work, you will be considered a law-abiding citizen, so work for six days, and on the seventh day of the week devote your time to rest and to your family.

    3

    VI

    Do not take part in any political movement. Trust the people whose duty it is to think for you. Be satisfied, for you will not be able to change things anyway. In war unity means strength.

    VII

    Have respect for the laws of the country which provides your daily bread. The laws defend your interests. Every law has a purpose. You must be familiar with the laws, and you must obey them.

    VIII

    Do not carry on your person any kind of firearm or other deadly weapon. Your only weapon of defense should be your self-respect.

    4

    IX

    Keep your savings in the same place in which you had them in time of peace. Money should be kept in a bank and not on one's person or at the place where one lives. You yourself cannot guard your money so well as the bank can. The laws of this country insure that what is yours is yours only. Regardless of what the future may bring, your wealth will not be threatened by disaster in the United States.

    X

    Love your neighbor. All men are equal regardless of creed and nationality. We all came from the same parentage originally, and we are all brothers and sisters. After the World War will come brotherly love among the nations of the world. It is for this purpose that this country is fighting. No one asks you for sacrifice in this war; therefore you can lead a life of peace and happiness if you keep to the straight and narrow path.

    I You must never forget that no one asked you to come to the United States. You came here of your own free will to make a better living and ...

    Hungarian
    I G, III A
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 12, 1917
    The Chicago Hungarian League Steps Forward

    The editors of this paper are whole heartedly with the Hungarian League of Chicago, but,due to unforeseen circumstances, could not be represented at the last meeting of the league. We will, however, keep our readers informed through Stephen Hattala who writes to us about a certain resolution passed at the last meeting.

    Mr. Hattala writes to us as follows:

    At the meeting of the league referred to, the following resolution was passed: "The Chicago Hungarian League, consisting of chartered Hungarian Lodges and associations has found it necessary to step forward in defense of Hungarian American Citizens, both as individuals and as a group. It is our aim to prove that the Hungarian American citizen can perform all the duties of a good American citizen. The League, for this 2reason, plans a giant celebration for the Fourth of July or American Independence Day. The League plans to have all Hungarian church congregations invited as well as all members of Hungarian Lodges, to celebrate this great day together, In this way we Hungarians, as a body,can show that we are good citizens and that we intend to fulfill all requirements of good citizenship." Stephen Hattala was the author of this resolution. The various organizational representatives present accepted the resolution unanimously. They also decided to appoint a nine man committee,which will visit all Hungarian lodges, whether members of the league or not, and extend to them a cordial invitation to attend this celebration.

    At this meeting it was also decided that all Hungarian newspapers will be asked to give this celebration as much publicity as possible. The next meeting of the league will be held on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, May 13, 1917 at Schlitz Hall. The secretary of the league will send out invitations to the Hungarian organizations in Chicago and urge that the representatives of each and every organization make it their business to be present, in order that a very fine program may be worked out. The league wants every living Hungarian 3in Chicago and near vicinity to attend this giant demonstration of good American citizenship among the Hungarians. (Hattala)

    The editors of this paper are whole heartedly with the Hungarian League of Chicago, but,due to unforeseen circumstances, could not be represented at the last meeting of the league. We ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, III A, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 31, 1917
    Hungarian Summer School

    Rev. Endre Sebestyen Hungarian Reformed Minister wishes to announce that he intends to organize a Hungarian summer school. This school will be organized to serve those children residing in the more central part of Chicago.

    The summer school will be held during the months of July and August. The children will be taught to read, write and speak Hungarian. The parents who are interested in this organization of a Hungarian school will please communicate with the Rev. Sebestyen for additional information.

    Rev. Endre Sebestyen Hungarian Reformed Minister wishes to announce that he intends to organize a Hungarian summer school. This school will be organized to serve those children residing in the ...

    Hungarian
    II B 2 b, III C, III A
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 04, 1918
    What Our Duties Are Towards This Country

    It is very important that those of us who are living in this country realize that the nation which has provided a haven of freedom and has freed those who have been oppressed in other countries, shall be adequately protected. This nation unlike any other nation was organized by immigrants, and the Hungarians have taken a big part in the development of this nation.

    We must realize that conditions provided for the working man in this country are so much better than the conditions in other countries that they cannot be compared.

    This nation pays a fair wage to the worker. A machinist gets a very good wage, but so does the ordinary working man.

    Housing conditions are excellent. In Chicago the industries are much further advanced than in any other city in the world.

    2

    The industrialists are forever trying to improve conditions for the workers, both mentally and physically. The people that provide the work are forever striving to make life so much easier and more comfortable; they try to promote thrift among the workers. The industrialist has done a great deal to make life easier and finer for the workers. In other words, they want to prove to the worker that they are true friends.

    Those men working in industries located in Chicago and vicinity are almost considered as members of the family to whom the industry belongs.

    The employer always takes care of the worker who faithfully performs his duty. Those employees who stay faithful find no trouble in getting ahead.

    There,of course,is the worker who is never satisfied. He becomes a detriment to his fellow,worker and employer. He himself becomes a stumbling block in his path to success, and in time this man becomes a load for society to carry.

    3

    You should be loyal to this country. You should keep the interest of this country at heart; the interest of your employer is your interest. His success is yours and if you keep these things in mind you will be assured of work in these great United States.

    It is very important that those of us who are living in this country realize that the nation which has provided a haven of freedom and has freed those who ...

    Hungarian
    III A, I D 1 a, I J
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 04, 1918
    Why the Hungarian Worker Is Well Liked by America.

    There has never been a better opportunity to prove that the American people recognize the Hungarian workers. This is probably due to the conditions which exist between this country and Hungary. A question has been asked in the United States, what shall we do with the Hungarians? Shall they be dealt with the same as the Germans, or shall they be deported, as they are from most countries, who are citizens of a foreign country? This powerfully organized country has recognized the love, loyalty and liberal mindedness of the Hungarians who have become voluntary citizens of this country.

    The United States government has recognized these facts. President Wilson, instead of recognizing the Hungarians as hostile foreigners, as usual, in time of war, has put his arms around them and assured them that within the United States they may walk as free men. They shall have the same opportunities for employment that they have had. They shall have the same rights 2within the law that they have had.

    The Hungarian people have never denied their love for Hungary. This country never asked them to deny their love for the country of their birth. All the United States government wanted of them was that they be law abiding and faithful workers towards the fulfilment of tasks of this country. The Hungarian Americans have lived up to these expectations. These facts, of course, have put the Hungarian workers in favorable light in industry.

    Although the fact remains that the Hungarian worker did not establish himself during the war but away before the war they were recognized as favorable people to build the nation both morally and physically.

    The question will be asked, how did he establish himself? The answer is simple, the Hungarian is a good worker, and a good man as a citizen.

    It is natural that the Hungarian worker commands a lot of respect in industrial 3centers due to the fact that he can do hard physical work as well as good mental work. The Hungarian worker has a few very definite characteristics, he is exacting, sober minded, faithful and loyal in his work.

    The worker is not only liked by the employer, but is also liked by the city government and the community in which he lives. In order to analyze a man's character the American asks, does he belong to a church? Is he a God fearing man, and is he religions? And the Hungarian has everything in his favor with regards to the religious questions.

    The Hungarian mechanics are recognized as some of the best, and the American employer never hesitates to hire a Hungarian professional man.

    Industry likes the Hungarians, but does the Hungarian make a good soldier and does he like industry? The answer to this is unquestionably, yes.

    4

    It is only natural that Hungarians are entirely welcome to become citizens of the United States. They have been found to be good citizens both in this country and in their own.

    Therefore, taking everything into consideration, the Hungarian man becomes a contributing factor in the building of this country, and industry appreciates them and recognizes them for all they are worth.

    There has never been a better opportunity to prove that the American people recognize the Hungarian workers. This is probably due to the conditions which exist between this country and ...

    Hungarian
    III A, III H, I G, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 19, 1918
    Hungarian Republican Party

    It is just a few days since the Hungarian Republican Club was formed. At the organizing meeting it gave one great pleasure to see that there were so many Hungarian-American citizens who were interested in the political life of this country.

    As yet we have not found out who was on the organizing committee, but the latter asks all the Hungarian Republican voters to join this organization. Its purpose is to get more Hungarian people interested in American politics.

    It will also try to co-ordinate social life with political activities, and impress upon the voters the importance of taking an active part in the conduct of our country's affairs.

    It is just a few days since the Hungarian Republican Club was formed. At the organizing meeting it gave one great pleasure to see that there were so many Hungarian-American ...

    Hungarian
    I F 2, III A
  • Magyar Tribune -- February 01, 1918
    Convention of the American Federation.

    The Hungarian Americans have spoken. Representatives from every Hungarian American community assembled in Cleveland during the past week.

    The purpose of this assemblage and convention was to assure the government of the United States and the president, that the Hungarian people fully appreciate the protection and hospitality provided for them by this country and the President.

    At this convention the following resolutions were passed:

    (1). Resolved: That we express our sincere and deepest gratitude to the President for his recognition of the most honorable purposes of Hungarian residents in the United States by not regarding them as alien enemies. We assure the President that this convention was not misplanned, and that the Hungarians in America will continue to be attached and devoted to this country.

    2

    (2) That we re-affirm our unflinching loyalty to our country, the United States of America, and are proud of the fact, that the Hungarian Americans have at all times fulfilled their duties as citizens of this country. We appreciate the freedom and equality that the consitution of this country accords us, and are ready to uphold the ideals of our president, aiming to make the world safe for democracy,

    (3) That we recognize the importance of Americanizing the people coming to the shores of the United State. This has been pursued by all organizations and institutions of Hungarians at all times, and we pledge to continue these efforts.

    (4) That we have always stood for a free independent and democratic Hungary on the principles proclaimed by Louis Kossuth. We rejoice at the fact that the President makes the realization of this principal an absolute certainty.

    (5) That we are pleased to be apprised of the formation of The American Hungarian Loyalty League for the duration of the war, we endorse its aims and purposes. 3and we not only pledge our own cooperation, but also urge upon all Hungarians, citizens and non-citizens to join it.

    (6). That we further resolve that copies of this resolution be properly presented to the President and members of his cabinet, and to both houses of Congress.

    The Hungarian Americans have spoken. Representatives from every Hungarian American community assembled in Cleveland during the past week. The purpose of this assemblage and convention was to assure the government ...

    Hungarian
    III B 4, III A, I G
  • Magyar Tribune -- February 15, 1918
    Hungarian Boy Makes Good.

    There was great rejoicing at the home of Charles Tittinger, February 7th, because newshad reached there that their son had been promoted to captain in the army. To make his promotion more colorful, he also married an American girl, which doubled the weight of the celebration.

    Young Tittinger was born in Hungary in 1892, and came to this country, settling in Chicago. He is twenty-five years old, and has been in the United States army for the past eight years. He received his commission on his twenty-fifth birthday. The Chicago Hungarians should feel proud of him.

    There was great rejoicing at the home of Charles Tittinger, February 7th, because newshad reached there that their son had been promoted to captain in the army. To make his ...

    Hungarian
    III D, III A, IV