The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Greek Star -- February 05, 1904
    [Appeal for the Macedonian Relief Committee]

    May we call to the attention of the Greek people of Chicago the new appeal of the Macedonian Relief Committee? The purpose of this committee is to collect funds and supplies for the victims and sufferers in Macedonia, Greece.

    The presidents and responsible leaders of our organizations, clubs, and church parishes in Chicago and in all other communities in the United States are urged to do their part, and to undertake the patriotic action of organizing local committees for the collection of relief funds. It is the duty of all true Greeks, whose hearts are inspired by altruistic sentiments and sympathy for our suffering brothers in Greece, to show that we have not forgotten our fatherland and that we are thinking of it in its difficulties and trials.

    The Star, an active supporter of this drive for relief funds, recommends that all the church committees, especially those whose task it is to care for the poor, undertake to collect maoney by passing an extra collection basket on 2Sundays and on every important feast day or holiday. This money will be used to provide food, clothing, shelter, and medical treatment for the unfortunate Greeks of Macedonia.

    May we call to the attention of the Greek people of Chicago the new appeal of the Macedonian Relief Committee? The purpose of this committee is to collect funds and ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III H
  • Greek Star -- February 05, 1904
    Greek News of Chicago

    We are calling the attention of the Greek community to the recently organized Committee for Macedonian Aid whose purpose is to help the suffering and destitute Greeks of Krousobos. We beg the presidents of all the Greek societies and clubs to do their national duty as they see fit and as their Greek training and patriotic ideals have taught them. The Star will gladly accept any donations or contributions and suggests that a special collection be taken up in all the Greek Orthodox churches of the United States during the Sunday services and during all special masses for this noble and humanitarian cause.

    We are calling the attention of the Greek community to the recently organized Committee for Macedonian Aid whose purpose is to help the suffering and destitute Greeks of Krousobos. We ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III C, III H
  • Greek Star -- July 01, 1904
    The Hue and Cry of the American Press against Foreigners Who Send the Country's Wealth Aboard Greeks Taken as an Example (Editorial)

    With unanimous voice the American press of the city and of the nation has for the last month been printing article after article about the impending danger that the wealth of the country, in a period of ten years, will all have been sent to various foreign countries. And as is usually the case, the Greeks of the land are taken as an example.

    The press points out that the Greeks send $2,000,000 annually to their native land, and it argues that the other 20,000,000 foreigners from Europe and Asia must therefore send $200,000,000 to their several countries.

    2

    This sum of money exported every year for ten years will amount to $2,000,000,000 in gold. Consequently the press wants America to enact laws prohibiting the exportation of money because in years to come the country's wealth will be exhausted by foreigners who send it away.

    The editors who have prepared and published these articles about the impending danger are not correct in their reasoning. Their calculations are all wrong, and our agrument follows to refute their contentions.

    Among immigrants we find Irish, Germans, Poles, and Scandinavians who have come to America by hundreds of thousands with the specific intention of staying here and settling, and the majority of them have brought their families with them. This foreign element came here to stay, and the money which they may have sent back at first is absolutely insignificant, because for them this country is their home, their wealth, their all, and they have broken every relationship and tie with their native lands. Consequently no money in any great amount will be exported by them. The total of $2,000,000,000, by reason of this logical and indisputable fact, diminishes to insignificance.

    3

    As an exception to this rule we have the Greeks, part of the Italians, and other immigrants from the East. The Greeks above all other nationalities, as the papers say, send back home enormous sums of money. That is true. The Greek never forgets his parents, his brothers, his sisters, or his other relatives. He sends money, which he earns with great effort, to ameliorate conditions for his family; he sends money and plenty of it to marry his sisters and to educate his brothers (if they do not come here); and in addition to all this he sends money to his beloved Greece to build streets, roads, churches, schools, waterworks, and many other new things which he sees in America. He contributes money for the defense of his beloved native land and for many other things for which the nationalities above mentioned send not one dollar. And so with justice and with truth the Greek is singled out as the immigrant who sends plenty of money back home. That the mythical sum of two billion dollars could never be reached if this argument is valid stands to reason. The hue and cry of the press is unsupported by logic.

    And now we will take the Greek (as others do) as an example. Before he left his beloved country, which is likewise dear to every other right-thinking person the world over, he was informed that America the great 4is a free country and the most democratic country in the world; that freedom and justice and philanthropy are the pillars which support this huge democracy, known as the daughter of ancient Greece because its government is thence derived. Without casting any insinuations at the other nationalities above mentioned, we may say that the Greek has traditions which are to him very sacred. His obligation and his responsibility to his family and his love for it are part of his religion. His supreme patriotic devotion to his country is recorded in the annals of time, as are many other traditions which for thousands of years he has distinguished himself by maintaining. Indeed, he cannot abandon them and throw them off so easily as we change socks. He cannot be so easily assimilated and absorbed by his environment. He stands upon solid rock. If he could change his country as quickly as he changes his shirt, he could never be a good citizen of any country. America the great does not expect him to forget his family and his mother-country. His native Greece, his religion, and his family are never forgotten by the Greek. And when he came here, he did not hesitate to tell the truth; that is, that he did not come here to stay and settle. But he came here to this free and just country to work hard and earn some money.

    5

    If the greatness of the country is such as to absorb him in the future, it is not his fault. He will do his damnedest to return to his native Greece, but from what we already observe we venture to say that the unconquerable Greek will eventually become an integral part of this great country. He is beginning to build churches and schools, and that is a sign of permanent establishment.

    Time will show, if the Greek becomes established here, that he will be one of the best citizens of this democratic country, which has the power and the greatness to mold all these heterogeneous masses into one new specimen of humanity, the American citizen.

    And now, to talk cold turkey, if the Greek sends $2,000,000 annually to his Mother-Greece, he must have put in motion and circulation hundreds of millions of dollars. If 75,000 Greeks in America send $2,000,000 annually to Greece, it is about $26 to each Greek, and in order to earn this sum of $26, the Greek undoubtedly has produced $300 in wealth for this country. Countries expand and become great in finance by production and comsumption.

    6

    Anyway, the Greek will continue to be taken as an example, either for good or for evil. Time will show that the Greek is not detrimental to the wealth of the land, but that on the contrary he is a producing factor. The hue and cry of the press about the impending danger will eventually die out for lack of foundation, logic, and justice.

    With unanimous voice the American press of the city and of the nation has for the last month been printing article after article about the impending danger that the wealth ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, I C
  • Greek Star -- July 08, 1904
    Chicago Greeks Form Patriotic Society, the First in the United States.

    With delight and pride the Greeks of America will hear that the Greeks of Chicago have founded a patriotic society under the name of Military Association.

    The object of this newly-organized society is to assist financially the National Defense Society of Athens, Greece. The membership fee is fifty cents per month. The accumulated money from fees and from benefit dances and similar activities of the society will be sent semi-annually to Athens without deducting any expenses for the operation of the society. The expenses of the society will be taken care of by contributions of the executive board. So every dollar collected will be sent for the national defense of Mother-Greece.

    2

    The Military Association will conduct each year a Pan-Hellenic dance, an excursion, a Lottery, and a bazaar to increase its funds. Lectures, mainly patriotic but also on social, commercial, and professional subjects will be delivered in the society's hall by prominent Greeks of Chicago and elsewhere, who will be invited for that purpose.

    At the meeting which took place yesterday all the foremost Greeks of Chicago were present, and chose by ballot the following officers and officials of the Military Association:

    Crown Prince Constantine of Greece, president; J. Georgiadis and N. Giannakopoulos (reserve officers of the Greek Army) first and second vice-presidents respectively; St. Lambardakis, general treasurer; Messrs. A. Apostolakos, N. Karellas, and K. Loumos, treasurers; Messrs. Kyriakopoulos and Koliopoulos, secretaries. Members of the board were elected as follows:

    3

    Messrs. Geo. Koutsoubos, D. Kalogeropoulos, K. Koutsogiannis, Andrew Vlachos, Christ Vretos, G. Kokinovrachos, A. Papchristofilou, B. Varelas, G. Surlis, A. Bolas, J. Demetriadis,and J. Adinamis.

    Star's Note:

    The management of this paper sincerely congratulates the initiation of this splendid idea. It is about time for the Greeks of the world to come to the assistance of Mother Greece in a Pan-Hellenic way and strengthen the treasury of that famous and glorious country.

    With delight and pride the Greeks of America will hear that the Greeks of Chicago have founded a patriotic society under the name of Military Association. The object of this ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, III B 2, IV
  • Greek Star -- September 02, 1904
    Picnic for Church Fund

    P. 3 - Native sons of Paleochorion, Kynourias, last Monday held a picnic with the object of raising money to build a new church in their native town.

    The frolic included dances, songs, music, and eatables of all kinds. Seven hundred and fifty dollars was raised at the picnic, which will be added to the $3,000 already gained in previous affairs, and the money will be sent to the local authorities of Paleochorion to begin the erection of the new church.

    Congratulations to those fellow-Greeks of ours who are interested in the welfare of those whom they left behind them!

    P. 3 - Native sons of Paleochorion, Kynourias, last Monday held a picnic with the object of raising money to build a new church in their native town. The frolic ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, II D 1, III C
  • Greek Star -- September 30, 1904
    Meeting of the Military Association

    P. 3 - A meeting of the recently organized Military Association for National Defense took place last Wednesday, and reports were made of the $3,000 already collected and of procedures and means to keep funds pouring in from everywhere.

    Among the many prominent Greeks who attended were Dr. N. Salopoulos, Consul General of Greece, Dr. G. Koromelas, who represented the Greek government in the medical convention at St. Louis, many Greek physicians, and the newly arrived Greek priest, the Reverend Father Mandelaris. Speeches were delivered by Dr. Salopoulos, the Reverend Father Georgeadis, Dr. Koromelas, the Reverend Father Mandelaris, and P. S. Lambros, publisher of the Greek Star.

    P. 3 - A meeting of the recently organized Military Association for National Defense took place last Wednesday, and reports were made of the $3,000 already collected and of procedures ...

    Greek
    II D 10, III H, I G, IV
  • Greek Star -- September 30, 1904
    Vervainon Greek Society to All Vervainiotes in America

    p. 1- We the undersigned, of the Vervainon Greek Society of Chicago, appeal to all native sons of Vervaina to contribute their share toward the building of a new church in the town where we first saw the light of day.

    We further inform you that the Chicago Vervainon Society has already on hand $3,710 collected from its members in Chicago, and since the proposed church will cost $12,000, according to the plans that we have received, every native son is urgently requested to contribute generously to the fund. All contributions should be sent to the mother-lodge of the Society in Chicago.

    N. I. Bouzos, President

    D. G. Creticos, Secretary

    Vervainon Greek Society, 404 South Halsted Street.

    Chicago, Illinois.

    p. 1- We the undersigned, of the Vervainon Greek Society of Chicago, appeal to all native sons of Vervaina to contribute their share toward the building of a new church ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, II D 1, III C, V A 1
  • Greek Star -- October 14, 1904
    Dr. Geo. Koromelas Lectures"On the Ravages of Tuberculosis" $850 Collected for the Funds of National Defense.

    p. 1.-The widely advertised lecture of Dr. George Koromelas, a specialist in tuberculosis who came to the United States to represent the Greek Government in the Medical Convention which convened in St. Louis, was delivered last Sunday to a packed audience in the hall of the National Defense Society. The theme of the lecture was "The Ravages of Tuberculosis." The audience was spell-bound by the eminent physician's elucidation of his subject. Dr. John Volicos, prominent member of the Greek community here, thanked the distinguished visitor, expressing the community's gratitude and appreciation.

    Other speakers were Messrs.P. Shoris, N. Stathacos, and that eloquent and learned member of our community, Dr. Geo. Papageorge.

    A collection was taken for national defense, and in forty-five minutes the sum of $850 was gathered.

    2

    Editor's note.

    The collection of this sum for the national defense of Greece from our fellow-Greeks in Chicago reveals once more the inherent instinct of patriotism in the breasts of the sons of Greece. The Chicago community will undoubtedly top the list of contributions for the defense of Mother-Greece. Our adopted country, America, whose principles of liberty and justice approach divinity, is proud and honored to have within its borders citizens of this kind.

    p. 1.-The widely advertised lecture of Dr. George Koromelas, a specialist in tuberculosis who came to the United States to represent the Greek Government in the Medical Convention which convened ...

    Greek
    II B 2 g, II D 10, III H, IV
  • Greek Star -- November 18, 1904
    $6,000 Collected for the Greek Navy

    p. 2- The various committees authorized to solicit contributions to the Greek Navy fund have reported to the Greek Consul General, Dr. N. Salopoulos, chairman of collections, that more than $6,000 is on hand.

    The Consul General after receiving the money will forward it to the central committee at Athens, Greece.

    p. 2- The various committees authorized to solicit contributions to the Greek Navy fund have reported to the Greek Consul General, Dr. N. Salopoulos, chairman of collections, that more than ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, I G, IV
  • Greek Star -- November 18, 1904
    The St. Anargyros Society

    p. 3- The dance given last week by the Kosmites' St. Anargyros Society was a success, and the net proceeds were $843.83. The object of the dance was to raise money to decorate the church in their native town of Kosmas, Greece. The Kosmites in Chicago have many times in the past shown their willingness to assist financially the town where they first saw the light. Great sums of money have already been forwarded by them to their birthplace for various causes. They are to be congratulated for their generous contributions.

    p. 3- The dance given last week by the Kosmites' St. Anargyros Society was a success, and the net proceeds were $843.83. The object of the dance was to raise ...

    Greek
    III H, II D 10, II D 1, V A 1, III C