The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 25, 1876
    Merry Christmas.

    Those who prefer to celebrate Christmas outside of the family circle will have a choice of many places to go.

    Wurster's theatrical troupe will present the play "Heinrich Heine" in Standard Hall.

    The comedy "Berliner in Philadelphia" will be given in the Vorwarts Turner Hall. The play was much applauded at its first presentation.

    Friends of the popular drama will have an opportunity to see Dr. Johann's "Faust's Life, Deeds and Descent to Hell" in the Concordia People's Theater.

    2

    The pantomine "Jack and the Beanstalk" will be given in the Adelphi Theater.

    Musical numbers and little dramatic plays will be given in the Coliseum as well as in the Toledo. The German Amusement Club is organizing a theatrical presentation in Thielemann's Theater in which "The Clever Widow" will be given. A dance will close the evening. A big evening entertainment and dance will take place in Eigenmann's Hall, 792 Archer Ave.

    The Concordia lodge, No. 15 will give its 11th dance in the North Side Turner Hall; Harmony lodge No. 221 will give a Christmas dance in Globe Hall; the Uhland lodge its first dance in Burlington Hall. The Singers' Club, Orpheus, will give a dance in its own hall.

    Those who prefer to celebrate Christmas outside of the family circle will have a choice of many places to go. Wurster's theatrical troupe will present the play "Heinrich Heine" in ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 12, 1879
    Christmas Presents

    The Johanna lodge distributed Christmas presents yesterday in the basement of the Sinai Synagogue, 21st Street and Indiana Avenue. Presents were given to sixty-six boys and thirty-five girls. The gifts consisted of nice warm wearing apparel. Every boy received a pair of pants, coat and vest, two suits of underwear, two pair of stockings, boots or shoes, hat, necktie, suspenders, shawl, and gloves. Each girl was presented with a raincoat, hat, underwear, shoes, gloves, and so forth.

    The benevolently inclined ladies of the lodge obtained the money by arranging a concert and apparently donated additional funds of their own--judging from the quality of the presents.

    Only a comparatively small number of children were present. As most of their parents had seen better days, and as the Johanna lodge did not want 2the little ones to know that they were objects of charity, the presents were sent to the various homes.

    The children who came to the hall were given candy, nuts, cookies, and so forth.

    The ladies in charge of gift distribution prefer to remain anonymous.

    The old proverb applies here, "Blessed be the Giver".

    The Johanna lodge distributed Christmas presents yesterday in the basement of the Sinai Synagogue, 21st Street and Indiana Avenue. Presents were given to sixty-six boys and thirty-five girls. The gifts ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 13, 1879
    Appeal to Our German Women

    The glorious Christmas festival for our children draws ever nearer. What longing is awakened in young minds when we mention Christmas!

    Our memories of a happy childhood are the outstanding features of our declining years, and Christmas, above all, is indelibly impressed on our minds. How many poor children come to realize their abject poverty, when the world in general is merry and joyful, while the destitute are forgotten! In order to reach those children over whom dire want holds sway, and among whom the joys of Christmas are unknown, the Ladies' Aid of the German Society has decided to provide a number of children with warm clothing again this year and, incidentally, to arrange a festival for them.

    The concert, which had been arranged to provide funds for the purpose, unfortunately did not produce enough money to pay for the clothing which we intended to distribute, and therefore the ladies of the German Society found it 2necessary to appeal to benevolently inclined Germans to help complete the work.

    Donations--small or large--are always appreciated. The Ladies' Aid Society decided not to make a general collection, but to appeal to those benevolently inclined people who would gladly provide the needed funds, so that poor children also may have a Merry Christmas.

    The following committee members will gladly receive your contributions: North Side: Mrs. Claussenius, 149 Cass Street; Mrs. Molter, 484 Dearborn Avenue; Mrs. Ebener, 401 Larrabee Street.

    West Side: Mrs. Bluthardt, 43 South Peoria Street; Mrs. Rapp, 217 West Madison Street; Mrs. Buehler, North Avenue and Robey Street.

    South Side: Mrs. Clara Berger, 431 Prairie Avenue; Mrs. Blumenschein, 328 Cottage Grove Avenue; Mrs. Marie Werkmeister, 129 Archer Avenue.

    The glorious Christmas festival for our children draws ever nearer. What longing is awakened in young minds when we mention Christmas! Our memories of a happy childhood are the outstanding ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 19, 1879
    Christmas Presents for German Orphans

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who have no loving parents to arrange a pleasant festival.

    Uhlich's Orphanage takes care of sixty-four children at present--youngsters who have the same longings at Christmas time as the offsprings of a wealthier class, or the more fortunately situated children who bask in the love of their parents.

    We appeal to the hundreds of well-to-do German families in our city to think of these poor orphans. Give just a little, your own children will never miss it, and you will earn sincere gratitude. Give what you can spare, clothing, toys, cake, candy or food--everything is welcome.

    2

    Presents will be accepted at the following convenient locations:

    At the Orphanage, corner Burlington Street and Center Avenue; in the basement of St. Paul's Church, southwest corner of LaSalle and Ohio Streets; at Charles Emmerich and Company, 285-287 Madison Street, and at S. Bauer and Company, 191 Lake Street.

    Christmas gifts will be distributed at Uhlich's Orphanage on Christmas Day. This simple statement may suffice to induce our good-natured Germans to act in behalf of the poor children who ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b, II D 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 27, 1879
    Christmas Presents at Uhlich's Orphanage

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let it be said, that the appeal of the asylum's executive board brought generous response from the Germans. Donors were very liberal, and so many presents were received that many were saved for another occasion.

    Members of the board, and several ladies, decorated the Christmas tree, which was mounted in the sewing room. The tree was provided by Miss Bauer, the Kindergarten teacher.

    The festivities started at 4 P. M. and several hundred people were present. The orphans, twenty-one girls and forty boys, marched from the schoolroom into the festival room, surrounded the tree and sang, "Vom Himmel Hoch Da Komm Ich Her". Pastor Hartmann preached an inspiring sermon and ended with a prayer.

    2

    Then the children sang "Ein Koenig Kommt Aus Zion," at the conclusion of which Reverend Gottlieb Blankenhahn, in charge of the Orphanage, had the children recite the prophesies of the Bible up to the time of Christ's birth.

    The tree was lit while the children sang "Welche Morgenroethe Wallet Himmelab," and, after a few more words were said about the age-old festival, the children formed into ranks again and marched and sang.

    Then the presents were distributed. At first a bag of candy and nuts, finally a toy commensurate with the child's age. The children played until 9 P. M. and then went to bed. We may well assume that all had pleasant dreams, as all departed in a very happy mood.

    Finally Reverend Mr. Hartmann addressed the visitors. The festival was undoubtedly one of the most outstanding affairs of its kind we have witnessed this year.

    Christmas presents were distributed yesterday afternoon at Uhlich's Orphanage, located at the corner of Burlington and Center Streets. Many members of Chicago's Lutheran parishes were present. In connection therewith let ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II D 4, III C, I B 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- December 31, 1879
    Christmas Distribution of Presents by the Ladies' Aid

    The Ladies' Aid, a branch of the German Society, arranged a festival yesterday afternoon at Brand's Hall, located at the corner of Clark and Erie Streets, for the benefit of poor children. Many of our German women participated and a large number of presents were received. The interest manifested by the visitors, and the liberal attitude of our businessmen, deserve commendation. The association received more gifts than could be distributed yesterday. The success is attributable in a large measure to the endeavors of the committee headed by Mrs. Marie Werkmeister. This applies to the presentation of the gifts as well as the afternoon's entertainment.

    Although only 103 children had been listed, the number increased to 140 by the time the distribution was in progress. Many women, particularly the mothers of the little tots, were present. A Christmas tree was 2mounted on the stage and was surrounded by cardboard figures representing Biblical subjects. These were the deft handiwork of the ladies forming the committee. The children tried on the clothes, given as a present, in an adjoining room before the commencement of the festivities.

    Oscar Schmoll played an introductory number on the piano, whereupon the children marched through the hall to the stage and there grouped themselves into a half circle. All of them carried little baskets containing their presents: a complete outfit of clothing for the boys as well as for the girls. Miss Blanca Pick recited a poem, a composition by Mrs. Werkmeister, and, while most of the children were too young to understand it, the work proved very impressive to the older contingent.

    Mrs. Clara Huck sang "Herz Aller Liebstes Schatzerl Du" and Oscar Schmoll played the piano accompaniment. Because of her splendid voice and good training, Mrs. Huck's rendition proved a musical treat indeed.

    3

    Miss Krause and Miss Trautwein then played several appealing piano selections.

    After a short intermission, Miss Wangemann sang. She was followed by Miss Pick, who recited the tragic poem "Mona's Waters". The next number on the program was "Waer Ich Ein Veilchen Auf Der Au," sung by Mrs. Huck, who followed with an encore, "I Und Mei Bua".

    Next, several piano pieces were played by Oscar Schmoll, and the children and young ladies danced to the music. Then followed the raffling of a bouquet of waxflowers, donated for the occasion by Miss Trautwein. Mrs. Peipers, treasurer, who was in charge of this part of the program, sold 107 chance tickets at twenty-five cents each; number fifty was the lucky winner.

    Finally Miss Wangemann sang another number, dancing continued, and the festival came to a close at half past seven in the evening.

    The members of the Ladies' Aid hereby express their gratitude to all who 4participated, particularly the numerous donors.

    The Ladies' Aid, a branch of the German Society, arranged a festival yesterday afternoon at Brand's Hall, located at the corner of Clark and Erie Streets, for the benefit of ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, III B 3 b, II D 10
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 07, 1880
    The Ladies' Aid of the German Society

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday:

    "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society hereby expresses its gratitude to all who gave gifts or otherwise helped to provide a Christmas festival for the poor children. The ladies particularly thank Mr. Brand for his courtesy in having provided free use of his hall, and are very grateful to the German press which gave publicity to the event in so liberal a manner, thus helping considerably in making the affair a success. Furthermore, we thank the various businessmen for the presents they contributed and their friendly interest; also the individuals whose donations enabled the Society to have a plentiful supply of everything for the occasion. The ladies also thank Mr. Bauer, who furnished a piano for the occasion, as well as Mrs. Huck, Mrs. Thorwarth, Miss Pick, and Mr. Schmoll, whose combined efforts made a success of the affair. In fact, we thank all who collaborated with us to make the affair a success.

    "An accounting will be submitted next Wednesday."

    The members of the executive committee of the Ladies' Aid Society, a branch of the German Society, passed the following resolution yesterday: "The Ladies' Aid Society of the German Society ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- December 20, 1880
    German Women's Club

    The German Women's Club will distribute Christmas presents among poor children on Tuesday, Dec. 28, at Klare's Hall on North Clark Street. The children will be treated to music, coffee, and cakes.

    Spectators will be served for 25 cents. Visitors are asked to bring along different kinds of foods to replenish the insufficient supplies of the Women's Club.

    We have repeatedly written against publicity-making charities--in which the principal object is ostentation--but, to our regret, without success. The treat and the gifts really do not come from the German Women's Club, 2which only takes the credit at the expense of others. Rather than digging into their own purses, these rich ladies prefer to ask the Press for support. Clothes dealers, toy and book shops are pressed till the necessary supply of second-hand merchandise is together. If this is still insufficient, a few musicians and artists are chosen, who will be flattered and persuaded to give their services free for the good work. A feeding en masse will put up a scene the effects of which very seldom fail to appear. The spectators will have to pay an entrance fee and the German Women's Club will get the laurels. With the satisfaction of having taken a share of the children's tears of gratitude, the lady of the Club goes to bed, pleased that her own purse is still intact and that she acted according to the word of God. The left hand does not know what the right one is doing.

    The German Women's Club will distribute Christmas presents among poor children on Tuesday, Dec. 28, at Klare's Hall on North Clark Street. The children will be treated to music, coffee, ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 3 b
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- November 14, 1888
    For Our Dear Little Ones!

    An entertainment has been arranged by the Workers Educational Society of the North Side, Sunday afternoon and evening, in Otto Bergner's place, 58 Clybourn Avenue. The proceeds are destined for Christmas gifts for the pupils of the Sunday school.

    The school is expected to progress again under the direction of its new teacher who will be installed next Sunday. In order to fight the parsons it is necessary for a while to imitate their tactics. Afterwards,when humanity has reached the age of reason, the so-called Christmas celebration can be discarded as well as other inanities.

    No worker's family of the North Side should be absent on the coming Sunday. Admission is free. A program and dance orchestra will be provided, beginning at 4 o'clock.

    An entertainment has been arranged by the Workers Educational Society of the North Side, Sunday afternoon and evening, in Otto Bergner's place, 58 Clybourn Avenue. The proceeds are destined for ...

    German
    III B 3 b, II B 2 f, II B 1 a, I B 4, I E
  • Chicagoer Arbeiter Zeitung -- April 25, 1889
    Dewitt C. Cregier's Centennial Proclamation Hypocrisy in the Mayor's Chair

    Our burgomaster released his centennial Proclamation yesterday. The citizenship of Chicago is requested therein, to celebrate the 30th of April by keeping all business closed and assembling in the churches and synagogues in order to thank the creator for all the good, etc.

    One out of two things: either our Mayor is lagging behind the times or he is a hypocrite who finds it more convenient to bend his knee before the religious swindle than to pass it by or oppose it.

    Either Mr. Cregier still believes in a personalized Creator, the famous old man sitting in the clouds and watching his children on this orb jumping and dancing around, or he is a cowardly hypocrite who considers it a clever political move to make concessions to preachers' stuff and mass idiocy.

    2

    In the latter case, we do not envy the Mayor his loyalty to his own conviction nor his personal courage.

    Anyone without backbone to express his convictions in major questions, regardless of the position he may hold, is no man but only a pitiable person hanging his coat where the wind blows.

    We are blushing with shame to find the religious swindle cared for, well tended, and formally raised by high authorities in this freest country of the world, in these United States founded on an irreligious basis, and only 100 years after the appearance of Thomas Paine, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin.

    It is a shame! Are all achievements in scientific research of the last 300 years passed by the heads of modern Americans without leaving the slightest trace? When reading Dewitt C. Cregier's proclamation, we cannot help but reach this conclusion:

    3

    Mr. Cregier speaks in his proclamation of this "preferred" nation. Maybe Mr. Cregier discovered that the smart yankees somehow and somewhere got the best of the peddling Jews by cheating them out of their divine attribute of being the chosen people!

    A nation which is able to manufacture hams and other things out of wood, will certainly succeed to cheat clever Hebrews, and we will not waste any more time with Mr. Cregier's "preferred" nation. This nation certainly has advantages; you only have to know what kind.

    We want to recall Goethe's words to you and your brethren who have remained too far back in time or are professional hypocrites; "He who possesses science and art, also has religion. He who does not possess both, should have religion."

    We further recommend to you the study of Max Nordau's conventional lies of civilized human societies, which should be known to you, Mr. Cregier, from commentaries in the Chicago press.

    Our burgomaster released his centennial Proclamation yesterday. The citizenship of Chicago is requested therein, to celebrate the 30th of April by keeping all business closed and assembling in the churches ...

    German
    III C, III B 3 b, I F 5, I C