The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Greek Star -- September 23, 1904
    Greek Athletic Club of Chicago

    p. 2- Initiated and sponsored by Mr. N. Protopapas, the Greek Athletic Club of Chicago has been founded. Eighty-five members have already been enrolled. At the next meeting officers will be elected and installed.

    Mr. Protopapas, who holds the record for lifting, is an athlete of great renown. Being a professional athlete, he was not permitted to participate in the Olympic Games in St. Louis. His record of lifting 306 pounds is still unchallenged. Pericles Kakoustris, the Greek who won the title for lifting at the Olympic Games in St. Louis, lifted a weight of 246 pounds only.

    Beyond any doubt the Greek community welcomes the formation of the Greek Athletic Club of Chicago for the great physical benefit which it will render to the Greek youth.

    Only time will prove whether this newly-formed athletic club will produce athletic champions of whom Chicago and the Greek community will be proud.

    p. 2- Initiated and sponsored by Mr. N. Protopapas, the Greek Athletic Club of Chicago has been founded. Eighty-five members have already been enrolled. At the next meeting officers will ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III E, IV
  • Greek Star -- March 10, 1905
    The Power of Athletics the Development of Body and Mind Progress of the Greek Athletic Club in Chicago

    P.1--Whatever else man may be, he belongs primarily to the animal kingdom. As the flower from its root in the soil develops and unfolds all its beauty and fills the atmosphere with its fragrance, so do all the intelligence of man and his moral and intellectual accomplishments depend upon his physical existence.

    Soundness of mind, which is the basis of intellectual vigor--that is, of real art, science, philology, and ethics--depends upon the health of the body.

    The Greeks were the first people who generally acknowledged the importance of a healthy body. And so great was their devotion to health that a statue of the goddess Hygeia, Health, was erected in Athens four hundred years before Christ.

    2

    In ancient Greece the human body reached its highest perfection. We can assuredly say that the eleven thousand Greeks who stormed the barbaric hordes of the Persians at the battle of Marathon were the most perfect manifestations of humanity that our planed has ever seen. It was therefore no miracle that they defeated the Persians, one Greek to twenty barbarians. Every Greek had the purest and healthiest of blood, which developed him into a real man before whom the Medes fell like ears of corn before a tornado. Every one had muscles of iron and hands and feet as strong as a lion's claws. But the Greeks, as we all know, did not neglect the development of the mind. They used to say, "Healthy mind in Healthy body." And that accounts for their pre-eminence and for their superiority, recorded in history, in the battles of Marathon, Salamis, and Plataea. Greece at that time was a country of athletes, and the Greek people considered gymnastics part of their education just as much as letters, music, and mathematics. In the eyes of the Greeks the body was something sacred. They had a high reverence for beauty. When a Grecian woman became a mother, her highest aspiration was to bring forth children of the utmost beauty and shapeliness. The best-trained nurses were brought to Athens from everywhere to take care of the 3growing generation. When Phryne, whose beauty was equal to that of the Aphrodite of Praxiteles, was brought before the bar of justice, the judges unanimously decided in her favor. One historian says, "The Greeks, the distinguished pioneers who built the Parthenon, the immortal sculptors, the dramatists, the statesmen, the rhetoricians, were the product of healthiness of mind and of body. With the fall of Greece the world sank into darkness."

    The world as well as modern Greeks must bear in mind that the axiom of the ancient Greeks, "Healthy mind in healthy body," is not only physiologically correct and indisputable but is also religiously sound. The mind, which is divine, in order to function properly and reveal the divinity of its origin must of necessity operate in a healthy physical organism.

    Those members of the Greek community in Chicago who recently formed the first Greek Athletic Club here are to be congratulated and highly esteemed. The Greeks of Chicago, as chips of the old block, should not under their present favorable circumstances underestimate the importance of gymnastics. Favorable circumstances they are, for American Greeks live in the greatest 4country in the world, a country which in days to come will outshine every glory of the past and lead the world to new heights in the development of manhood.

    This new club of the Greeks in years to come, when the Greek-American generation flourishes, will be proud of its name, for the chips of the old block, nourished and cultivated in American environment, will become the highest type of Americanism. The membership of the club is increasing so rapidly that the original plans must give way to new ones. The management and the members have the respect and the support of the whole Chicago Greek community.

    The above article is printed specifically for Greek parents, who are urged by this paper to take advantage of favorable circumstances and present to the community children of greater beauty, symmetry, and mental endowment.

    P.1--Whatever else man may be, he belongs primarily to the animal kingdom. As the flower from its root in the soil develops and unfolds all its beauty and fills the ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III E
  • Greek Star -- December 22, 1905
    Philomaths' Fraternity

    p. 4- Forty young Greeks attending colleges and universities in Chicago met last week and after exchanging views and ideas decided to form a fraternity of their own, which will be known as the Philomaths' Fraternity.

    The aim of the newly-formed circle is to provide mutual cooperation and mutual assistance in spreading scientific knowledge by lectures, debates, and other similar affairs, thus disabusing the superstitious minds of the misinformed and ignorant public.

    Credit and honor are due to these young philomaths, and their title is correct, for their inclination for learning and their love of it will eventually open for them the door into that hall of polymathy which they aspire to enter. Although the newly-founded fraternity is unique in the life of the Greek community in Chicago, it has nevertheless had predecessors in Greece.

    p. 4- Forty young Greeks attending colleges and universities in Chicago met last week and after exchanging views and ideas decided to form a fraternity of their own, which will ...

    Greek
    II B 1 d, I A 1 a, III E
  • Greek Star -- June 29, 1906
    Formation of Philharmonic Society

    P.4--Some young Greeks in Chicago who were members of philharmonic societies in Greece have formed the first philharmonic society in Chicago, which will be at the disposal of the Greek community.

    The young Greeks who offer their services free of charge to our compatriots are John Petrochelos, K. Kacheerumbas, Theodore Kacheerumbas, Takis Karnavezos, Anastasius Karahalios, Aristides Kacheekas, I. Theodoru, K. Katsachnias, N. Nicolaou, Pericles Grammatikakes, Emanuel Voggas, Soter Karampateas, B. Spyropoulos, G. Silas, Demetrios Polites, P. Polimenacos, and D. Provatakes.

    Dr. N. Salopoulos, consul general of Greece in Chicago, presided at the meeting of the Greek amateurs and congratulated them on their initiative in forming the society and on their willingness to serve the community gratis.

    P.4--Some young Greeks in Chicago who were members of philharmonic societies in Greece have formed the first philharmonic society in Chicago, which will be at the disposal of the Greek ...

    Greek
    II B 1 a, III E, IV
  • Greek Star -- October 19, 1906
    Greek Philarmonic Concert to Be Given on October 28th

    p. 3- Several young Greeks, lovers of music and song, who were members of various philarmonic societies in Greece, have recently united to found the first Greek philarmonic society in Chicago's Greek community.

    These boys on October 28th, will give a concert before the Woman's Club of Hull House with a program that will please all. The specific object of the concert is to raise funds so that they may dress in uniform.

    Since these young men are a credit to our community, which they are serving gratis, everybody is requested to attend the affair. Let us show our musical boys how much we think of them!. If it is impossible for you to attend. buy half a dozen tickes anyway! The concert must be a success in attendance and in receipts for the encouragement of our boys.

    Greek families especially are requested to attend the concert with all their children. Greek music and Greek songs are nourishing food for our new race in America.

    p. 3- Several young Greeks, lovers of music and song, who were members of various philarmonic societies in Greece, have recently united to found the first Greek philarmonic society in ...

    Greek
    II B 1 a, III E
  • Greek Star -- December 21, 1906
    Performance of the Chicago Greek Troupe Crowned with Success--Comments of the City Press

    Young Greeks of Chicago, devotees of the dramatic art, who recently organized the first Greek troupe in Chicago, presented the popular play, "Esme e Tourkopoula" (Esme the (Turkish) Girl) at Turner Hall last Sunday. The performance was acclaimed by Chicago newspapers as a brilliant success. Practically all the press commented very favorably, and in flattering terms described the naturalness of the young Greeks, whose acting was pleasing and realistic.

    "Orpheus" is the name of the Greek troupe, and true to tradition, these young Chicago Greeks have the power, as Orpheus had, of charming even inanimate objects with their lyres.

    In response to numerous requests the performance will be repeated next Sunday at Hull House so that the crowds of people who wish to see this popular drama 2may have an opportunity to do so.

    The troupe intends to present in the immediate future another play, "Sklava" (The Slave Girl), for the benefit of the national defense fund of Greece.

    Announcements of the production will soon be published.

    Young Greeks of Chicago, devotees of the dramatic art, who recently organized the first Greek troupe in Chicago, presented the popular play, "Esme e Tourkopoula" (Esme the (Turkish) Girl) at ...

    Greek
    II B 1 c 1, II D 10, III E, III H
  • Loxias -- January 27, 1909
    The Athletic Club

    p.1.- The young men of our Greek community assembled, one evening, and decided to form an Athletic Club. Their purpose is educational, militaristic, athletic and patriotic. The formation of this club has much significance. We hope it does not go the way of so many Greek clubs that believe in fighting each other instead of working together. We heartily congratulate our boys for the fine spirit they have shown. They are the heart and soul of the coming generation and we are proud of them. May they continue this good work for years to come.

    p.1.- The young men of our Greek community assembled, one evening, and decided to form an Athletic Club. Their purpose is educational, militaristic, athletic and patriotic. The formation of this ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III E
  • Loxias -- May 12, 1909
    Various News

    p. 4.- On the day of St. Constantine the South Side Church will give its first annual picnic under the auspices of the South Side Greek Orthodox Church of Chicago. All Greek Chicagoans are invited.

    On the same day the club of Greek Youth is giving a picnic and expects all of our countrymen to be present. They expect to make enough money to build a gymnasium.

    p. 4.- On the day of St. Constantine the South Side Church will give its first annual picnic under the auspices of the South Side Greek Orthodox Church of Chicago. ...

    Greek
    III C, II B 3, III E
  • Loxias -- July 15, 1909
    Young Men's Club

    Once again we must write of the splendid progress of the Greek Young Men's Club. They have over $2,000 in the treasury with a membership of over 300 men.

    Among the popular young men of our day who are active members of the club, we find G. Bembakaris, S. Karapateas, J. Dimitrakopoulos, D. Kontopoulos, L. Skribanos, C. Granias, and K. Alexopoulos. N. Sakantakis is secretary and A. Mouzakiotis is treasurer.

    Once again we must write of the splendid progress of the Greek Young Men's Club. They have over $2,000 in the treasury with a membership of over 300 men. Among ...

    Greek
    III E
  • Loxias -- August 07, 1909
    Financial Report First six months, 1909, of the Young Men's Athletic Club.

    Income

    Gifts and Donations

    From K. Alexopoulos $4.00
    From A. Mouzakiotis 4.00
    From A. Bakalou 1.00
    From Exhibit by C. Granias 58.00
    From Raffle of a clock given by Messrs. Tzathas & Pikras 92.10
    From performance given by G. Borbos, the play "Sophocles" 24.45
    $183.55
    2

    Initiation and Dues

    Initiation and Dues for the first 3 months $246.50
    Initiations and Dues for the second 3 months 119.00
    Prepayments 3.50
    $369.00

    Uniforms

    From members uniforms 153.50
    153.50

    Gymnastics

    From selling 60 gymnastic tickets 15.00
    From penalties in the gymnasium .72
    15.72

    Gym Uniforms

    3
    Paid uniforms 121.50
    121.50

    Past Dues

    Past Dues $227.00
    $227.00
    Total $1,070.27

    Expenses

    Office Expense

    Accountant Books $4.95
    Stationery 1.85
    To collections 7.50
    Invitations 4.50
    Ink, envelopes, paper, etc 1.00

    General Expenses

    Charter for club 10.00
    Rents 39.50
    Newspapers 1.23
    Flags 2.00
    4
    Rent of Hull House $25.00
    To T. Katsiroupas for services 15.00
    92.73

    Philanthropic Expense

    To Masouridos' trial 10.00
    10.00

    Members Uniforms

    James H. Hirsch & Co. for 50 members uniforms 270.00
    270.00

    Over Head

    Picture of Lincoln 2.45
    Bugle for Parade 3.00
    Crowns 4.50
    Various Instruments 57.60
    Meeting Cords (1000) 6.50
    1000 Constitutions 30.00
    5
    50 guns $75.00
    American dictionaries 4.14
    183.19

    Treasury

    In the Greek-American Bank 112.92
    To A. Mouzakiotis, treasurer 33.13
    146.05

    Debts

    Uniforms 121.50
    Dues 227.00
    $348.50
    Total $1,070.27

    In Chicago, July 25, 1909.

    Secretary

    J. Agriostathis.

    Trustees

    A. Mouzakiotis

    K. Alexopoulos

    K. Dimopoulus

    Income Gifts and Donations <table> <tr> <td>From K. Alexopoulos</td> <td>$4.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>From A. Mouzakiotis</td> <td>4.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>From A. Bakalou</td> <td>1.00</td> </tr> <tr> <td>From Exhibit by C. Granias</td> <td>58.00</td> ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III E, IV