The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Greek Star -- January 28, 1904
    The Greek Newspaper, the Sta (Summary)

    p. 3- With great joy, the Greeks of Chicago and in near-by States will greet the Star, a weekly Greek newspaper of Chicago, which begins publication to-day, Jan. 28th, 1904.

    The aim of this publication is to promote in particular the best interests of the Chicago Greek community and in general the interests of Greeks in all places reached by it. The publishers of this weekly, which is independent, will with all their might try to maintain the paper as an impartial servant of the masses, unaffected by any outside influence, whether political, religious, or commercial, and they will strive to keep the Star's horizon absolutely cloudless.

    The publishers are Messrs. Panagiotis S. Lambros, Demetrius Manousopoulos, and Demetrios S. Eutaxias.

    2

    The gentlemen named above are known among Greeks for their honesty, integrity, broad-mindedness, and sterling character; and they are resolved to do everything in their power to make the Chicago Greek community the Star of all communities, not only in America but in all the world.

    The Star, in New York, will be sold at 10 Madison Street, in Philadelphia at 725 Cherry Street, in Boston at 162 Richmond Street, and in St. Louis at 823 Walnut Street.

    p. 3- With great joy, the Greeks of Chicago and in near-by States will greet the Star, a weekly Greek newspaper of Chicago, which begins publication to-day, Jan. 28th, 1904. ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, IV
  • Greek Star -- January 29, 1904
    The Greek Star (Editorial)

    The Greeks of Chicago and the surrounding states will be happy to greet this first issue of The Greek Star. The purpose of this paper is to protect the fundamental human and civic rights of every individual in our Greek Community of Chicago as well as throughout the United States.

    The Greek Community of Chicago was one of the first Greek communities in America. It has been the first to champion every patriotic cause. But, it should not make any boasts because of this. On the contrary, it should endeavor, together with the Greek communities in every state, to become the proud and worthy apostle of our fatherland, Greece, among the Greeks of the United States. The Greek Community of Chicago must endeavor to develop and mold the mind and character of the younger Greek generation in America in accordance with our Greek ideals and standards. It must revive our national 2hope and quicken the hearts of all the Greek people, for, as time passes, they are inclined to forget their fatherland and all that it stands for.

    In order to accomplish all these high objectives, there is need, not only for clubs and organizations with their attendant resolutions and programs, but also a proper news organ is desirable, which will become the teacher and guardian of our Community's interests. In other words, there is a pressing need in Chicago for a newspaper which must be independent, dignified, national in scope, and imbued with highest ideals and sound policies. It must be able to assist the Community in its work and with its problems. In return, our Greek people must appreciate and respect this organ for its work and significance.

    By aligning itself with the Community, our newspaper will pursue and seek the best and highest objectives and ideals. It will endeavor to do everything that the great heritage and culture of our fathers and ancestors impose upon us. It will not spare any time or effort to exert all its powers to work 3willingly and impartially to prevent and correct every evil and every harmful thought or action. This newspaper will be merciless in its criticism and condemnation of anyone who would try or think of disturbing the peace and harmony within our community.

    We, the editors and publishers of The Greek Star, are independent in our policy and convictions. We will not be influenced by any group or vested interest. We shall endeavor to show the public that in its entire course and career The Greek Star will not be shadowed and obscured by anyone or anything.

    For these very reasons it solicits the moral and financial support of our fellow countrymen in this great American metropolis.

    Henceforth, this newspaper will guard and defend the vital interests of all of our people who are living and earning a livelihood within the framework of a great, rich, hospitable, and friendly country; such is the United States of America.

    4

    We owe it to ourselves; we owe it to Greece; we owe it to our adopted country, these United States of America, to do our very best in obeying and upholding the principles of democracy, justice, truth, law, and order.

    As a supplement to this, our first editorial, we wish to inform our readers that Messrs. Peter S. Lambros, James Manousopoulos, and James S. Eutaxias are the directors, owners, and editors of The Greek Star.

    The Greeks of Chicago and the surrounding states will be happy to greet this first issue of The Greek Star. The purpose of this paper is to protect the fundamental ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, III A, IV
  • Greek Star -- February 12, 1904
    The Greeks of Chicago

    We request all those who have been receiving The Star to send us their subscriptions. We are forced to repeat this request because we are planning to increase the size and number of our issues.

    Our friends and subscribers realize that the publication of a newspaper, which is nation-wide in scope and which has undertaken the task of keeping thousands of Greeks not only in Chicago but throughout the United States informed about developments in Greece and the life of the Greeks in America, demands a considerable expenditure and much effort.

    We hope that our people in Chicago will appreciate the importance of the work which is done by this newspaper and that they will support us financially.

    We request all those who have been receiving The Star to send us their subscriptions. We are forced to repeat this request because we are planning to increase the size ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1
  • Greek Star -- August 26, 1904
    Athenian Press's Comments on the Chicago Greek Newspaper, the Star

    P. 3 - That the Chicago Greek Star is read all over the United States is evident from its great circulation, but that it should reach the Greek capital, which has an abundance of journalistic talent, and should draw commentaries from two of the foremost Athenian dailies, was unexpected.

    The editorial articles of this newspaper have been extensively commented on by the Nation and the Eastern Mail, two of the best dailies of Athens.

    Both these sister-papers have published colorful comments on the patriotic, educational, and pro-American articles of the Chicago Greek Star.

    This unexpected attention of the press of the Greek capital to this Greek publication of Chicago is a sign of acknowledgment that the Greeks of Chicago and throughout the United States are not to be lightly considered nor underestimated as to their hidden potentialities.

    The Star warmly appreciates the comments of the Athenian newspapers and is glad to know of their interest in the Greeks of America.

    P. 3 - That the Chicago Greek Star is read all over the United States is evident from its great circulation, but that it should reach the Greek capital, which ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, III H
  • Greek Star -- April 07, 1905
    New Publication

    p. 3- As communities grow and expand, all things connected with them expand accordingly. The Greek community in Chicago is enriched by a new publication, Mikroula, issued by Mr. Pan. Shioris, a well-known member of the community.

    The offices and printing establishment of the paper are at 247 West Polk Street. The annual subscription is $1.

    p. 3- As communities grow and expand, all things connected with them expand accordingly. The Greek community in Chicago is enriched by a new publication, Mikroula, issued by Mr. Pan. ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1
  • Greek Star -- April 21, 1905
    Greek Restaurant-Keepers and Their Electric Signs

    P.1--A committee of ten representing the American and other non-Greek restaurant-keepers of Chicago came to the office of the Star last Wednesday and complained against the practice of the Greeks, who hang electric signs outside their restaurants.

    They maintained that the Greeks incur this additional overhead expense in order to advertise their places and draw more customers, and they desire that the Greeks may discontinue this unnecessary expenditure because they do not wish to slave for the Electric Company as the Greeks do. They further suggested that the Greeks appoint a committee and have a discussion with them regarding the disadvantage of the electric sign.

    Their request from the point of harmony, cooperation, and trade understanding is not without foundation; nevertheless, from a progressive business point of view, they are wrong. For progress, in business as well as in everything else, depends upon amelioration and expansion of conditions, habits, customs, and ideas. The Greek, because of his innate progressiveness, 2noticed the advantage and practicability of the newly developed electric sign and accepted the innovation in spite of the additional expense for electricity. Indeed, it is a credit to him, and in years to come those who now object to the electric sign will realize its importance and acknowledge the foresight of the Greek mind.

    To speak impartially and for the improvement of the restaurant trade and the beautification and illumination of restaurants, the electric sign is to a place of business what starch is to a white collar, or a neck-tie to a shirt.

    On the other hand, in order to disabuse the minds of those biased persons who always find something of which to accuse Greeks, and to avoid race-hatred, it will be wise for the Greek restauranteurs to appoint a committee as requested and discuss the merits and demerits, the advantages and disadvantages of the aforesaid signs, and I am certain that after the discussion the non-Greek restauranteurs will see the benefit of the electric sign and fall in line to follow the progressive Greek. If they do not do it now, most assuredly they will do it later.

    P.1--A committee of ten representing the American and other non-Greek restaurant-keepers of Chicago came to the office of the Star last Wednesday and complained against the practice of the Greeks, ...

    Greek
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 2
  • Greek Star -- May 19, 1905
    The Criminality of America's Future Will Shock World the Causes and the Remedies (Editorial)

    True to its principles, this Chicago Greek newspaper, the Star, again comes forward as the teacher and the protector of the Greeks in America. Since it is our duty to keep a vigilant eye on the welfare and the activities of the Greek element in this country, and since the life of the Greeks in America is and always will be involved with the substance of American life, we deem it to be in accordance with our ever-wakeful purpose to cast a glance into America's future and to discern what the effect will be of the past and the present trends of the people's thought.

    Our penetrating eye sees on the brilliant horizon of this great Republic the black cloud of crime, which as it expands will darken the glory of our country's history. This is not a prophesy; it is the sober visualization of what will be, in accordance with the law of cause and effect; that is, it is the result of careful analytical observation.

    2

    In writing this article we do not assume the role of critic or of counselor to the Government of the United States but simply that of an analyst who deals with this law of cause and effect and graphically displays its operation.

    No country, in spite of present greatness and glorious history, can continue to be great while the masses of the people do not think great thoughts. The thought of the people is the soul of a nation. High thoughts produce great nations. A great and glorious ruler cannot maintain greatness and glory in his domain if his people are not trained to think of greatness and glory.

    The trend of thought in America is now directed, as it has been directed for some years past, toward what history calls a "social disease," the same disease that was present in the days of Rome's decline. This social disease consists of the following elements: an unnatural desire for wealth, 3the desire for publicity, the desire for social emancipation, waste of time, lack of fixed purpose in the use of periods of leisure and diversion, facile indignation, alcoholism, and disrespect of people for law and authority. All these taken together result in degeneration, and this, enhanced by hereditary criminal tendencies, will provoke an outburst of crime that will make the most atrocious offenses of European criminals look like mild misdemeanors. America in years to come will experience a period of criminality of indescribable and unparalleled ferocity. And here is a hint to the law-makers and to the Government, and we hope that we shall not be misunderstood.

    Undoubtedly the great founders of this land of promise and of freedom meant well in enacting laws permitting all to come here, including criminals. That is in itself wonderful and Godlike. But the time is not yet ripe for these divine principles. The criminal who comes here 4cannot and will not think as the natives do. He will take advantage of the generosity of the people, of the kindness and the tolerance of the Government, and of everything good to gratify his criminal instincts. The offspring of people of this class will terrorize America in years to come. Their criminal inheritance, assisted and nourished by the intelligence of their environment and enhanced by the facilities of the country, will find vent in an outburst of crime of unprecedented violence, by which the country will be rocked as by an earthquake.

    Immigration laws should be altered so that the criminal will not find a rich and fertile field of operation and propagation of his kind in this country. It is a natural law, and common sense makes us see it, that we must remove the weeds from the soil if we want a good healthy crop of wheat.

    5

    This social disease is not a respecter of color or of race, and because of its insatiable appetite for money it will contaminate even the best society; and if its horny tentacles are not cut off in time, the youth of our best families will be ensnared by it. Its ramifications will reach and undermine the whole structure of politics and of religion as well.

    The wise law-makers of this country, I am sure, bearing in mind the social tragedies of Babylon and of Rome, will put a stop to this free admission of criminal and undesirable Europeans.

    True to its principles, this Chicago Greek newspaper, the Star, again comes forward as the teacher and the protector of the Greeks in America. Since it is our duty to ...

    Greek
    I H, II E 3, II B 2 d 1, III G, I J
  • Greek Star -- July 07, 1905
    The Elections of the Greek Community in Chicago (Editorial)

    With the approach of the elections ordered by the Court for the Greek community in Chicago it is not the business of this paper to make suggestions or to tell the people how to vote, but as conscientious journalists we deem it advisable to bring to light the doings and the misdoings of the former president of the community, Dr. G. Papaeliou, who again has the audacity to be a candidate for re-election.

    As soon as the treasury of the church became empty, after a three-year litigation through various courts, and as soon as the Appellate court confirmed the decision of the lower courts and ordered that Dr. Papaeliou should relinquish his throttling grip upon the treasury of the Church, and that new elections should be held, supervised by the court-appointed 2election commissioner or judge, and when the indignant members of the community, because of Dr. Papaeliou's mismanagement of its affairs, have begun to lose interest in the struggle for supremacy between opposing forces, our eminent doctor comes out before the public with profuse expressions of meekness and pretended obedience to the will of the people and tells them that a reorganization of the community is necessary.

    The cultured smoothness and the versatile evasiveness of the learned doctor have in the past exercised great influence upon the community, but insincere professions at last must reach an end - and when the end came, not only were Dr. Papaeliou's so-called achievements revealed as empty words, but the church's treasury was also revealed as empty. And above all, the name of the Greek community and the Church itself were dragged in the mire. These are some of Dr. Papaeliou's achievements while occupying the office of president of the Greek community. Doctor, undoubtedly you know the proverb, "Arche Andra Deixei - authority reveals the man," and by this time the community not only knows your inefficiency and incompetency in administering its affairs; it also knows the fibre of your character. A man may be excused for his ignorance and inexperience 3in piloting the ship of the community, and many times credit and honor are given to such a man when he is sincere in his efforts, but when a man of your education and social standing deliberately steers the ship on the rocks, such a man not only cannot be forgiven but rightfully draws upon himself popular condemnation.

    Dr. Papaeliou's subterfuges in the past and his utter disregard for the by-laws of the community and the wishes of the people, who by parliamentary procedure in three meetings voted against him and his associates, very clearly reveal the character of the person who was entrusted with the administration of the affairs of the community. It further reveals his unethical attitude in diminishing the Church's dignity and prestige by frequent litigation and causing several judgments to be rendered against the community. The first decision of the Court, which now is confirmed by the higher court, was to hold new elections and give an account of the community's funds. Did he abide by the Court's order? Oh no! While the treasury of the community was packed with thousands of dollars, he and his clique, having no respect for themselves, no respect for the interests and the wishes of the people, and above all 4not an iota of respect for the Greek Church, whose ministers were humiliated, preferred to appeal the case as if he had been wronged by the judgment of the lower court.

    Now when the end of his rope is around his neck, and the treasury has become as poor as a church mouse, and the judgment of the higher court has thundered over his bovine head, he sheepishly submits his case to the people of the community and hypocritically requests them to disregard all the allegations of his milignant accusers and vote for him and his group in the forth-coming elections. He promises to build a Greek hospital, a Greek school, and a magnificent church. Why, doctor, do you not derive wisdom from your past mistakes? This is absolutely absurd. With what are you going to build the proposed institutions? Thousands upon thousands of dollars have been squandered by your selfishness for your individual gain. Why did you not utilize that money for your mythical enterprises, doctor? Were you so foolish as to think that you would be able to milk the cow forever? The people are not eating hay, and by this time they know you very well.

    5

    The proposed institutions, doctor, will be built not by you but by others who are real, conscientious, patriotic Greeks. Your sun is set, doctor, not only as president of the community but as a public figure.

    Don't we know each other, doctor? Have we not had our soiled linen washed in the courts in your libel suit against the Star? Have we not had fun, doctor? When the court-room was packed by Americans, did we not make them titter? Did we not substantiate the articles which we published about your mismanagement and misappropriation of the community's funds? Were we not exonerated by the court when we presented the articles of the other Greek newspaper in Chicago, Hellas, as the source of our information? Yes, dear doctor! But as we said above at the outset of this article, because of our duty to the public as journalists we shall not cease to expose you and others of your kind when and where public interest is concerned. We shall continue, true to our principles, to inform the public whenever a public official goes astray.

    Now these are the facts concerning the administration of Dr. Papaeliou and the squandering of the community's funds, and in the forthcoming elections each and every member is requested to do his utmost to reestablish 6the legal, normal, peaceful, and beneficial administration of the community's affairs.

    Since we live in the second metropolis of the country and have a wonderful record of social and commercial progress, it would be to our advantage and to the advantage of those Americans and others whom we come in contact with to have a house-cleaning of the present administration, which on the slightest provocation and many times without any cause whatever has dragged people into court under pretence of injured dignity or to settle insignificant differences. Let us observe the outcome.

    With the approach of the elections ordered by the Court for the Greek community in Chicago it is not the business of this paper to make suggestions or to tell ...

    Greek
    III C, II B 2 d 1, I A 2 a, II D 3, II E 2, IV
  • Greek Star -- February 16, 1906
    Exposure of a Greek Publication in Chicag Deceiving the People for Gain

    p. 2- In its last issue the other Chicago Greek newspaper, Hellas, publishes something which shows very clearly the incompetence of this publication. It says, "The Greek Minister of the Interior ( called Secretary in the U. S.' Government has requested Hellas to compile statistics of the Greek element living in the States of Illinois and California. We therefore request all fellow-Greeks, especially businessmen of the two aforesaid States, to report to our offices their names, their addresses, what kind of business they are engaged in, how long a time they have lived in America, and what part of Greece they came from."

    The Star, as guardian of the Greeks in America, has applied its common sense to the consideration of this unusual, unpractical, and anomalous procedure with the following results. According to Hellas's statement the Minister of the Interior has undertaken to function as Minister of Affairs (Secretary of State), a thing which it is not proper for the 2Minister of the Interior to do. We also observe that the Greek Minister of the Interior did not, as he ought to have done, address the Greek consuls of the two States, who are the proper persons and the officials duly qualified to compile the statistics requested. You see the anomaly of the whole affair. Our common sense tells us that such procedure is unusual, improper, and without precedent.

    In order to confute our reasoning and to compel the Star to discontinue its commonsense method of procedure, our sister journal is asked to publish the purported request of the Minister of the Interior. This will never be done, for no such request was sent to the Chicago Greek newspaper by any constituted authority in Greece.

    And we venture to say, again applying our common-sense logic, that our sister journal is fishing for business, hastening to add that this is a very poor journalistic method of doing it. The Star for the sake of decency urges Hellas to discontinue such methods of deception, for otherwise its disqualification as a reliable newspaper will ensue.

    p. 2- In its last issue the other Chicago Greek newspaper, Hellas, publishes something which shows very clearly the incompetence of this publication. It says, "The Greek Minister of the ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, III H
  • Greek Star -- March 09, 1906
    The Duty of the Greek Press in America Hellas Revokes its Announcement-Pleasing Occurence (Editorial)

    We are very happy to read that Hellas, our sister Greek paper in Chicago, in plain and unequivoral language revokes its announcement regarding the purported request of the Greek Minister of the Interior, who according to this Chicago Greek publication had delegated Hellas to compile statistics of our fellow-Greeks residing in Illinois and in the State of California. The Star in previous issues urged its sister paper for the sake of journalistic principle, to abandon such forms of deception. Our suggestions were accepted, our logic was heeded, and with real joy we read the withdrawal of the announcement in the column of our sister paper. This ends the discussion of the matter, and we call it felicitous ending.

    The Greek press in the United States, in our conception, has a sacred duty to perform. That duty is above material gain and above anything else. The duty is to guard and to guide our fellow-Greeks in America and to exalt the honor of the Greek name. By doing that we not only benefit enormously the Greek element of our population, but we also automatically become patent factors in benefiting our adopted country. The real prosperity of a country depends upon the enlightement of its citizens. And here in America, which is called because of its heterogeneous masses the international 2melting-pot, the future citizen of Greek extraction, who will ultimately be an integral part of the whole, needs much more guardianship and guidance than he would need in any other country.

    The duty of the Greek press is to illumine the minds of the greenhorns, the frantics, the uniformed, the deluded, and all others that need enlightenment, teaching them that Americanization is not in the same category with Bulgarization or Turcofication but is a real liberation of the individual. It means freedom and justice. Many of our fellow-Greeks, extremely conscientious also extremely but narrow-minded, live in perpetual dread because of their lack of understanding. The thought of forsaking his beloved Greece and his traditions and becoming a citizen of the United States tortures the mind of the uniformed Greek.

    It is the duty of the press to disabuse the minds of those so afflicted and to prove by systematic explanation what Americanization means.

    In order to command the respect of the public and to accomplish its journalistic purpose, the Greek press in America must be guiltless of any desire to deceive and true to its own principles, an example to guard and to guide our fellow-Greeks in 3America. If we desire to perpetuate the immortal Greek leaven in the American bodies and souls of our future generation, we must keep a vigilant eye on the welfare of the Greeks in America and on the sacredness of the Greek name.

    We are very happy to read that Hellas, our sister Greek paper in Chicago, in plain and unequivoral language revokes its announcement regarding the purported request of the Greek Minister ...

    Greek
    II B 2 d 1, III A, III G, III H, I J