The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    Chicago Grocers against Greek Peddlers Judge Hurley Heaps Insults on Greeks - Greek Consul-General Inquires - Judge Retracts His Statements

    p. 2- A committee of Chicago grocers last week declared war to the finish on Greek vegetable and fruit peddlers, accusing them of being the parasites of the trade and requesting the city council to prohibit peddlers from selling merchandise in streets and alleys or to impose a heavy license-fee on them so that they may quit acting as leeches.

    So great was the effect of the grocers' war on the Greeks that Judge Hurley from the bench cast wantonly violent insults right and left at Greeks in general as he delivered his judicial decision to the six Greek defendants (newly-arrived immigrants) who were before him for disobeying a police ordinance.

    2

    The Greek Consul-General, Dr. N. Salopoulos, who is distinguished for his academic learning, dignity, and sanity, has written a letter to the American Jurist calling its attention to certain facts and pointing out that the accusations against the Greeks were wholly unjust. The Consul's letter, which was published by the press of the city, brought results, and His Honor publicly retracted his statements.

    That closes the incident of the insult to Greeks, which was absolutely unwarranted; but the grocers want the Greek leeches off the streets. The war is on against the poor unorganized Greek peddlers. The grocers are organized, and consequently their voice is the louder.

    Of course the Greeks, who are determined to make an honest living, are not so easy to deal with. Their argument is that they, the Greeks, facilitate buying for housewives, and these in turn are in favor of the Greek peddlers and their strictly fresh and seasonable merchandise, which is also according to the housewives, much cheaper.

    3

    If logic means anything, I am inclined to believe that the housewives will win. The Greeks are cultivating the good will of these, their daily customers.

    On the other hand the poor grocers are to be pitied because they are losing business, and something ought to be done before these Greeks ruin them. The way is open for the grocers; let them compete with the Greeks, and the better man shall win. That is the clean, pure spirit of business, honest competition.

    p. 2- A committee of Chicago grocers last week declared war to the finish on Greek vegetable and fruit peddlers, accusing them of being the parasites of the trade and ...

    Greek
    II A 2, I C
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    The Greek Confectioners Chicago the Mecca of the Candy Business

    p. 2- Practically every busy corner in Chicago is occupied by a Greek candy store. Their perfect cleanliness and their elaborate method of making pure and delicious candies have made the Greeks the predominant factor in that line of business.

    An impartial investigation reveals the indisputable fact that the Greeks are the fathers of the present candy industry.

    What kind of candy store did we have here before the Greeks began to monopolize the trade? Where was candy sold, and what kind of candy? Old-timers know and remember where it was sold, and what kind of candy it was before the Greeks developed and expanded the manufacture and sale of confectionery.

    2

    The Greek confectioners are Chicago's pride, and Chicago is the pride of two thirds of the country. Chicago, not New York, has the credit of being the city of candy-makers. Seventy per cent of the Greek candy-merchants in America were originally citizens of Chicago. After they had learned the trade of fellow-Greeks for whom they worked and by saving had accumulated enough capital, they bade Chicago farewell and scattered to the four corners of this great country.

    Each and every one of them, with Chicago money and Chicago training in the art of candy-making, found the city which suited him, and a new and up-to-date store in the Chicago style sprang up at the busy corner of that city. Now the rest of the story is easy. More Greeks came along and learned the trade, and the whole country is sweetened by the exquisite art of the Greek confectioner.

    Inevitably Chicago became the center of supply for all these new stores all over the western and southern states. New industries sprang up here to supply the candy-makers' demands as they accelerated the development 3of the confectioner's business. Chicago firms have hundreds of traveling salesmen to supply these Greek confectioneries with the needs of the trade. This kind of business and such an activity did not exist before the Greeks tempted and sweetened the tooth of the country.

    One of the wholesale dealers in Chicago, Mr. Christ Vlachandreas, of North Dearborn Street, who deals in extracts, travels far and wide, and because of his Greek shrewdness and by impersonating a Frenchman in talk, action, etc., he has discovered the real feelings of people in general toward the Greeks. In every state where he travels he cunningly directs his conversation toward the Greek confectioners and the Greeks in general. His ears are tickled with eulogies of the Greeks; he learns that they are clean, industrious, peaceable, law-abiding, honest people. The above qualities are all correctly and rightfully attributed to the Greeks. A big merchant in a western state told Mr. Vlachandreas that the Greeks in his town are the best specimens of human beings with some exceptions; that is, "they love wine, women, and cards." Of course we as Greeks know the wise saying of our ancestors, "nothing to excess," and accordingly we should govern and moderate our desires and our predilections.

    4

    And in order to maintain this good name which we enjoy everywhere, we must keep on endeavoring to surpass our record, rising from better to best and up to higher levels.

    Well, are we going to shine only in one trade or line of business? Could Greeks tackle anything else and leave it undeveloped? Of course not! Let us make another record in some other line of business as yet undeveloped. The restaurant business in Chicago and elsewhere is growing very rapidly, and it will not be long before the Greeks will claim a monopoly on the heretofore undeveloped business of catering.

    p. 2- Practically every busy corner in Chicago is occupied by a Greek candy store. Their perfect cleanliness and their elaborate method of making pure and delicious candies have made ...

    Greek
    II A 2, IV
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    Believe it or Not.

    John Michalopoulos, a harness-maker at 68 Blue Island Avenue, who recently came to Chicago and opened a shop to ply his trade, has a big sign before his establishment which reads as follows:

    "We will make you the best harness. We take your measurement and guarantee the fit. Our harnesses are soft and pliable and do not irritate the neck. Give us a trial, and you will be convinced of their superior quality. Get yours to-day."

    John Michalopoulos, a harness-maker at 68 Blue Island Avenue, who recently came to Chicago and opened a shop to ply his trade, has a big sign before his establishment which ...

    Greek
    II A 2, V B
  • Greek Star -- April 22, 1904
    Fruit-Dealers' Association Greeks Organized to Defend Themselves

    p. 2- Not long ago Greek fruit-peddlers in Chicago were made the target of a war to the finish, directed by the Grocers' Association. The street fruit-peddlers were accused of taking trade away from the legitimate grocers. The Greeks, reinforced by the housewives' cooperation, won the war, and in order to avoid further attacks, they have organized themselves and have become members of the Fruit-Dealers' Association, which includes all the Greeks who deal in fruit.

    Star's notice:

    If, according to the Grocers' Association, might is right, the fruit-peddlers, in the future, will not be molested, since their association is the stronger, and on the other hand, if right is might, the fruit-peddlers again will not be annoyed, since their action is lawful and just. So in either case the housewives will continue to buy their fruit and vegetables of the Greek peddlers if quality and price are better than what the grocers have to offer.

    p. 2- Not long ago Greek fruit-peddlers in Chicago were made the target of a war to the finish, directed by the Grocers' Association. The street fruit-peddlers were accused of ...

    Greek
    II A 2, III A
  • Greek Star -- July 22, 1904
    Lynch Law Among the West Side Greeks.

    Undoubtedly some of the Greeks of Chicago follow American habits and customs letter for letter. Unfortunately they follow the bad customs instead of the good ones, which are numerous and far superior to those of any other nationality.

    We know as a matter of fact that the majority of the foreigners in this country, when they begin to learn English, first pick up the foul words of the language, and so the Greeks of the West Side, or at least a group of them (fruit-dealers) before beginning to open their eyes in the rebirth of Americanization, have adopted lynch law, the barbarous custom of the South. Of course the law of initiation has a great effect upon intelligent and non-intelligent alike.

    2

    A couple of weeks ago an ignorant Greek fruit-peddler beat an urchin for stealing his fruit. The youthful hoodlum cried and accused the Greek of beating him without cause. An infuriated mob surrounded the Greek with cries of "Lynch him! Lynch him!" and gave him a terrible beating. If the law of the land had not intervened, the ignorant Greek would have been a spirit by this time. So it was that the friends of the abused Greek learned about lynching the custom of the South. Last Saturday, they were treating a certain Miller, the leader of the previous attempt at lynching, a la South, they were scattered by the riot squad fifteen strong, which had responded to the frenzied calls of Miller's friends that the Greeks were on the war-path.

    3

    Editor's Note:

    It is an utter shame that we should resort to things of this kind. Those Greeks who participated in that unpleasnat affair should bear in mind that they will get justice when they apply to any American Court. Intelligent, civilized people never take the law in their hands, in opposition and contempt of the law of the land. Only fanatics and their blood-relations, semi-barbarians resort to lynch law.

    In our next issue we shall write more extensively of this Southern tradition.

    Undoubtedly some of the Greeks of Chicago follow American habits and customs letter for letter. Unfortunately they follow the bad customs instead of the good ones, which are numerous and ...

    Greek
    II E 2, II A 2, I C
  • Greek Star -- July 29, 1904
    A New Carpenter's Shop.

    Mr. Pan Kotsinis, who recently arrived from New York, informs the Greek community of Chicago that he is establishing a carpenter's shop at 320 South Halsted Street.

    Since Mr. Kotsinis is an expert in his line of business, he will undertake any kind of a job (small store or large) which requires the best of workmanship at reasonable prices.

    Mr. Pan Kotsinis, who recently arrived from New York, informs the Greek community of Chicago that he is establishing a carpenter's shop at 320 South Halsted Street. Since Mr. Kotsinis ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Greek Star -- September 02, 1904
    Announcement to the Greek Confectioners in Chicago and Elsewhere

    P. 3 - Due to the fact that we are the only manufacturers and wholesale distributors of the delicious and palatable confection "Sour Crout" in Chicago, we inform the Greek confectioners throughout the country that we ship orders anywhere in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Our quality is guaranteed to be the purest and the best. All orders should be sent to our new factory at 6306 Ingleside Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

    Geo. Karambis and Company.

    P. 3 - Due to the fact that we are the only manufacturers and wholesale distributors of the delicious and palatable confection "Sour Crout" in Chicago, we inform the Greek ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Greek Star -- September 02, 1904
    A New Flower Shop $9,000 a Year Rental

    p. 3- Mr. John Maropoulos, an enterprising young Greek, has opened an up-to-date florist's shop at the corner of Adams Street and Wabash Avenue.

    Although the year's rental for the store is $9,000, Mr. Maropoulos says, "There is plenty of money in flowers."

    We wish him the utmost success.

    p. 3- Mr. John Maropoulos, an enterprising young Greek, has opened an up-to-date florist's shop at the corner of Adams Street and Wabash Avenue. Although the year's rental for the ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Greek Star -- September 09, 1904
    Fire Insurance

    P. 2 - Mr. Leonidas Papademetriou, attorney and notary, announces to the Greeks of Chicago and suburbs that he is general agent for the Greek division of all fire insurance companies. His office, located at 107 Dearborn Street, underwrites any amount of fire insurance for stores, shops, dwellings, etc.

    Mr. Papademetriou will be delighted to serve those who need protection for their property. Rooms 26-28, Telephone Central 5813.

    P. 2 - Mr. Leonidas Papademetriou, attorney and notary, announces to the Greeks of Chicago and suburbs that he is general agent for the Greek division of all fire insurance ...

    Greek
    II A 2
  • Greek Star -- February 17, 1905
    Star's Recommendations to Our Readers.

    P. 2-We are pleased to recommend to our readers all over the country the following persons: Mr. Panagiotis Chiotis, representing the firm of Walsh, Boyle and Company, South Water and State streets, Chicago, Illinois; Mr. Louis Pappas, representing the great American Soda Fountain Company, 39th street and Indiana avenue, Chicago, Illinois; and Dr. J. E. Thompson, the founder of the Greek clinic in New York, 334 West 29th street, New York City.

    P. 2-We are pleased to recommend to our readers all over the country the following persons: Mr. Panagiotis Chiotis, representing the firm of Walsh, Boyle and Company, South Water and ...

    Greek
    II A 2, II A 1