The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Greek Star -- April 15, 1904
    The Strike in Chicago Ended. the Greek Strike-Breakers Ousted. Union President Sympathetic

    (Editorial)

    The two-month strike at the Diesel shops ended to-day, and the Greeks who took the jobs of the union men were ousted. The president of the union paid us a visit at our offices and discussed the action of the Greek workers who created an unpleasant situation because of their ignorance, stupidity, and lack of organization. His argument revealed the extent of his reasonableness, his knowledge, his lerance, and his sympathy for the ousted Greek strike-breakers.

    The gentlemen recognized and admitted the fact that the newly-arrived Greek immigrants, who took the jobs of the strikers, did not know what it was all about. Jobs, a chance to make a living, were offered to them by their exploiting leaders, who were the tools of the factory-owners, and the ignorant immigrants accepted. Very naturally the poor Greeks were misled and took the bread and butter away from the families of the union people who were striking for higher wages.

    2

    This serves to show that the Greeks in this country ought to be organized and educated in American methods of making a living in order that they may avoid causing harm to their fellow-workers. The factory-owners, through their agents gave jobs to the inexperienced Greeks, who because of their ignorance of conditions were handled like sheep being herded to pasture.

    As the president of the union admitted, the higher-ups are to blame, and not the newly-arrived Greek immigrants who had come to the land of plenty to make a living;nevertheless Greeks in general were stigmatized. The Greek community in Chicago, the various societies and organizations, and the Church must take steps to guide properly such new arrivals and protect the Greek name from further attack. Our unskilled laborers ought to be educated by lectures and by other appropriate means.

    3

    What a hue and cry we should raise if our families were starved by others! Let us educate ourselves recognize the fact that the prosperity and welfare of our family depend upon the prosperity and well-being of our neighbors. Our neighbors, who are workingmen as we are, belong to unions, and they are fighting for higher wages to improve the standard of living of the working class. By taking their jobs when they strike, we commit an offense against them and against ourselves.

    Let us not in the future repeat this blunder and create so unpleasant a situation for all concerned. Americanization is the star that will guide us to prosperity, success, and progress Let us all adopt this great country as our own. Let us be part of this land of plenty and not remain predatory aliens. America opens her arms to us. Let us embrace her with love and desire to understand her and her laws, political and social alike.

    (Editorial) The two-month strike at the Diesel shops ended to-day, and the Greeks who took the jobs of the union men were ousted. The president of the union paid us ...

    Greek
    I D 2 a 4, I A 3, III A, I C
  • Greek Star -- August 05, 1904
    Educating the Greek Immigrant to Be Good and Useful Citizen-Americanization and the Lynch Law International Melting Pot (Editorial)

    Good is made and not born. When we explore the universe to discover and define good and evil, we are confronted with this immutable and infallible natural truth, that good and evil are the result of wisdom or of the want of it. Both good and evil serve the interests of mankind. Individuals, tribes, and nations have their own particular standards of good and evil. No universal standard exists. Many things which in one place are considered to be good are in another place not so considered. The morals, the laws, and many other things in one country may be the extreme opposites of the same things in another country. And the good citizen of one country might not be a good citizen in another country.

    2

    Now when to this land of the free and the prosperous, this land of the best civilized of peoples, the Greek immigrant comes to make his living, he may be and is a good citizen in his own environment, and his character to a great degree has already been molded. In the small village where he was reared he was taught not to steal, not to get drunk, to honor and revere family life, to obey the laws of his country, and to work hard at any kind of job in order to make his living. He was taught that work is not a disgrace, but that idleness is. His religion is part of his being. In the very little schooling which he received he was fanatically taught to defend his country and everything Greek. His etiquette and every other constituent element of his life have been made and molded to fit his narrow, limited circle. Living and functioning in his own country and in his own particular environment, he unquestionably is a good citizen.

    And when he arrives in America he naturally attempts to function, with certain reservations, in his own accustomed way. Is he to blame for this? By no means! He came here to earn some American dollars at any kind of job because he has had no training and has no vocation.

    3

    He resides with other Greeks of his kind because like attracts like, and he begins to learn a few words of English in order to apply for a job. Many unpleasant incidents take place when the poor, ignorant immigrant Greek attempts to use his first acquirements in the language of the land. The rascality of his mischievous compatriots in teaching him ("just for fun," as they say) the wrong words leads the blind bundle of humanity astray. Many improper and indecent words are unconsciously spoken by the ABC pupil in American life and environment.

    Where are our societies to educate and look after the newcomer who by his ignorance may cause unpleasant occurrences which reflect upon Greek businessmen, upon the Greek name, and upon the Greek nation? We have to educate the newcomer and adjust him to American life and enlightenment. Why, not very long ago three hundred Greeks, like a flock of sheep, were huddled by their crooked leaders into the packing-houses to break a strike!

    4

    Are the ignorant un-Americanized Greeks to blame? They do not know what a strike is, and above all they were not told that this was a strike undertaken by fellow-workers to improve conditions. The crooked agents took advantage of the Greeks' necessity, ignorance, and eagerness to earn money to take care of their poor families in Greece and caused them to be stigmatized as strike-breakers and consequently to become hated by the populace, which does not stop to weigh evidence impartially. The Greek was offered a job, a chance to earn money to feed his needy family. He trusted his compatriots, the agents, who in their greed exploited him, forgetting the high principles of the race. Can any sane and impartial observer blame these three hundred Greeks, who were thrown out of a job when the strike ended? No! But nevertheless all these Greeks were stigmatized, and many unjust and inexcusable expressions of hatred, mockery, and ridicule were printed in the dailies.

    The necessity for such a society to Americanize the newcomer is imperative. It is not only beneficial to the individual to be educated in Americanism, but it is beneficial to us all, to our race, to our Mother-Greece, and above all to the American commonwealth. Have we such a society? Unfortunately, no.

    5

    It is about time, if the Greeks in America wish to become distinguished, prosperous, and really good citizens and to live in harmony with their American environment, to begin to educate and look after the uninitiated - the Greek newcomers.

    The newcomer's first and second year in America under the guiding hand of the proposed society would have a great influence upon his future life.

    It is the duty of businessmen, of professional men, and of the Church to form such societies, at first in big cities and in great industrial centers and later everywhere.

    The American type, in my opinion, is the best type in political and social life the world over. But in spite of my love for this country and my devotion to it I am not satisfied with the ways and means employed to Americanize immigrants.

    6

    Giving correct answers to the naturalization examiner's questions and raising the hand to take an oath are not all that constitutes Americanization. The four-year period is not enough to mold the individuals of the heterogeneous mass of immigrants into a new type of man.

    "America the Great" is not a homogeneous mass but a conglomeration, an international melting-pot. The habits, the traditions, the creeds, the national fanaticism, and the standards of life of all this heterogeneous mass cannot be changed and altered into Americanism by the simple acquisition of the first and second papers of naturalization any more than a pagan could become a Christian by simply being baptized and hearing a few words mumbled by the officiating priest. The first and the second, the newly-made American and the newly-made Christian, are so in name only.

    In my opinion a man should be honored with the name "American" who truly loves America and American idealism,and who is therefore ready to defend this country with the sacrifice of his life. Anything short of that, in my opinion, is balderdash, mockery, exploitation, forgery, and deception.

    7

    He who is "American" and does not salute the Stars and Stripes because of religious scruples is not truly an American. He who is not willing to fight for America because of religious scruples or for any other reason is not a true American. He has become naturalized not for love of America and of the great American idealism but with some other motive.

    Why should America shed her blood to protect him if he does not stand ready to defend America when there is need? If America were invaded and enslaved by an oppressor, would he continue to be an "American?" No! By the name of Zeus, no! He will change color, nationality, and religion as quickly as he changes his shirt.

    This type of person, in my opinion, is not included in the glorious register of Americans. He is "American" (qualified by his naturalization papers) in name only, not in body and soul. Americanism is composed of noble and lofty ideals and principles. It is not an empty appellation without life, vitality, and force but on the contrary the living substance of the best and the loftiest thoughts of mankind.

    8

    We have thousands upon thousands of citizens - naturalized citizens - who are opposed, and very much opposed, to patriotism, advocating in colleges and universities "cosmopolitanism." This philosophic doctrine may be right, and it is right in the last analysis, but the world in general is not yet ripe for cosmopolitanism. And since this delicious fruit of Utopia is not yet developed and ripe, it is not wise nor safe nor beneficial to the world to pluck it for consumption. Therefore patriotism at all costs must be maintained as the fundamental base, pillar, and structure of a nation. In the present stage of our evolution, while my next-door neighbor has the manners of a Turk, it would be folly and treason to disarm the patriotic citizen. And those in America to-day who do not advocate and encourage patriotism are, in my opinion, Americans in name only.

    Those uninformed three hundred Greeks who recently accepted jobs as strikebreakers may be and are greenhorns, very, very far from measuring up to the standard of American life, political and social, but they are imbued body and soul with patriotism; and time will show, when America calls them 9to protect her, that in spite of all their shortcomings they will be in the country's first line of defense. The integrity, prestige, honor, and safety of the country depend absolutely on citizens who are patriots.

    Fortunately for America, the mother of a new race under the sun, and fortunately for the world in general, we have many true American patriots who will guide this country in attaining the heights of its destiny.

    One blemish still remains to mar the perfection of American progress, civilization, and justice, and that is the lynch law.

    In my opinion this is an outworn and out-of-date tradition. Lynching, in the past, was absolutely necessary. Established authority and courts, in the times when lynching originated, were far apart, and naturally it was necessary to administer justice where the culprit committed his crime. The spirited and law-loving citizens of those districts where lynching prevailed, since there were many impediments to legal procedure, took 10the trouble to administer justice by applying the lynch law; and indeed it was the quickest and the most effective way to punish the perpetrator of a crime against society. In those times they did not hang an innocent person; they hanged those who defied society and its established laws. All very well; the South was rid of law-breakers. But the necessity which existed at that time exists no longer. The country is developed; in all parts of it there are courts and authority legally established, and such law enforcement is not necessary to-day. The legalized justice of the courts must be supreme in the United States. Any other justice is contrary to the dignity and integrity of the courts and the people of the Republic.

    Every nation on earth has had a lynch law and still has one, but only in time of war; and the law is executed not by the populace but by the military authorities. These facts are familiar to us all.

    I doubt very much that real and true Americans to-day take part in lynchings. In the South I must admit that lynchings are performed by genuine Americans, for tradition is still very strong among those law-abiding, 11law-respecting, honest-to-goodness Southerners; but in the North it seems to me that it is a different story. Some would-be Americans abuse the Southern tradition and incite riots which are very detrimental to the nation's good name. For instance, not very long ago a Greek immigrant on the West Side was almost lynched by an infuriated mob of what appeared to be American people. Our correspondent, who was present at the scene of the outrage, emphatically stated that the majority of the would-be lynchers were unable to speak English. For the sake of decency I refrain from mentioning of what races they were who took part in the attack on the Greek. Are these Americans? If they have their naturalization papers, to be sure, they are Americans, but, in my opinion, Americans in name only.

    Let us hope that this stain upon the brightness of American civilization will be wiped away, and that due respect and honor will be accorded to American jurisprudence and to the American people in general. Very many distinguished Americans all over the country share the same opinion, and I am certain that the time is near at hand when the whole country will agree with these great and far-sighted American patriots.

    12

    The melting-pot of America the Great, which receives, holds, transforms, and molds the heterogeneous masses of mankind, will continue to do its God-given duty for the benefit of humanity, and in the years to come the Greek, the Jew, and many other peoples with deep-rooted traditions, racial and religious, will face one another with souls reborn. And out of this ever-active America God has predestined that a new type of mankind shall be produced, a type that will enlighten all the world.

    Greece, in the past, civilized the barbarians. America, the daughter of ancient Greece, to-day is civilizing the civilized people, and the America of to-morrow will lead all the world to unimagined heights of civilization and enlightenment.

    Good is made and not born. When we explore the universe to discover and define good and evil, we are confronted with this immutable and infallible natural truth, that good ...

    Greek
    III A, I D 2 a 4, I A 1 a, III G, III H, I C, I G, I H, I J
  • Greek Star -- August 26, 1904
    General Gathering of Greek Businessmen of Chicago to Protect Their Business and the Greek Name - Consul General Interested

    P. 1 - The meeting of Greek businessmen last Sunday packed the Greek Orthodox church. The object of the meeting was to find ways and means to protect their business and their racial prestige against attacks by the Chicago press arising from the conduct of 320 Greeks who accepted jobs as strike-breakers.

    Chicago newspapers have raised a hue and cry against Greeks in general, not taking into consideration the facts that by so doing they injure the business of Greeks who are not engaged in strike-breaking, and that they are also throwing mud at a nation friendly to this Republic.

    Immediately after the ceremony of the mass, in which over 2,000 took part, the Reverend C. Georgiadis spoke. In a fatherly but businesslike address he brought out what the duties of the Greek businessmen of Chicago are toward those unwise Greek laborers who because of extreme necessity consented to be stigmatized as strike-breakers, taking the bread and butter away from families of their fellow-workers who had struck for higher wages. He further suggested that 2immediate steps should be taken to approach these misinformed Greek laborers and induce them for the sake of the Greek name and likewise for the sake of the strikers' families to abandon their temporary jobs.

    The Hon. Dr. N. Salopoulos, Greek Consul General in Chicago, next took the floor and reminded the businessmen that besides the injury to their business the national prestige of Greece has suffered. He consented to head a committee to carry out Father Georgiadis' suggestions; during the day he visited the strike-breakers, and 120 of them gave up their jobs at once.

    Other speakers at the meeting were Messrs. N. Stathakos, D. Kalogeropoulos, A. Papachristofilou, and N. Kontaxis, who very explicitly analyzed the situation and suggested means by which such unpleasant occurrences might be avoided hereafter.

    Star's note:

    This newspaper has time and time again trumpeted in the ears of all concerned the paramount necessity of establishing a society to initiate immigrants into 3American life and look after them until they know what is all about. I do not approve of the press's indiscriminate attack on Greeks; nevertheless, in view of the present disagreeable situation created by the sensation-mongering press, it will be to our advantage to correct our negligence and do the right thing by our greenhorn immigrants.

    P. 1 - The meeting of Greek businessmen last Sunday packed the Greek Orthodox church. The object of the meeting was to find ways and means to protect their business ...

    Greek
    I D 2 a 4, III A, III C, III G, III H, I C, IV
  • Greek Star -- September 02, 1904
    The City Newspapers and the Greek Priest

    p. 2- A couple of Chicago newspapers have unwisely and unprofessionally reported the supposed utterances of the Greek priest at the meeting of Greek businessmen last Sunday in the Greek Orthodox Church.

    The pious and popular Father Georgeadis, at the meeting of businessmen, in which 2,000 participated, delivered a speech enjoining patience, tolerance, obedience to social and civil law, and above all immediate consideration for the families of the packing-house strikers. He suggested that a committee of prominent Greeks should be formed, headed by the Consul General, to visit these fellow-Greeks of ours who took jobs there as strike-breakers and to induce them, for the sake of the strikers' families, for the sake of the injured business of their fellow-Greeks, and for the sake of the Greek race to abandon their temporary jobs, adding that they would have the blessing of the Church.

    The newspapers printed among other things unbecoming to the dignity of the Church a statement that the Greek priest, the Reverend Father Georgeadis, 2had threatened the strike-breakers that if they did not abandon their jobs at once, he would bar them from communion....

    This statement is utterly untrue. When we interviewed our sister-publications and inquired about the source of their information, the answer was that some Greeks who were present at the meeting had told them what Father Georgeadis had said.

    Excellent journalism, eh? An admirable way to get news of a meeting! And an admirable thing to do, to drag the Church and its servants into disputes of this kind! I suggest for the dignity of the profession of journalism that professional methods of obtaining news be adopted.

    p. 2- A couple of Chicago newspapers have unwisely and unprofessionally reported the supposed utterances of the Greek priest at the meeting of Greek businessmen last Sunday in the Greek ...

    Greek
    III C, I D 2 a 4, I C
  • Greek Star -- September 09, 1904
    The Greek Consul Corrects the Inaccuracies of the Press

    P. 1 - Because of the activity of Dr. N. Salopoulos, Greek Consul General in Chicago and head of the committee of prominent Greeks who persuaded a third of the Greek strike-breakers to give up their jobs, the Chicago Inter Ocean and other dailies have published articles of some length criticizing the Greek diplomat as "meddling in the local affairs of the city."

    Dr. Salopoulos in an official letter to the above-mentioned paper has corrected the inaccuracies of the articles published by it and by other journals, calling attention to the fact that he is neither for nor against the packing-house strike but is very much interested in upholding the dignity and prestige of the nation which he represents.

    P. 1 - Because of the activity of Dr. N. Salopoulos, Greek Consul General in Chicago and head of the committee of prominent Greeks who persuaded a third of the ...

    Greek
    I D 2 a 4, IV, I C
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- March 02, 1918
    What Every Man Should Do for the Sake of His Own Interest (The Committee on National Preparedness)

    We are pleased to publish the following statement of the Committee on National Preparedness:

    "On this day, a critical moment in the nation's history, Germany is endeavoring in every possible way to make traitors of the American workers.

    "What is the use of sending our sons to the war front, when we are bent on betraying them by not sending ammunition, which we have ceased manufacturing?

    "By confusion and various other methods, Germany is seeking to retard our preparation for war. The entire American nation is fighting for its freedom and independence, which we will lose, if defeated. We must all work to preserve our good fortune; each strike means the 2murder of our brothers and our own suicide.

    "Why talk about increasing wages and reduction of working hours, when the enemy is about to win the war? The slaves of America lived better than the prisoners of Belgium, who are living and working in the various German factories and mines. The prisoners of Belgium are being beaten and brutally handled, while working as unfortunate slaves of the Germans. Who wants to support a pitiless tyrant that seeks to subjugate so good a people?

    "The faithful and honest worker who remains faithful to his work is offering the greatest service to himself and to his country. How can one be called a man, when he sells his manliness, and directly or indirectly betrays his country? What liberty-loving worker can tolerate the sight of the oppressed Belgian people? These people cannot win their freedom by being left to perish, or by seeing the Allies defeated.

    "Let us all remain firm in our determination to work faithfully and 3loyally, especially those of us who are working for the government, in order to safeguard our life, honor, and property, together with our freedom, which are threatened by the brutal and inhuman German slave drivers."

    We are pleased to publish the following statement of the Committee on National Preparedness: "On this day, a critical moment in the nation's history, Germany is endeavoring in every possible ...

    Greek
    I G, I D 2 a 4
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- July 10, 1929
    The Law on Communism --By K. Benizelos

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but to organize the means needed for enforcing and strengthening any overthrow they are planning; it has the status quo of an infant when left alone to feed and preserve itself.

    This is the substance of the situation, as someone said, and from this knowledge, the Government asks you to vote this law, believing that your votes will be of the utmost use, because up till today all governments realize that if we don't turn communistic energies away from governing bodies, business will be at a standstill.

    We must prevent this! We must refer these injustices to the courts. That is the course we are pursuing. You tell me our future is not in peril. I believe that--but it isn't possible for a self-respecting duty--conscious Government to stand aside every time a strike occurs and watch the communistic factors intervene and push the workers into differences which will result in riot and bloodshed'.

    2

    It is my belief that the Communistic Party is an enemy to the working class. Whenever a strike occurs, the Communists are always there doing their best to ensnare workers and employers, seeing how many victims they can add to their lists. We all know that and that is what is behind every strike.

    We know very well that this party receives orders from outside and has no other purpose than to cause a split between employer and employee and their joy is unbounded if a strike fails and the workers return to their jobs, discouraged and with bitterness in their hearts. These are the reasons we want your vote on the Communistic Bill.

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but ...

    Greek
    I E, I D 2 a 4
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- July 10, 1929
    The Law on Communis --By K. Benizelos

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but to organize the means needed for enforcing and strengthening any overthrow they are planning; it has the status quo of an infant when left alone to feed and preserve itself.

    This is the substance of the situation, as someone said, and from this knowledge, the Government asks you to vote this law, believing that your votes will be of the utmost use, because up till today all governments realize that if we don't turn communistic energies away from governing bodies, business will be at a standstill.

    We must prevent this! We must refer these injustices to the courts. That is the course we are pursuing. You tell me our future is not in peril. I believe that--but it isn't possible for a self-respecting duty-conscious Government to stand aside every time a strike occurs and watch the communistic factors intervene and push the workers into differences which will result in riot and bloodshed'.

    2

    It is my belief that the Communistic Party is an enemy to the working class. Whenever a strike occurs, the Communists are always there doing their best to ensnare workers and employers, seeing how many victims they can add to their lists. We all know that and that is what is behind every strike.

    We know very well that this party receives orders from outside and has no other purpose than to cause a split between employer and employee and their joy is unbounded if a strike fails and the workers return to their jobs, discouraged and with bitterness in their hearts. These are the reasons we want your vote on the Communistic Bill.

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but ...

    Greek
    I E, I D 2 a 4
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- July 10, 1929
    The Law on Communism --By K. Benizelos

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but to organize the means needed for enforcing and strengthening any overthrow they are planning; it has the status quo of an infant when left alone to feed and preserve itself.

    This is the substance of the situation, as someone said, and from this knowledge, the Government asks you to vote this law, believing that your votes will be of the utmost use, because up till today all governments realize that if we don't turn communistic energies away from governing bodies, business will be at a standstill.

    We must prevent this! We must refer these injustices to the courts. That is the course we are pursuing. You tell me our future is not in peril. I believe that--but it isn't possible for a self-respecting duty--conscious Government to stand aside every time a strike occurs and watch the communistic factors intervene and push the workers into differences which will result in riot and bloodshed.

    2

    It is my belief that the Communistic Party is an enemy to the working class. Whenever a strike occurs, the Communists are always there doing their best to ensnare workers and employers, seeing how many victims they can add to their lists. We all know that and that is what is behind every strike.

    We know very well that this party receives orders from outside and has no other purpose than to cause a split between employer and employee and their joy is unbounded if a strike fails and the workers return to their jobs, discouraged and with bitterness in their hearts. These are the reasons we want your vote on the Communistic Bill.

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but ...

    Greek
    I E, I D 2 a 4
  • Saloniki-Greek Press -- July 10, 1929
    The Law on Communism--By K. Benizelos

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but to organize the means needed for enforcing and strengthening any overthrow they are planning; it has the status quo of an infant when left alone to feed and preserve itself.

    This is the substance of the situation, as someone said, and from this knowledge, the Government asks you to vote this law, believing that your votes will be of the utmost use, because up till today all governments realize that if we don't turn communistic energies away from governing bodies, business will be at a standstill.

    We must prevent this! We must refer these injustices to the courts. That is the course we are pursuing. You tell me our future is not in peril. I believe that--but it isn't possible for a self-respecting duty--conscious Government to stand aside every time a strike occurs and watch the communistic factors intervene and push the workers into differences which will result in riot and bloodshed.

    2

    It is my belief that the Communistic Party is an enemy to the working class. Whenever a strike occurs, the Communists are always there doing their best to ensnare workers and employers, seeing how many victims they can add to their lists. We all know that and that is what is behind every strike.

    We know very well that this party receives orders from outside and has no other purpose than to cause a split between employer and employee and their joy is unbounded if a strike fails and the workers return to their jobs, discouraged and with bitterness in their hearts. These are the reasons we want your vote on the Communistic Bill.

    Since the communistic party follows the leads of the 3rd International, accepting inspiration and checks outside of the dominion, from Moscow and come not to reveal theoretical communistic ideas, but ...

    Greek
    I E, I D 2 a 4