The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Magyar Tribune -- April 14, 1917
    Illinois Hungarian Ladies Sick Benefit Lodge

    Under the above name a new ladies sick benefit lodge has been organized. The organization took place on March the 8th, with a charter membership of thirty-eight, most of whom were residents of West Pullman. The South Side Hungarian ladies have shown considerable interest in this new organization.

    Election of officers took place at the regular meeting held for the month of April. The results were as follows: Mrs. John Movotz was elected president, Mrs. Steven Szilvagyi, vice president; Mrs. Julius Csaszav, secretary. Mrs. Irme Szabadosh,corresponding secretary, and Miss Mary Schmidlfall, comptroller.

    Every Hungarian lady may become a member of this organization. The initiation fee is $1.50,regular dues are 50 cents per month, and the lodge pays a sick benefit of $5.00 per week in case of sickness. The age limit is fifteen to forty-five years. Meetings are held the first Thursday of each month at 2 P.M. in Gemmler Hall.

    Under the above name a new ladies sick benefit lodge has been organized. The organization took place on March the 8th, with a charter membership of thirty-eight, most of whom ...

    Hungarian
    II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 12, 1917
    The Chicago Hungarian League Steps Forward

    The editors of this paper are whole heartedly with the Hungarian League of Chicago, but,due to unforeseen circumstances, could not be represented at the last meeting of the league. We will, however, keep our readers informed through Stephen Hattala who writes to us about a certain resolution passed at the last meeting.

    Mr. Hattala writes to us as follows:

    At the meeting of the league referred to, the following resolution was passed: "The Chicago Hungarian League, consisting of chartered Hungarian Lodges and associations has found it necessary to step forward in defense of Hungarian American Citizens, both as individuals and as a group. It is our aim to prove that the Hungarian American citizen can perform all the duties of a good American citizen. The League, for this 2reason, plans a giant celebration for the Fourth of July or American Independence Day. The League plans to have all Hungarian church congregations invited as well as all members of Hungarian Lodges, to celebrate this great day together, In this way we Hungarians, as a body,can show that we are good citizens and that we intend to fulfill all requirements of good citizenship." Stephen Hattala was the author of this resolution. The various organizational representatives present accepted the resolution unanimously. They also decided to appoint a nine man committee,which will visit all Hungarian lodges, whether members of the league or not, and extend to them a cordial invitation to attend this celebration.

    At this meeting it was also decided that all Hungarian newspapers will be asked to give this celebration as much publicity as possible. The next meeting of the league will be held on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, May 13, 1917 at Schlitz Hall. The secretary of the league will send out invitations to the Hungarian organizations in Chicago and urge that the representatives of each and every organization make it their business to be present, in order that a very fine program may be worked out. The league wants every living Hungarian 3in Chicago and near vicinity to attend this giant demonstration of good American citizenship among the Hungarians. (Hattala)

    The editors of this paper are whole heartedly with the Hungarian League of Chicago, but,due to unforeseen circumstances, could not be represented at the last meeting of the league. We ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, III A, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 05, 1917
    Hungarian Activities in the United States (Editorial)

    The Hungarian American people of the United States have only one type of organization that has been of common interest to all of them and that is the lodge. The lodges are not all alike, but there is no essential difference in principles. They play a very important part in the life of the Hungarians and should be the focal point of all their various activities.

    Regardless of the difference in principles, it should be their duty to further the development of organizations so important to the social and moral life of the Hungarians. I know the activities that have taken place among our people in the United States, outside of those that have been sponsored by the lodges, there has never been anything of a permanent nature, undertaken and finished.

    2

    I don't want to blame any individual for their shortcomings; it would be very easy to name the persons who have done quite a bit to retard this great work. Placing the blame on individuals would not help the cause, but probably harm it, and what is more, if the Hungarian-Americans want to do something, create something, it should not be left solely to individuals.

    There must be enough power, leadership and cooperation among the Hungarian-Americans to develop permanent institutions, even though it be necessary to disregard individual ideas. Maybe the belief is extant that a good number of Hungarians will leave the country after the war and therefore would not be interested. But I do not think they will leave in such large numbers that permanent activities among our nationals will have to be discontinued. On the contrary such activities will probably become more important in the future since a great number of Hungarians undoubtedly will return to this country.

    3

    I don't want to write about what activities should be started by the Hungarian-Americans because I do not want to force anything on the people that they might not want, or sincerely believe in. The people themselves should feel what they want. The Hungarian-Americans should not do what I or some one else thinks is a good idea, but they should decide what is most necessary and desirable for our group.

    I can not tell what the Hungarian-American feels is the most important activity in his life; But I do know that every other nationality has done something in their own interest. Their interests vary. Some are interested in hospitals, orphanages, aid societies, and sport activities; the Hungarian-American can not boast of any of these things.

    I don't believe that any nationality should be any more interested in such institutions than the Hungarians. A body of men such as the lodges should take the initiative, otherwise I can't see how the Hungarian-Americans can accomplish anything worth while in this field.

    4

    I have presented this idea, hoping that the lodges and its members will go into action so that we Hungarians can keep up with the other nationalities. I do not claim to be the first one to suggest that we Hungarians do something for ourselves. Up to date our work has been planless and scattered, not touching the soul of the Hungarian-American. A radical change will have to take place, and it is up to ourselves to create the social activities and in situations which will aid us in achieving a brighter future.

    The Hungarian American people of the United States have only one type of organization that has been of common interest to all of them and that is the lodge. The ...

    Hungarian
    III B 2, II D 10, II D 3, II D 1, II D 4, II B 3, I C
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 12, 1917
    Celebration October 6th

    Hungarian societies and churches in the vicinity of Chicago joined hands in celebration of October 6, in memory of the thirteen men who gave their lives that Hungary might have liberty. The churches had special masses and sermons on the occasion of this holiday.

    On Saturday evening October 6, the Independent Song Circle celebrated the holiday and had as special guest and speaker Paul Bevak. On October 7, the Reformed Churches of Chicago held special services of mourning and the same day the Hungarian Roman Catholic Churches held special masses for the occasion.

    The Chicago Social and Sick Benefit Lodge whichhas celebrated this holiday every year since its inception will celebrate after its usual monthly meeting which will be held on October 14. They will have as a guest speaker of the evening, Ignac Izsak.

    Hungarian societies and churches in the vicinity of Chicago joined hands in celebration of October 6, in memory of the thirteen men who gave their lives that Hungary might have ...

    Hungarian
    III B 3 a, III C, II B 1 a, IV, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- October 26, 1917
    Organization of Hungarian Reformed Ladies Aid Society

    In the community of South Chicago the lady members of the local Hungarian Church on Sunday October 7, organized a lodge. Their main purpose will be to aid in the development of the church and to help promote various functions of the church.

    The membership of this organization is seventeen, the dues are ten cents per month and if death occurs among its members each member contributes fifty cents towards a death benefit which is given to the family of the deceased.

    In the community of South Chicago the lady members of the local Hungarian Church on Sunday October 7, organized a lodge. Their main purpose will be to aid in the ...

    Hungarian
    III C, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- January 11, 1918
    Consolidation of Sick Benefit Organizations.

    The Burnside Virgin Mary Sick Benefit Association and St.Imre Sick Benefit Association held a joint meeting and conference to decide on the consolidation of the two organizations.

    It was decided that the organization be combined and one set of officers was elected jointly by the two organizations, and the combination of the two names was decided upon. In the future this organization will be known as, The Virgin Mary and St.Imre Sick Benefit Association.

    The Burnside Virgin Mary Sick Benefit Association and St.Imre Sick Benefit Association held a joint meeting and conference to decide on the consolidation of the two organizations. It was decided ...

    Hungarian
    II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- February 15, 1918
    Convention

    The Chicago and district sick benefit lodges finally held a convention last Sunday. This convention was supposed to have been held several weeks previously, but due to the extreme cold weather and heavy snowfall at that time the convention was postponed.

    The convention was held in the West Pullman community house and practically every lodge and sick benefit association in the Chicago district was represented.

    Many problems were discussed but foremost was the problem of attaining members to the different organizations because there has been such a heavy loss in memberships in the past year.

    The Chicago and district sick benefit lodges finally held a convention last Sunday. This convention was supposed to have been held several weeks previously, but due to the extreme cold ...

    Hungarian
    III B 4, II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- May 24, 1918
    Hungarians to Build Community Center

    The Hungarians residing in the more central part of Chicago have done a lot of talking in regards to building a Hungarian Home for recreational purposes. The question is discussed and soon everyone involved forgets about it.

    The Hungarian community located on the South Side of Chicago, known as Burnside, has many organizations. One of these, The Virgin Mary Roman Catholic Sick Benefit Association at its last meeting started the ball rolling and opened a campaign that will make a Hungarian Home in the community of Burnside possible. This organization has voted four thousand dollars as a start in the campaign. The project is to be supported by practically all organizations on the South Side. It is the hope of all involved that this plan of a Hungarian Community Center will be realized in the near future.

    The Hungarians residing in the more central part of Chicago have done a lot of talking in regards to building a Hungarian Home for recreational purposes. The question is discussed ...

    Hungarian
    II D 6, II D 1, III C
  • Magyar Tribune -- July 05, 1918
    New Benevolent Society in Burnside.

    In Burnside, a new branch of the Protected Home Circle Benevolent Association, to be known as Hungarian Branch 202, has just been organized.

    This branch, although only a few weeks old, has a membership of fifty. From all indications this organization will soon have a membership of more than one hundred.

    The following are officers of the organization: Peter Auer, president; John Racz, vice president; Irma Barna, comptroller; John Doycsak, treasurer, and John Gabriel, inner guard. The organization holds its meetings the last Sunday of each month. Those people who are interested in this new organization are urged to communicate with Henry Barna, the organizer and founder of the Hungarian branch. He is located at 716 E. 92nd St.

    In Burnside, a new branch of the Protected Home Circle Benevolent Association, to be known as Hungarian Branch 202, has just been organized. This branch, although only a few weeks ...

    Hungarian
    II D 1
  • Magyar Tribune -- September 20, 1918
    A New Society

    A new society is being introduced into the circle of Hungarian societies. It is a society with good principles and high ideals: "The Twentieth Century-Ladies Society." The officers of this new society are: Mrs. Paul Biss, president; Mrs. Lena Steiner is the secretary, and Mrs. Schlesenger is the treasurer, and Mrs. Szivmay is the organizer.

    The introduction of this new society will take place on September 28th, when this newly organized society will sponsor an evening of entertainment.

    This society is a benevolent society and a charitable organization.

    A new society is being introduced into the circle of Hungarian societies. It is a society with good principles and high ideals: "The Twentieth Century-Ladies Society." The officers of this ...

    Hungarian
    II D 10, II D 1