The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Greek Star -- February 12, 1904
    The Greeks in Chicago

    At a recent meeting of the splendid Greek Panhellenic Club of Chicago, it was decided that the members discontinue paying the monthly dues of twenty-five cents, which were to go into the treasury of a certain Greek company known as the "Hellenism Company". As a result, Mr. S. Georgiadis, the president of the club, has resigned his position because he did not approve of this action. Many of the members appealed to Mr. Georgiadis to withdraw his resignation, but their request was not heeded. So, the members of the club will have to elect a new chairman very soon.

    It is well known that Mr. Georgiadis was the founder of the Greek Panhellenic Club, as well as its first president. He has done outstanding work in formulating the club's objectives and in furthering the general welfare of the members.

    At a recent meeting of the splendid Greek Panhellenic Club of Chicago, it was decided that the members discontinue paying the monthly dues of twenty-five cents, which were to go ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • Greek Star -- July 08, 1904
    Chicago Greeks Form Patriotic Society, the First in the United States.

    With delight and pride the Greeks of America will hear that the Greeks of Chicago have founded a patriotic society under the name of Military Association.

    The object of this newly-organized society is to assist financially the National Defense Society of Athens, Greece. The membership fee is fifty cents per month. The accumulated money from fees and from benefit dances and similar activities of the society will be sent semi-annually to Athens without deducting any expenses for the operation of the society. The expenses of the society will be taken care of by contributions of the executive board. So every dollar collected will be sent for the national defense of Mother-Greece.

    2

    The Military Association will conduct each year a Pan-Hellenic dance, an excursion, a Lottery, and a bazaar to increase its funds. Lectures, mainly patriotic but also on social, commercial, and professional subjects will be delivered in the society's hall by prominent Greeks of Chicago and elsewhere, who will be invited for that purpose.

    At the meeting which took place yesterday all the foremost Greeks of Chicago were present, and chose by ballot the following officers and officials of the Military Association:

    Crown Prince Constantine of Greece, president; J. Georgiadis and N. Giannakopoulos (reserve officers of the Greek Army) first and second vice-presidents respectively; St. Lambardakis, general treasurer; Messrs. A. Apostolakos, N. Karellas, and K. Loumos, treasurers; Messrs. Kyriakopoulos and Koliopoulos, secretaries. Members of the board were elected as follows:

    3

    Messrs. Geo. Koutsoubos, D. Kalogeropoulos, K. Koutsogiannis, Andrew Vlachos, Christ Vretos, G. Kokinovrachos, A. Papchristofilou, B. Varelas, G. Surlis, A. Bolas, J. Demetriadis,and J. Adinamis.

    Star's Note:

    The management of this paper sincerely congratulates the initiation of this splendid idea. It is about time for the Greeks of the world to come to the assistance of Mother Greece in a Pan-Hellenic way and strengthen the treasury of that famous and glorious country.

    With delight and pride the Greeks of America will hear that the Greeks of Chicago have founded a patriotic society under the name of Military Association. The object of this ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, III B 2, IV
  • Greek Star -- September 23, 1904
    Picnic of the Pan-Hellenic Society

    P. 2 - Last Thursday more than three hundred members of the Pan-Hellenic Association and their families held a grand picnic, at which dancing, singing, dining and wining, were indulged in with distinguished moderation. The affair was so marvelously well conducted that an impartial observer would have thought that all this crowd belonged to one family. Their return to the city was also distinguished by correct behavior. Decorum, order, beauty, and harmony were displayed by men, women, and children in their parade through the downtown district.

    Their example should be copied by other associations and groups which in their hilarity forget that the city is inhabited by other people besides themselves. Such parades are satisfying to the mind, pleasant to the eye, and a credit to the associations and to us all.

    P. 2 - Last Thursday more than three hundred members of the Pan-Hellenic Association and their families held a grand picnic, at which dancing, singing, dining and wining, were indulged ...

    Greek
    III B 2
  • Greek Star -- March 24, 1905
    Installation of Officers of the Pan-Hellenic Society

    p.2--Elaborate plans were laid a week ahead for the brilliant ceremony which took place last Sunday at the Masonic Temple, the installation of the new officers of the Pan-Hellenic. Society

    Eight hundred Greeks and Americans of Chicago and elsewhere participated in the event, which was characterized by many reporters who were present as the best that they had ever seen. The two ministers of the Greeks church, the Reverend Fathers Pegeas and Mandilaris, attired in their magnificent ecclesiastical robes, pronounced the doxology, which was devoutly followed by the attending crowd. After the solemn and dignified ceremony of receiving the path of office from the new officers the president of the Society, Mr. Eustathios Karavolis, delivered an eloquent address on unity, cooperation, and Americanism. He was followed by the Reverend Father Tegeas, who spoke on humanized religion and devotion to the laws of our adopted country. Dr. M. Halliondges spoke on hygines and sanitary habitations and urged the members and officers of the Society to become crusaders for the cause of sanitation both in business and at home. Other speakers were Messrs. Goe. Matales. Geo. Houtroumanos 2, and Geo. Yokaris, who spoke on the Greek's duty toward America, our present country, and toward Mother-Greece, who expects every son of hers to remember her. The popular Greek tenor, Notis Limberopoulos, sang various songs with Miss P. Poulis at the piano.

    Among the several visitors who attended the affair were the Reverend Father Chiapralis of San Francisco, who has been here for the last ten days soliciting contributions for the prection of a Greek church in the Bay City.

    A dance followed the ceremony, lasting will the early hours of the day.

    p.2--Elaborate plans were laid a week ahead for the brilliant ceremony which took place last Sunday at the Masonic Temple, the installation of the new officers of the Pan-Hellenic. Society ...

    Greek
    III B 2, II B 1 a, III C, IV
  • Greek Star -- April 14, 1905
    Benefit Dance a Success for the Macedonian Cause

    P.2--In order to assist fellow-Greek in Macedonin, the Pan-Hellenic society of Chicago held a benefit dance last Friday which was attended by a crowd of 2,000. The proceeds of the dance exceeded $4,500. This sum will be added to the general fund for the Macedonians and will be sent to the central committee in Athens, Greece.

    Although the dance, which lasted till 4 A. M., was conducted in a very orderly manner, nevertheless at 3 A. M. the lights went out, and the word pell-mell describes the situation for a quarter of an hour.

    P.2--In order to assist fellow-Greek in Macedonin, the Pan-Hellenic society of Chicago held a benefit dance last Friday which was attended by a crowd of 2,000. The proceeds of the ...

    Greek
    III B 2, II D 10, III H
  • Greek Star -- September 08, 1905
    Pan-American Marathon Race--A Greek Runner to Participat

    P.3--On September 23, a Marathon Race will take place in Chicago to which the principal athletic clubs of America will send members for participation. The Pan-Hellenic Club of Chicago will be represented by L. Lambrakis. A committee composed of Dr. John Volicos, N. Protopappas, and Ch. Vlachandreas has been appointed by the Greek club to follow Lambrakis in an automobile and assist him in case of need.

    Lambrakis, who is 23 years old and has lived here for the last ten years, was born in Koniditsa, Sellacia county, Lacedaemon, Greece. In spite of his small stature he possesses tremendous power and endurance. Although he is to compete with twenty other runners who are considered perfectly well qualified to win the race, many of his American friends have already proclaimed him as winner.

    The Pan-Hellenic Club will be represented at the grand stand of the Washington Park Club by Messrs. Karavelis, Printezis, and Demetracopoulos and 2by the already chosen committee of three which will follow the young Greek racer. The route of the twenty-five-mile race is as follows: on Saturday, September 23, at 2 P.M., from the Evanston Golf Club grounds, the startingpoint of the race, by Sheridan Road, Lake Shore Drive, Lincoln Park, Lake Shore Drive, Chicago Avenue, Rush Street and Rush Street Bridge to Michigan Avenue; by Michigan Avenue, Garfield Boulevard, and Washington Park Speedway to the Washington Park Club. Greeks and a great many Americans who know Lambrakis have placed heavy bets on him. Lambrakis will be the only alien in the race; the other nineteen runners are Americans. Can he win? Let us see!

    P.3--On September 23, a Marathon Race will take place in Chicago to which the principal athletic clubs of America will send members for participation. The Pan-Hellenic Club of Chicago will ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III B 2, I C, IV
  • Greek Star -- September 29, 1905
    The Chicago Marathon Race-Lambrakis Wins.

    p. 2-Last Saturday the marathon race of Chicago took place under the auspices of the Illinois Athletic club. Twenty runners participated in the race; eighteen Americans, members of various clubs, one Frenchman, and Lambrakis, the Greek, representing the Pan-Hellenic club of Chicago.

    Lambrakis, aided by his American friends, came in first and won the race, thus honoring the city of Chicago, his friends, the club which he represented, and himself. The Pan-Hellenic club of Chicago and the Greek community are proud of Lambrakis's victory.

    The comments of the city press were numerous and complimentary. Every daily graphically described the Greek's victory and his tremendous endurance.

    2

    A group of Lambrakis's American friends, who had followed him all the way along the twenty-five mile route, being convinced in advance of the outcome, filled the air with deafening cries of "Hurrah for Greece! Hurrah for Greece!" Lambrakis, after making the circuit of the grand stand three times to comply with the rules of the executive committee, cut the ribbon as victor and unaided and in good physical condition went to his room, changed his clothes, presented himself to photographers, and then departed with his American friends, who carried him away on their shoulders.

    Several hours later a sumptuous dinner was served at William Trebilecok's residence in honor of the Greek's victory.

    Among numerous Americans who were interested in Lambrakis's achievement the following persons were kind enough to give us their names: William Trebilecok, John Kenny, H. Harrison, O. Allstrom, O. E. Vogelsang, E. C. Reece, Carl Heim, Joe Fitch, E. Drock, and Will and John Dunbar.

    3

    The victorious Greek appeared next day before the committee and received the gold and diamond award in a brilliant ceremony.

    p. 2-Last Saturday the marathon race of Chicago took place under the auspices of the Illinois Athletic club. Twenty runners participated in the race; eighteen Americans, members of various clubs, ...

    Greek
    II B 3, III B 2, I C
  • Greek Star -- November 24, 1905
    First Public Greek Lectures at Hull House.

    p. 3. -With a rich and varied program and under the auspices of the Pan-Hellenic Society the first public lectures in Greek will be delivered next Sunday at Hull House.

    Our fellow-Greeks and their families are urgently invited to attend. The program is as follows:

    1. Singing of the American and the Greek anthems (Choir led by Vlachandreas, Matalas, and Protopapas).

    2. Piano selections by young American ladies.

    3. Introduction by E. Karavelis, president of the society.

    4. Address, "Mutual Love and Mutual Assistance," by Archimandrite Ambrosius Mandelaris.

    2

    5. Poem by Geo. Koutoumanos.

    6. Address, "The Political Situation in Greece," by Sp. Kotakis.

    7. Song by the choir.

    8. Address "The Duties of the Greek in America," by F. Shioris.

    9. Address,"America and Greece," by Dr. K. Kollionojis.

    10. Piano selections by Miss Poulis and songs by Miss Palamaris.

    11. Hymn of the Turk-fighting Greek.

    Families with children are requested not to miss these lectures.

    p. 3. -With a rich and varied program and under the auspices of the Pan-Hellenic Society the first public lectures in Greek will be delivered next Sunday at Hull House. ...

    Greek
    II B 2 g, III B 2, IV
  • Greek Star -- December 01, 1905
    Necessity for Lectures. (Editorial)

    One more step has been taken by the Greek colony of Chicago to better itself and to establish a precedent for the Greeks in America. The first public lectures in Greek were delivered last week at Hull House and were heard by a vast audience, in which women and children predominated. This is a forward step and a corner-stone in the constructive effort to shape and mold the minds of the public.

    Patriotism, religious education, our duties to our countries, adopted and native, and various other subjects were discussed in the lectures.

    Their explicit and analytical form facilitated their absorption by the attentively listening audience.

    2

    We are glad to hear that other lectures will follow, and the Star congratulates the Pan-Hellenic Society for its devotion to that which is Greek and for its initiative in taking the first step along this line of progress.

    One more step has been taken by the Greek colony of Chicago to better itself and to establish a precedent for the Greeks in America. The first public lectures in ...

    Greek
    II B 2 g, III B 2
  • Greek Star -- December 15, 1905
    Preparations for Greek-American Meeting.

    p. 4. -Responding to the request of Miss Addams, a committee of prominent members of the Greek community, headed by the Reverend Father Pegeas, met last Friday at Hull House and laid plans for a "come-together and know-one-another" meeting of Greeks and Americans.

    Beaming with joy in the presence of so many Greeks, who represented every station of life in the community, the honorable lady, who is widely known as the friend of foreigners and especially of Greeks, took the floor after calling the meeting to order and expressed her thoughts,in particular her desire to effect a closer association of the Greek and the native elements and to make known the progress of the Greeks in the city of Chicago and if possible of those in other parts of the country.

    2

    The Greeks, who always stand ready for anything good, after listening to the constructive words of Miss Addams appointed a numerous organization committee, headed by the Reverend Leontios Pegeas, archimandrite of the Greek church, to complete all the details of the forthcoming Greek-American meeting, which will take place on January 3, 1906.

    The organization comprises all the Greek societies and organizations, the professionals, the merchants and businessmen, and the church. The Hon. Dr. N. Salapoulos, Consul General of Greece in Chicago, will also serve on the committee.

    This is one more step in our progress to real Americanization; the heterogeneous elements of America will mingle with the homogeneous old-American element to form the solid rock of Americanism. Sound thinking and good work! The initiator of the idea is well acquainted with the law of imitation, which has a tremendous influence upon us mortals.

    3

    Congratulations to Miss Addams and to the committee for undertaking a task so constructive and so wide in its scope!

    The Program.

    Music

    American Hymn.

    Greek Hymn.

    Address by Miss Jane Addams.

    Music

    Address (in English) by K. N. Karalopoulos

    Music

    4

    Address (in Greek) by Andrew J. Vlachos

    Music

    Addresses by Dr. N. Salopoulos and Dr. Gr. Papaeliou

    Music

    American Hymn

    Greek Hymn

    p. 4. -Responding to the request of Miss Addams, a committee of prominent members of the Greek community, headed by the Reverend Father Pegeas, met last Friday at Hull House ...

    Greek
    I C, III B 2, III C, II A 1, II A 2, IV