The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- July 30, 1863
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein and a German Volunteer Defense Corps President Speaks for Society

    The New York riots have shown that this Republic is headed for an abyss if its citizens, the people, are not able to check perversive activity and thus avert the ruin of our nation. We do not agree with those who are inclined to shut their eyes to the injustice of the Conscription Act. Say what you will, the fact remains that the three-hundred dollar clause is not in keeping with the ideals of equality, one of the fundamental principles upon which this Democracy is founded. Senator Wilson, the author and sponsor of the Conscription Act may boast that it is an exact replica of the French law, yet we must sustain the objection that we are living in a Republic, in which all citizens are equal before the law, in which no one has preference on account of social standing, financial status, color, race, or creed, in which each and every citizen has the same privileges and the same duties toward the country and its Government. In France, however, the people are under the rule of despotism--a reign that 2ignores and tramples upon the rights of the governed and serves the interests of stockbrokers, Jesuits, and inhuman ruffians who traffic in souls.

    Yet, although we are opposed to the manner which the law prescribes for conscription, we firmly believe that conscription itself is necessary. Or is the Rebellion to gain in extent and strength because the Free States lack sufficient men? Shall our victorious Army stop fighting? Or is it to be halted on its successful course? Or shall we give the French Emperor, who is controlled by the Jesuits, time to carry out his pernicious plans against our Republic? No, a thousand times! No!! So, whoever wishes to attack conscription itself, will have to be looked upon as a friend of the Rebels.

    However, the citizens of New York who incited men to riot must also be classed as friends of the Rebels.

    The atrocities committed against defensless people, the murders, robberies, the looting, and the arson must convince every loyal citizen of the Republic, every 3true Democrat, as well as every true Republican, that the Conscription Law, despite its evident and deplorable deficiencies, is the lesser evil. And why? Because mob activity is always followed by martial law. Although all the members of the Polish Diet were noblemen, it was never anything but a legalized mob; for it was not the law that ruled in and controlled that Assembly, but rather military force, and Poland has to thank the arbitrary rule of its aristocrats for the sufferings it has endured.

    The June Battle in Paris in 1848 was mob activity on a large scale and resulted in rule by the military authorities. The fights in which Lichnowsky and Auerswald lost their lives (1848, at Frankfurt on the Main) were nothing but riots, and it was through these riots that the reaction in Germany gained power. Not only the Philistines (a revolutionary faction that took part in the German uprising of 1848) but also many others sided with the Government. They decided it was better to be ruled by soldiers than by the kind of Democrats who resort to murder, robbery, and arson, and thus the hope that they would be governed by a German Parliament was destroyed, and all other "golden dreams" vanished 4in thin air.

    The New York riots will serve the Republic no better. All the people who participated in them were not worthy to be citizens of a republic. If this statement needed further proof, it is furnished by the fact that the persuasive eloquence of an Archbishop was required to quiet the rioters, and that they bowed to this Prelate. This immaturity of the people is their strongest invitation to tyranny, and if all citizens of America were as incapable of governing themselves as those New York rioters, the fate of the Republic would be sealed!

    Who, for instance, will guarantee that the same mob will not act on request of those who do the thinking for the "minors," (at the request of political or religious leaders, or rather seducers) and create a riot in favor of a monarchy? People who are not able to form their own convictions, who cannot think, who have no will of their own, are as unstable as the waters of the ocean, as a straw in a storm, and constitute the greatest danger that can beset a 5republic. The mob rule in the South was responsible for the Rebellion of the slaveholders. Only through rioting did the leaders of the Rebellion succeed in overpowering the Union element.

    However, in the North, in the Free States, there is another element, and that is very fortunate. We refer to those Germans who immigrated to this Republic because they love liberty more than the land of their birth, yea, even more than life itself. At their side you will find those Americans and Irish who have attained political independence, because they are able to form their own convictions and do their own thinking--people who want neither mob rule nor sword rule.

    The question is, what they must do. The answer is simple: They must permit no rioting, so that military rule is unnecessary.

    The citizens themselves must preserve order. Germans, Americans, and Irish must stand together and everyone who attemps to sow the seed of discord, 6mistrust, or dissatisfaction among our citizens, everyone who awakens internal strife by creating prejudice, whether it be against Americans, or Irish, or Germans, whether it be of a political or religious nature, must be looked upon as an enemy of the Republic.

    Everywhere we must establish citizens' defense organizations, so that our military authorities will have no reason to interfere with, or take charge of, the administration of our political affairs; for it is far easier to bring about sword rule than to remove it.

    But how about the three-hundred dollar clause? Well, if the Republic perishes, will only the rich be affected, and not the poor? We think the poor will suffer more than the rich. Rich people can live anywhere, but poor people need the Republic too much to permit it to be destroyed or its privileges curtailed. And many of the wealthy will not purchase substitution, but will fight themselves. The Rebellion must be suppressed, and suppressed now, and at any cost. If our people hesitate, old Sybil will cast another book of 7the history of the world into the fire, and only because our people and Government were ignorant; and we will be troubled and harrassed not only by the Rebellion, but also by the intervention of the "Jesuit Emperor" of France. That must not happen. So let us prevent any mob violence; for who can guarantee that agents of the "French Scoundrel" will not take advantage of the confusion of our Government to create these riots? And friends of the Rebellion who incite to rioting in the North are no better. So down with them! Or shall we wait until a riot is in full sway and intervention by the military authorities is necessary? Then it will be too late. Martial law will put an end to the people's liberty. Freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of lawful assembly--all these cease to be when the sword takes up its rule.

    Therefore the Chicago Arbeiterverein resolved to take up arms against any and everyone who makes any attempt to incite a riot. Someone, some organization, had to take the initiative. However, any friend of the Republic is invited to join our organization for the preservation of law and order. They need not be of German descent; they need only be loyal patriots--Americans in the 8true sense of the word.

    Theodore Hilscher, President.

    The New York riots have shown that this Republic is headed for an abyss if its citizens, the people, are not able to check perversive activity and thus avert the ...

    German
    III B 2, III D, I E, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 12, 1863
    For the Victims of the Fire

    Acting according to the old adage, "A dollar today is worth ten tomorrow", the undersigned formed a committee last Sunday to collect voluntary gifts to care for the immediate needs of those families that suffered losses in Saturday's fire. To date, we have collected $312.63, which we distributed among twenty-seven families--not a large sum when one considers that there are seventy-one children in these families. However, the amount was large enough to provide what they needed most.

    Having done what we proposed to do, we gratefully acknowledge the willingness with which the donors came to the aid of the unfortunates in this emergency.

    Following is a list of the names of the collectors and the sums which they received: Mr. Boehner, $26.70; Mr. Bouse, $7.75; Mr. Freiburger, $49.38; Mr. Hilpert, $6.50; Mr. Frank, $23.00; Mr. Mueller, $83.85; Mr. Werkmeister, 2$37.90; Mr. Leindecker, $6.25; Mr. Kappler, $3.50; Mr. Pollak, $10.00; Mr. Schwienk, $23.80; Mr. Ritzinger, $34.00.

    Families aided: German, 12; Irish, 7; American, 2; Bohemian, 2; Dutch, 1; Negro, 3.

    Chicago, September 10, 1863.

    The Committee:

    F. G. Mueller,

    L. H. Freiburger,

    R. M. Bouse,

    Xavier Ritzinger,

    Johann Roemer,

    Fred Frank,

    Members of the Chicago

    Arbeiterverein.

    Acting according to the old adage, "A dollar today is worth ten tomorrow", the undersigned formed a committee last Sunday to collect voluntary gifts to care for the immediate needs ...

    German
    II D 10, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 22, 1863
    Lay Corner Stone of New Turnhalle

    At ten o'clock yesterday morning, the members of the Chicago Turngemeinde marched in solemn procession from their old hall on Kinzie Street to the site of their new building. The Great Western Band led the procession and was followed by the pupils.of the Turnhalle and the turners, both groups attired in their uniforms. A large crowd accompanied the procession and gathered about the turners when the site was reached. A tin box containing a copy of the German newspapers published in Chicago as well as a copy of the Chicago Tribune and the Evening Journal, several issues of the Turnzeitung, a copy of the minutes of the last meeting of the turners, the last monthly report of the Turngemeinde, a membership list of the Turngemeinde and its pupils, a list of members of the Turner Company of the old Hecker Regiment, a list of turners who died in the service of the United States in the present war, a copy of the Baltimore Wecker in which Washington's Farewell Address appeared, and various coins, were all placed in the cornerstone.

    2

    After the Great Western Band had played a patriotic selection, Mr. Wilhelm Rapp made a brief address to the turners, reminding them of the duties they assumed when they decided to erect a new Turnhalle, and also of their obligations to the other German residents of Chicago, who had wholeheartedly and generously supported the enterprise. He pointed out that it is their duty not only to engage in physical exercise and thus keep in good physical condition, but also to develop their minds, to grow in knowledge, thus making the new Turnhalle a nursery of physical strength as well as a temple of noble intellectual attainments, of ardent love toward our country and its freedom and toward their German fellow citizens of Chicago, in whose interest a heroic company of local turners had fought for two years.

    Thereupon the ceremony of laying the cornerstone was performed by Mr. Baetz assisted by Mr. Hein. A patriotic march rendered by the Great Western Band concluded the program.

    3

    Thus the cornerstone of the principal pillar of the new Turnhalle has been laid, and the outer walls are rising at a rapid pace. Let us hope that the work will be finished in due time without injury to any of the workers employed in the construction of the building. We are certain that the Germans of Chicago will continue to support this noble undertaking, for the Chicago Turngemeinde has always shown, by word and deed, that it is a patriotic, civic-minded, and charitable organization.

    At ten o'clock yesterday morning, the members of the Chicago Turngemeinde marched in solemn procession from their old hall on Kinzie Street to the site of their new building. The ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 01, 1864
    Dedication of the Turnhalle

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall depict the building. The facade is built in the neo-Italian style and presents a pretty picture in its festive decorations. At the peak of the facade, the American flag waves proudly, symbolizing the patriotism of those good sons of Germany who will make the Turnhalle the scene of much future social and intellectual activity.

    We shall try to acquaint our readers with this building, which is so arranged that it will adequately meet all the demands for which it has been erected.

    The building site, which has been leased for a period of ten years, is 101 by 160 feet, and is conveniently located, being readily accessible by streetcar from the north and the south. In accordance with the plan of the architect, 2Mr. H. Rehwoldt, the building covers only a part of the plot, eaving sufficient room for open-air gymnastics. Mr. Paesch supervised the masonry work, and Mr. Schmidt and Mr. Katz were the carpenter contractors.

    The Halle is a two-story building of solid frame construction. The foundation is of stone. The structure is about 50 feet high, 73 feet wide, and 142 feet long. The first floor contains a spacious vestibule, from which a ten-foot stairway leads to the second story: There is a billiard room, 30 by 24 feet, on the first floor; also a club-room, 30 by 24 feet, with door to the street; and a long bar for the refreshment of thirsty souls. The basement contains the gymnasium, which is 70 by 65 by 24 feet, with an area of nearly 5,000 square feet. Here we find various types of apparatus for exercise. On the left side of the building, there is a reading room, a dining room, and a bedroom for the caretaker.

    The dance hall occupies most of the second story. The devotees of Terpsichore 3will have an area of 7,700 square feet to practice their art. Thus the dance hall is one of the largest in Chicago, equalling the space in Bryan's Hall and having many advantages which other halls do not offer. To prevent any danger in an emergency, the dance hall is provided with fine wide doors, and the large stairway is accessible from two directions. Two stairways lead to the lower floor and basement where they are connected with outside doors, and there is a special stairway from the stage to the gymnasium. A special room, 20 by 22 feet, containing a wardrobe, wash stand, and toilet, has been provided for the comfort and convenience of the ladies. A room with like conveniences has been furnished for the men.

    Two stairways lead from the vestibule of the second floor to the galleries, which are located on each side of the dance hall. Two rooms have been arranged on the second floor for the general comfort of the dancers. These rooms are furnished with card tables, and, no doubt, will be the scene of many card parties.

    4

    Two large heating plants have been built in the basement and will supply the whole building with the necessary warmth. A kitchen has been arranged immediately under the dining room, and a dumb waiter has been installed for the convenience of cooks and waiters. The basement also contains a large beer cellar and toilets. Mr. Becker did all the tinwork, Mr. Lampatner furnished the gas appliances, Williams & Wiseman did the glazing and decorating, and Mr. Lester installed the heating equipment; and, in the opinion of experts, these men did their work very well.

    Mr. John W. Doehler furnished the decorations for the dedication. The stage was graced by a bust of Father Jahn, the founder of German gymnastics. His likeness reminds one of the days when the turner movement was in its infancy, and the memory furnishes a delightful contract between those dreary days and the present. The members of the Turngemeinde formed a semicircle on the stage, above which places were reserved for officials, speakers, the building committee, and reporters.

    5

    At 3:30 P. M., Mr. August Becker gave the keys of the Turnhalle to the representative of the building committee, Mr. Huhn, who in turn handed them to the chairman of the executive board. Thereupon, Mr. B. Wiedinger, the president of the Turngemeinde, thanked all the men who had participated in the erection of the new building. Addresses were made by Mrs. Kenkel, Wilhelm Rapp, and Mr. Foellger.

    In the evening a concert was given. The program was very good, and delighted the assembly. Festivities will be concluded tomorrow evening with a grand ball.

    Yesterday's opening of the new Turnhalle was one of the most joyful events in the history of the Garden City. Before describing the dedicatory ceremonies to our readers, we shall ...

    German
    II B 3, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 06, 1864
    The Conscription Act Petition to Congress by the Chicago Arbeiterverein

    We are publishing the petition which the Chicago Arbeiterverein sent to Congress, and we urge all private citizens, as well as societies in other cities, to submit similar petitions to our national legislature. Since the drawing of numbers has been postponed until February 15, there is ample time to agitate for the devising of a just system of military administration. The petition of the Chicago Arbeiterverein reads as follows: "To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America:

    "Your petitioners, citizens of the City of Chicago, County of Cook, State of Illinois, most respectfully point out that, in their opinion, the congressional law commonly called the 'Conscription Act,' should not only be amended in regard to certain provisions, but should also be fundamentally 2changed: it should be based upon such principles as will render it sufficiently effective to procure the best soldiers without being unduly oppressive to the people.

    "We, therefore, recommend that you, as the representatives of the people, embody the following fundamental principles in the Conscription Act:

    "1) From this day until the Rebellion has been completely suppressed, the following are subject to military duty:

    "a) Every American citizen;

    "b) Every resident of the United States who has declared his intention of becoming an American citizen.

    "c) Every resident of the United States, who, though he has not declared his intention of becoming a citizen, has through continued tenure of real 3estate, or through the operation of a business or industry under the protection of the law, has indicated, or will so indicate, that he has selected this country as his permanent home. This provision shall apply to all residents (as described above) who are between the ages of twenty and forty-five.

    "2) The persons described in sub-paragraph c may evade military service by leaving the country for which they have no sympathy when the country is in great danger.

    "3) Men who are able to perform military service are to be divided into two classes. The first class shall consist of all men who were single at at the time the law was enacted and of all childless widowers between the ages of twenty and forty-five. The second class shall consist of all others who are subject to military duty; these are not to be called to 4service until all men of the first class have been enrolled.

    "4) The first class shall be enrolled for active service by the competent authorities.

    "5) No substitution or redemption or any other form of exemption shall be permitted.

    "6) Only those shall be exempt from active service who are physically or mentally unfit, or who must support orphaned or minor sisters or brothers, or aged or feeble parents.

    "7) Convicted criminals shall be considered unworthy to serve in the armed forces of the United States.

    5

    "We believe that the principles of justice, equality, and propriety recommend such a law; a law like that outlined above would place our strong young men at the disposal of the Government, and commerce and industry would not be seriously hampered by their absence; it would provide through taxation the material necessary to carry on the war, and would do away with conscription by lottery, thus placing rich and poor on the same level, simplifying conscription, and giving the greatest possible satisfaction. [Translator's note: The recommendations of the Arbeiterverein contain no apparent reference to taxation.]

    "If the members of your honorable body will take the trouble of perusing the pages of history, they will find that a law similar to the one which we recommend was passed by the National Convention of France at a time when internal rioting and foreign despotism threatened to extinguish the light of liberty in that country, and that this conscription law saved France.

    6

    "The Committee:

    "A. C. Hesing, Theodor Hilscher,

    Colonel Knobelsdorf, L. Brentano;

    Wilhelm Haase, president;

    J. Greenbaum, secretary."

    We are publishing the petition which the Chicago Arbeiterverein sent to Congress, and we urge all private citizens, as well as societies in other cities, to submit similar petitions to ...

    German
    III B 1, III B 2, I G, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 26, 1864
    One Hundred and One Members of the Arbeiterverein Protest against Sending Delegates to the Cleveland Convention

    The meeting of the Chicago Arbeiterverein held on the seventeenth of May, 1864 was attended by only a relatively small number of members. By a vote of thirty-seven to thirty-five (the organization has a membership of more than a thousand), it was decided to send delegates to the convention which is to meet at Cleveland, Ohio, on May 29, 30, and 31 for the purpose of nominating a liberal candidate for the Presidency of the United States. The following men were chosen to represent the Chicago Arbeiterverein: Doctor C. Schmidt, Mr. Theodore Hilscher, and Mr. W. H. Haase.

    However, since this resolution, which was adopted by only one (sic) vote in a meeting attended by only a small part of the membership, is presented to 2the public as the will of the majority of all our members and as an action approved by a real majority of the Verein, we, the undersigned members of the Chicago Arbeiterverein, deem it to be our patriotic duty to declare that we, as liberal Republicans and unconditional Union men, strongly disapprove of appointing delegates to attend the Cleveland Convention; that we consider the entire movement, which was started by so-called liberals, to hold a separate convention as dangerous and detrimental to the cause of the Union; that we will give all our support to the nominee of the Baltimore Convention, whether he be Lincoln, or Freemont, or Butler, or any other able man who is worthy of the nomination; that we will not approve of or support any movement, no matter who starts it or in whose favor it is conducted, if it splits the Union party, and thus weakens that party and furthers the cause of the Secession party.

    Chicago, May 19, 1864.

    C. Mechelke,

    F. Koepke,

    C. Krueger,

    [and ninety-eight others]

    The meeting of the Chicago Arbeiterverein held on the seventeenth of May, 1864 was attended by only a relatively small number of members. By a vote of thirty-seven to thirty-five ...

    German
    III B 1, III B 2, I G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 30, 1866
    Of Chicago Arbeiterverein

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866.

    To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for the purpose of bringing about an understanding with your honorable Board, in regard to certain issues, and we beg permission to present the following matters:

    Through the newspapers and other sources of information we have learned that the members of two other societies, or associations, have been informed that they must discontinue their recreational activities on Sunday evenings. Of course, the Arbeiterverein has nothing to do with the recreation of other organizations, nor do we wish to express our opinions concerning the motives for the Board's action against these societies. However, during the past few weeks, one of these periodic religious movements, generally called "revivals," 2has been in process, and the Chicago Arbeiterverein, always intent upon avoiding any offense against citizen who differ with our religious opinions, takes the view that during the past eight years (the past four under police protection) these "revivals," usually held on Sunday evenings, have taken the form of a kind of social entertainment (sic). Therefore, we ask: Does the above mentioned notice also apply to our organization?

    We are aware that you have the right to answer: Wait until you receive notice; but, as loyal citizens, we would not like to offend against any law, nor would we like to suffer the consequences of not knowing the law, nor do we want our members to be taken by surprise by a policeman and disturbed in their innocent and harmless amusements which are in complete accord with the religious liberty guar-anteed by the Constitution, nor do we need an excuse to be provided to make us responsible for an offense against any state law that is in agreement with the spirit of the Constitution,

    Should our social entertainments be prohibited by order of your Board, we would respectfully point cut that in 1861 the Board of Police Commissioners entered 3into the following pact with the president of our society:

    1. The President will be responsible for the maintenance of order, and the police shall not interfere with our social entertainment;

    2. No brass musical instruments shall be used at such entertainments, out of respect for the religious convictions of our fellow citizens, and one or more violins, but only one flute, bass violin, or piano shall be used.

    3. The police will not consider these entertainments to be "illegal," as long as the concerts and dances do not disturb the neighborhood.

    The Arbeiterverein has strictly observed these conditions despite contradictions by a newspaper, the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, two part owners of which were expelled from the organization on account of their loud, mischievous conduct; they even went so far as to break up one of our public meetings and to slander everybody who did not agree with their arrogant opinions.

    We trust that your honorable Board will pay no attention to the malicious 4utterances which these "snakes" publish against our society. Had they conducted themselves in an orderly manner, they would still be members of our society.

    We do not advertise our entertainments, nor do we invite strangers to participate in them. We have a Committee on Order and a Committee of Ushers who admit only members or strangers who are accompanied or invited by members, and the members must give their word of honor that they can vouch for and will be responsible for the behavior of these strangers.

    The money which is realized through our entertainments is the property of the organization and is used for defraying the expenses incurred by maintaining our library and reading room, and for the support of sick members or their dependent widows and orphans.

    [Translator's note: The next (final) paragraph of this article has evidently 5been "removed" by rats or mice, so it is not possible to offer a translation.]

    We hope most sincerely that you will permit the Arbeiterverein to continue its Sunday evening entertainments under the conditions which were previously agreed upon.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Degenhardt,

    C. Haussner,

    T. Hielscher,

    Ed. Schlaeger.

    Chicago, Illinois, March 21, 1866. To the Honorable Board of police Commissioners of the city of Chicago: The Chicago Arbeiterverein has elected the undersigned to act as a committee for ...

    German
    I B 2, II B 2 a, II D 10, III B 2
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 06, 1866
    Gymnastics in Public Schools

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of all public high schools, and that teachers be engaged to instruct the children in that branch of physical education. The proposal was unanimously adopted, and the Executive Board was instructed to take all necessary measures.

    In the meeting which the School Board held last evening, Inspector Brentano read a proposal of the Chicago Turn Gemeinde, requesting that gymnastics be included in the regular schedule of ...

    German
    III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 3
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- June 07, 1867
    The Chicago Arbeiterverein and the Illinois Staats-Zeitung (Editorial)

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein which was controlled for some time by several political intriguers who proved their claim to the title "worker" by nor working, and which was used to carry on a purposeless war against the Illinois Staats-Zeitung, seems to have freed itself from the pernicious influences of those scoundrels. One of them, who gave his occupation as that of a "luncher," and whose financial records are being investigated by a United States Assessor, has been expelled by the organization, and several others are avoiding a similar fate by keeping discreetly in the background. The real workers represented in the Arbeiterverein have declared their independence of those political schemers who used the society to their own advantage and thwarted all endeavors in behalf of the real workers. The latter group sent us the following letter:

    2

    Chicago, Illinois, June 4, 1867.

    To the Honorable Editor of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung,

    Dear Mr. Brentano: In the absence of our corresponding secretary I take great pleasure in informing you that the Chicago Arbeiterverein in its last meeting adopted the following resolution proposed by Mr. Sievers:

    1. That the resolution to withdraw our advertisements from the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and to remove the copies of that publication from our reading room is hereby revoked.

    2. That it is hereby resolved that the Chicago Arbeiterverein renew its subscription for the Illinois Staats-Zeitung and publish the news of the society in that newspaper.

    In conclusion I express my fervent wish that our future relations will be 3strengthened by mutual consideration.

    Very respectfully,

    C. Schaedel, Secretary protem.

    It is evident that all obstacles to future publication of the activities of the Chicago Arbeiterverein have been removed by the revocation of the above-mentioned resolution, for which there was not the least cause; and we are in hearty accord with the desire expressed by the secretary of the organization in the closing sentence of his letter.

    The Chicago Arbeiterverein which was controlled for some time by several political intriguers who proved their claim to the title "worker" by nor working, and which was used to carry ...

    German
    III B 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- August 07, 1867
    Anti-Temperance Meeting

    The delegates of several German societies met at Workingmen's Hall, on Madison Street, last evening, to discuss a proposed anti -temperance meeting.

    Six societies were represented by delegates, namely: the Chicago Arbeiterverein (Chicago Workingmen's Association), the Socialer Arbeiterverein, the Chicago Turngemeinde, the Aurora Turnverein, the Turnverein Vorwaerts, and the Chicago Union Turnverein.

    The Rink on Wabash Avenue was recommended as a suitable place for the meeting.

    The following committees were appointed:

    Committee to select time and place of meeting: Mr. Lobstein, Mr. Hertwig, and Mr. Von Langen.

    2

    Speakers' committee: Mr. Sievers, Mr. Hand, and Mr. von Langen.

    Committee on resolutions: Mr. Gottfried, Mr. Hertwig. Mr. Bartels, Mr. Behrend, Mr. Standau, Mr. Stoecken, and Mr. von Langen.

    Committee on organization: Mr. Erbe, Mr. Saehn, Mr. Hertwing, Mr. Hand, and Mr. von Langen.

    It was decided to meet again next Sunday at 2 P. M. at the same place. The meeting was then adjourned.

    The delegates of several German societies met at Workingmen's Hall, on Madison Street, last evening, to discuss a proposed anti -temperance meeting. Six societies were represented by delegates, namely: the ...

    German
    I B 1, III B 2