The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Greek Star -- March 04, 1904
    Collections for Museum

    p. 3- Upon the initiative of the newly-elected president of the Chicago Greek Community, Dr. Gregory Papaeliou, a committee has been formed, composed of Messrs. Geo. Kotsopoulos, Athanasius Nassakos, and Vasileios Dukas, to raise funds by collections to build an archaeological museum in the Old Episcopate of Tegea, which will be the only museum in the State of Arcadia. Many of the historic treasures of Arcadia are now on display in the Museum of Athens, and after the completion of this projected institution these will all be brought back to their native land.

    All Arcadians all over the United States are urgently requested to contribute generously for the projected museum, which will add honor and credit to their historic Arcadia.

    Dr. Papaeliou, who heads the committee, is enthusiastically confident that before long the needed money will be contributed, for Arcadians never shirk their duty.

    2

    It is characteristic of the Greek race not to forget Mother-Greece. Time or space never diminishes the love of the Greek for the mother of civilization. He may be a hundred-per-cent citizen of any country, but his love for Greece never dies.

    The Greeks of Chicago are proud of the many and varied contributions which they have made for improvements in their respective native towns.

    p. 3- Upon the initiative of the newly-elected president of the Chicago Greek Community, Dr. Gregory Papaeliou, a committee has been formed, composed of Messrs. Geo. Kotsopoulos, Athanasius Nassakos, and ...

    Greek
    III H, V A 1, IV
  • Greek Star -- March 11, 1904
    Sparta Thanks Her Native Sons in Chicago

    p. 2- Sparta, whose fame extends over the civilized world, sends a message of thanks to her sons in Chicago for the huge church clock which they have presented to her.

    Mr. Nicholas Karelas, who received the letter of appreciation from the church and the civil authorities, reports that $2,714.90 was spent in the purchase of the clock and for installing it and $395.50 for transportation, and that the balance of $355, the surplus of the Spartan contribution, will be donated to the Spartan Athletic Club of Sparta.

    Congratulations to the Spartans of Chicago.

    p. 2- Sparta, whose fame extends over the civilized world, sends a message of thanks to her sons in Chicago for the huge church clock which they have presented to ...

    Greek
    III H, V A 1
  • Greek Star -- March 18, 1904
    Chicago Greeks in Night Schools

    p. 2- The twenty-four night schools of Chicago, which closed for the season last Friday, report the number of students attending classes and their various nationalities. In the school at Monroe and Morgan Streets, 325 of 723 students were Greeks. In the Jones School at Harrison Street and Plymouth Court, 192 of 500 students were Greeks.

    The new term begins on October 3, and it is believed that the number of Greeks attending classes will be much larger than in the past because many Greeks have an idea of going into business for themselves.

    p. 2- The twenty-four night schools of Chicago, which closed for the season last Friday, report the number of students attending classes and their various nationalities. In the school at ...

    Greek
    I A 1 a, I A 3
  • Greek Star -- March 25, 1904
    Professor John Leotsacos in Chicago

    p. 2- The Greek community in Chicago will be host to Prof. J. Leotsacos, who is in Chicago by invitation of American institutions to deliver a series of lectures.

    The erudite Greek scholar, who is noted for his knowledge of Greek literature as well as of Latin and of German, and who has taught for many years in various colleges and universities in the United States, is scheduled to deliver historical and literary lectures in many parts of the country.

    p. 2- The Greek community in Chicago will be host to Prof. J. Leotsacos, who is in Chicago by invitation of American institutions to deliver a series of lectures. The ...

    Greek
    II B 2 g
  • Greek Star -- March 25, 1904
    A Private Carriage for the Greek Priest

    p. 2- Since the arrival of the Reverend Kyrillos Georgeadis, the Greek church here has begun to show a spirit of activity. Every Sunday the church is packed, and the collection basket (a plate is too small) is filled. Peace, harmony, and friendship reign everywhere. The venerable Greek priest is a real model of religious devotion and reverence, and his presence, in and out of town, is indispensable. His religious services are required not only in Chicago but in other places also, where there is no Greek priest. Inclement weather does not keep Father Georgeadis from responding to the call of ecclesiastical duty.

    Because of delays and impediments in transportation the community has resolved to purchase a private carriage for the Greek father so that his services to people may be facilitated. Two weeks ago because of bad weather he was compelled to waste a whole day in the suburbs awaiting proper facilities for travel.

    2

    The resolution of the community to buy a carriage for the Reverend Father Georgeadis is enthusiastically approved of by all, since it will be appropriate and dignified for our priest to travel in a manner befitting his station in life.

    p. 2- Since the arrival of the Reverend Kyrillos Georgeadis, the Greek church here has begun to show a spirit of activity. Every Sunday the church is packed, and the ...

    Greek
    III C, IV
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    The New Greek Dental Clinic

    p. 3- The well-known dentist, Dr. A. I. Sanitsas, with offices at 11 Blue Island Avenue, has opened an up-to-date dental clinic in the downtown district. His numerous patients are informed that Dr. Sanitsas' office hours are 9 A. M. to 3:30 P. M.

    Dr. Sanitsas' office is located at 109 Randolph Street, Schiller Building, Rooms 607-609.

    p. 3- The well-known dentist, Dr. A. I. Sanitsas, with offices at 11 Blue Island Avenue, has opened an up-to-date dental clinic in the downtown district. His numerous patients are ...

    Greek
    II A 1, IV
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    Believe it or Not.

    John Michalopoulos, a harness-maker at 68 Blue Island Avenue, who recently came to Chicago and opened a shop to ply his trade, has a big sign before his establishment which reads as follows:

    "We will make you the best harness. We take your measurement and guarantee the fit. Our harnesses are soft and pliable and do not irritate the neck. Give us a trial, and you will be convinced of their superior quality. Get yours to-day."

    John Michalopoulos, a harness-maker at 68 Blue Island Avenue, who recently came to Chicago and opened a shop to ply his trade, has a big sign before his establishment which ...

    Greek
    II A 2, V B
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    Nicholas Mourjukos Commits Suicide.

    Taking every precaution to succeed in his efforts to end his life, Nicholas Mourjakos, from Geraki, Lacedemon, Greece, committed suicide last night in his room by turning on the gas.

    Apparently, after he had finished a four-page letter which the authorities found upon a table, he opened the gas jets and lay down on his bed to die. That the deceased was not insane or temporarily unbalanced is revealed by his associates and by the tear-stained letter. He curses certain people whom he accuses of being the cause of his brother's death and the misery brought upon him. Parts of his letter follow, which the police handed to us for translation:

    "I have put an end to my life, alone, because I cannot bear to live any longer, although I have a large family of little children. Everyone comes to America to earn money. I came to lose money and life. God will punish those who are the cause of my beloved brother's death and of my own catastrophe.

    Good-bye, vain world!

    Nicholas Mourjukos.

    2

    Editor's Note:

    Some of the best minds the world over attribute suicide to mental derangement or to cowardice. Fear of the future also and many other causes are assigned to suicide. The deceased's letter reveals very clearly that he did not care to live any longer. His free, sane, and determined will put an end to his natural life. However, further enlightenment gained by scientific study will, in the future, will tell us more about suicide than we think we know to-day.

    Do we not say, "Death is the liberation of the soul from the shackles of material tyranny?"

    Whether death come one way or another, does it not liberate the soul? Because of our present narrow conception of life many things are assigned to the wrong category.

    Taking every precaution to succeed in his efforts to end his life, Nicholas Mourjakos, from Geraki, Lacedemon, Greece, committed suicide last night in his room by turning on the gas. ...

    Greek
    II E 2
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    Chicago Grocers against Greek Peddlers Judge Hurley Heaps Insults on Greeks - Greek Consul-General Inquires - Judge Retracts His Statements

    p. 2- A committee of Chicago grocers last week declared war to the finish on Greek vegetable and fruit peddlers, accusing them of being the parasites of the trade and requesting the city council to prohibit peddlers from selling merchandise in streets and alleys or to impose a heavy license-fee on them so that they may quit acting as leeches.

    So great was the effect of the grocers' war on the Greeks that Judge Hurley from the bench cast wantonly violent insults right and left at Greeks in general as he delivered his judicial decision to the six Greek defendants (newly-arrived immigrants) who were before him for disobeying a police ordinance.

    2

    The Greek Consul-General, Dr. N. Salopoulos, who is distinguished for his academic learning, dignity, and sanity, has written a letter to the American Jurist calling its attention to certain facts and pointing out that the accusations against the Greeks were wholly unjust. The Consul's letter, which was published by the press of the city, brought results, and His Honor publicly retracted his statements.

    That closes the incident of the insult to Greeks, which was absolutely unwarranted; but the grocers want the Greek leeches off the streets. The war is on against the poor unorganized Greek peddlers. The grocers are organized, and consequently their voice is the louder.

    Of course the Greeks, who are determined to make an honest living, are not so easy to deal with. Their argument is that they, the Greeks, facilitate buying for housewives, and these in turn are in favor of the Greek peddlers and their strictly fresh and seasonable merchandise, which is also according to the housewives, much cheaper.

    3

    If logic means anything, I am inclined to believe that the housewives will win. The Greeks are cultivating the good will of these, their daily customers.

    On the other hand the poor grocers are to be pitied because they are losing business, and something ought to be done before these Greeks ruin them. The way is open for the grocers; let them compete with the Greeks, and the better man shall win. That is the clean, pure spirit of business, honest competition.

    p. 2- A committee of Chicago grocers last week declared war to the finish on Greek vegetable and fruit peddlers, accusing them of being the parasites of the trade and ...

    Greek
    II A 2, I C
  • Greek Star -- April 01, 1904
    The Greek Confectioners Chicago the Mecca of the Candy Business

    p. 2- Practically every busy corner in Chicago is occupied by a Greek candy store. Their perfect cleanliness and their elaborate method of making pure and delicious candies have made the Greeks the predominant factor in that line of business.

    An impartial investigation reveals the indisputable fact that the Greeks are the fathers of the present candy industry.

    What kind of candy store did we have here before the Greeks began to monopolize the trade? Where was candy sold, and what kind of candy? Old-timers know and remember where it was sold, and what kind of candy it was before the Greeks developed and expanded the manufacture and sale of confectionery.

    2

    The Greek confectioners are Chicago's pride, and Chicago is the pride of two thirds of the country. Chicago, not New York, has the credit of being the city of candy-makers. Seventy per cent of the Greek candy-merchants in America were originally citizens of Chicago. After they had learned the trade of fellow-Greeks for whom they worked and by saving had accumulated enough capital, they bade Chicago farewell and scattered to the four corners of this great country.

    Each and every one of them, with Chicago money and Chicago training in the art of candy-making, found the city which suited him, and a new and up-to-date store in the Chicago style sprang up at the busy corner of that city. Now the rest of the story is easy. More Greeks came along and learned the trade, and the whole country is sweetened by the exquisite art of the Greek confectioner.

    Inevitably Chicago became the center of supply for all these new stores all over the western and southern states. New industries sprang up here to supply the candy-makers' demands as they accelerated the development 3of the confectioner's business. Chicago firms have hundreds of traveling salesmen to supply these Greek confectioneries with the needs of the trade. This kind of business and such an activity did not exist before the Greeks tempted and sweetened the tooth of the country.

    One of the wholesale dealers in Chicago, Mr. Christ Vlachandreas, of North Dearborn Street, who deals in extracts, travels far and wide, and because of his Greek shrewdness and by impersonating a Frenchman in talk, action, etc., he has discovered the real feelings of people in general toward the Greeks. In every state where he travels he cunningly directs his conversation toward the Greek confectioners and the Greeks in general. His ears are tickled with eulogies of the Greeks; he learns that they are clean, industrious, peaceable, law-abiding, honest people. The above qualities are all correctly and rightfully attributed to the Greeks. A big merchant in a western state told Mr. Vlachandreas that the Greeks in his town are the best specimens of human beings with some exceptions; that is, "they love wine, women, and cards." Of course we as Greeks know the wise saying of our ancestors, "nothing to excess," and accordingly we should govern and moderate our desires and our predilections.

    4

    And in order to maintain this good name which we enjoy everywhere, we must keep on endeavoring to surpass our record, rising from better to best and up to higher levels.

    Well, are we going to shine only in one trade or line of business? Could Greeks tackle anything else and leave it undeveloped? Of course not! Let us make another record in some other line of business as yet undeveloped. The restaurant business in Chicago and elsewhere is growing very rapidly, and it will not be long before the Greeks will claim a monopoly on the heretofore undeveloped business of catering.

    p. 2- Practically every busy corner in Chicago is occupied by a Greek candy store. Their perfect cleanliness and their elaborate method of making pure and delicious candies have made ...

    Greek
    II A 2, IV