The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 14, 1861
    Semiannual Report of the German Society of Chicago

    Report Dated October 1, 1861, Submitted by F. Schlund, Agent

    Employment secured for 1037
    Reduced fares for poor 10
    Passes for poor immigrants 22
    Lodgings for homeless 7
    Located friends or relatives for 130
    Kept from straying 37
    Assisted in money or check matters 68
    Families lodged 17
    Medical aid or medicine furnished for 16
    Assisted with correspondence 301
    Loans 5
    Located baggage for 35
    Forwarded baggage to destination for 52
    Furnished groceries for 20
    Total 1757

    Report Dated October 1, 1861, Submitted by F. Schlund, Agent <table> <tr> <td>Employment secured for</td> <td>1037</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Reduced fares for poor</td> <td>10</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Passes for poor immigrants</td> <td>22</td> ...

    German
    II D 10, II D 8, II D 6, II D 3, III G
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- May 02, 1871
    [The German House]

    The shareholders of the German House met yesterday under the chairmanship of President Schmutz. The secretary, Mr. Henry Marwedel, read his annual report. He spoke first of the great hopes that the construction of the German House had aroused fifteen years ago and that, unfortunately, due to the general lack of interest were not realized. The number of shareholders quickly melted away. However, enough remained to keep the German House out of the grip of the sheriff. The original grant of $25,000 was made only very hesitatingly and soon proved insufficient. (The actual cost proved to be $36,202). The shareholders voted no additional money, leaving the task of seeing it through to Mr. W. Schmutz and H. Lamperter who had pledged their own property. Due to that fact the building was completed. It is now an adornment of the North Side even though not all its shops are rented very profitably to the shareholders. There is no theater. The rents have brought more, already, during the first winter than the theater would have returned, and there is no danger of temporary loss of rent and no necessity of paying three or four percent more for fire insurance for a theater.

    The fact that the German House was able to make debts to the amount of $30,000 at least proves that it has credit to that amount. Besides, the outlook is 2excellent. Already the Sharpshooters' Association and the Germania Male Choir, very pleasant and respectable tenants, had asked for contracts for several years for their locals. That, however, will be up to the next administrative council to decide.

    After the report was accepted the election of the new council was undertaken. The following gentlemen were elected: Schmutz, Lamperter, Bosse, Heide, Wunderle, Kafer, Huck, Schaub, Brachvogel, Waldhauser, Kruger, Marwedel, and Jensch.

    The rooms in the German House, with the exception of one 31 x 110 ft. shop, are all rented. Since then, $4,232 have come in.

    The shareholders of the German House met yesterday under the chairmanship of President Schmutz. The secretary, Mr. Henry Marwedel, read his annual report. He spoke first of the great hopes ...

    German
    II D 6, III A
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 04, 1877
    (No headline)

    The German Young Men's Christian Association met last night in Room No. 13 Farwell Hall building, Mr. M. J. Gut in the chair and W. Niestadt, Secretary. The principal business of the evening was the hearing of reports of committees appointed at a previous meeting. One committee, to whom had been referred the matter of a concert to add to the financial strength of the Association, reported in favor of giving the concert in the third Tuesday in June in Lower Farwell Hall. The report was adopted, and the price of admission fixed at twenty-five cents. Another committee reported in favor of the publishing of a paper to be called the Bundesposaune, to be issued semi-monthly and devoted to the interest of Christianity in general and the German Y.M. C. A. in particular. Mr. F. W. Martine is to be placed in the position of editor-in-chief, and the first issue will be out in all probability, in the early part of June. A great deal of discussion preceded and followed the adoption of the reports of the committees.

    The German Young Men's Christian Association met last night in Room No. 13 Farwell Hall building, Mr. M. J. Gut in the chair and W. Niestadt, Secretary. The principal business ...

    German
    II D 6
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- March 12, 1890
    The German Young Men's Christian Association.

    The German Young Men's Christian Association arranged a lecture for its Club, yesterday, at the northwest corner of Clark and Wells Streets. Many friends of the Association, besides its sixty-seven members were present. Several choral selections were sung under the leadership of Chas. Weiss, organist of St. Paul's Church. At the conclusion of the musical activities, C. Gilbert Wheeler, Professor of Analytical Chemistry, and an instructor of long standing at Chicago University, was introduced to the assembly. His subject was a highly interesting and explicit dissertation, whereby he showed that the creation of the earth had been based on chemical principles, and that the many strange phenomena of nature are caused by a change of the particles which constitute matter. These molecular wonders he demonstrated, in a fascinating manner, by enabling us to see more than twenty experiments. A quartette gave several vocal selections, thereby contributing to the general enjoyment. Since this Association, which was founded only recently, (last summer) gives its entertainments in the German language and manner, Prof. Wheeler acquiesced by giving his intellectual lecture in the German language, which must have been both gratifying and surprising to his German audience. Prof. Wheeler has spoken 2German since his youth, and has had occasion to study it thoroughly during his official appointment as American Consul at Nurnberg, Germany.

    The German Young Men's Christian Association arranged a lecture for its Club, yesterday, at the northwest corner of Clark and Wells Streets. Many friends of the Association, besides its sixty-seven ...

    German
    II D 6, I C, II B 2 g, III H
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- September 18, 1893
    Dedication of New South Side State Street Turnhall The South Side Turnverein and Singing Club Frohsinn Take Possession

    A splendid celebration marked the opening of the Turnhall yesterday. It will be the mutual home of the South Side Turngemeinde and the singing club Frohsinn. The entire membership of both associations turned out and marched from their former quarters, Freiberg's Hall on 22nd St., to their new location with streaming flags and gay music..... Sunny hallways provided ample room for the hundreds who sought admittance to the auditorium while Weber's"Jubilee Overture" was being played. The orchestra consisted of the best musicians of the Thomas Philharmonic Association, and was conducted by Mr. G. Katzenberger..... At the conclusion of the music, Mr. R. Baum then handed over the keys of the building to D. Mueller, president of the club Frohsinn, and to C. Hammesfahr, first speaker of the South Side Turn Club. Mr. B. Baum, the architect who supervised the erection of the building was detained by illness, and therefore the 2ceremonial presentation was made to him by proxy, his son taking his place. The women of Katzenberger's Chorus and the members of Frohsinn sang from Wagner's famous "Tannhaeuser," "How Gladly We Greet the Hall." Accompanied by the orchestra, it was most impressive.

    The difficulties encountered by the South Side Turngemeinde in its quest for a suitable location which would enable future expansion, were well described by Mr. T. Oehne in his festival address, which he gave in German. He said:... "It was in Dec., 1885, nearly eight years ago, when twelve men collaborated to organize a Turnverein on the South Side; a venture which had been repeatedly unsuccessful. But our undaunted men could not be discouraged nor dissuaded. Within a few months on February 22, 1886, when the First founders' festival was held, the club had already shown signs of success. Within a short time, two hundred members had enrolled..." He emphasized the power derived from unity.... At this time Mayor Harrison arrived at the meeting, but because he was rather breathless his speech was delayed for a time. In the meantime, 3Mrs. Anna Katzenberger sang the aria "Thee, Beloved Hall" from Wagner's "Tannhaeuser," which received much applause.....

    Mayor Harrison was then introduced as the next speaker. When he mentioned the great number of Germans residing in this city, almost half a million, he could not restrain himself from feeding the audience some political honey..... All of them being potential voters.....

    The building, located at 3143-47 State St., is three stories high; the ground floor is rather high and the facade is very ornamental. A beautiful frieze and balconies and gables give it a very impressive exterior.... The main entrance is twenty-five feet wide..... Reliefs show the busts of Beethoven and Mozart, while at the center gable the head of Father John, founder of the German gymnastic movement, has been reproduced.

    The theater is seventy-five by one hundred and twenty-five feet; the stage runs along the entire east wall, and is probably the largest stage of any 4of our present halls..... The gallery provides considerable additional space. It is dignified and well-proportioned..... May it be very successful in the future.

    A splendid celebration marked the opening of the Turnhall yesterday. It will be the mutual home of the South Side Turngemeinde and the singing club Frohsinn. The entire membership of ...

    German
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, II B 3, II D 6, II F, IV
  • Abendpost -- August 06, 1894
    The New Home of the German Group of the Y. M. C. A.

    The plan for the building of the new house for the German Group of the Y. M.C. A. is being made by Architect Louis Guenzel. The building will have its place on the Northside and will contain:-

    On the first floor- Reception room, office, assembly-room, swimming pool and garde-robes.

    On the Second floor- Concert-Hall with stage, meeting hall and gymnasium.

    On the Third floor- Library, deskrooms and guest-rooms.

    On the Fourth floor- Hotel rooms

    On the Fifth floor- Hotel rooms

    The secretary of the German Group, Mr. G. Horrlocher, isalways willing to give any information in regards to the financing of the new building.

    The plan for the building of the new house for the German Group of the Y. M.C. A. is being made by Architect Louis Guenzel. The building will have its ...

    German
    II D 6
  • Abendpost -- September 26, 1910
    The German House.

    The number of Germans on the Northwest side of the city is estimated at 100,000. The majority of them have settled there during the last 10-15 years. Already there are over one hundred clubs and societies and a number of halls where they meet; but there is completely lacking a centrally located larger hall for amusements and entertainments.

    To build a large "German House" is being under consideration. This is to serve as a home for as many as possible, if not for all, of the German clubs and societies on the Northwest side.

    The Northwest Athletic Club, whose hall had been previously destroyed by fire, invited all German societies and lodges to discuss this matter, and not less than 24 of them took part...

    According to their plan a joint-stock company is to be established, which will consist of the clubs and individual members. The total cost of the building is estimated at $100,000.00. The building is to be furnished in modern style. It will 2contain one large dance and assembly hall, and a number of smaller halls for lodges and societies, clubrooms, billiard rooms, bowling alleys, gymnasium, bathing halls, etc. A large garden joining the building to be used for festivals and recreation is being considered also....

    The greater the beauty and practicality of the clubhouse, and garden, the greater will be the attraction and the attendance. No doubt, such an enterprise will receive the best cooperation of the German population on the Northwest side.

    The number of Germans on the Northwest side of the city is estimated at 100,000. The majority of them have settled there during the last 10-15 years. Already there are ...

    German
    III B 2, II D 6, III A, II F
  • Abendpost -- October 23, 1929
    Schubert House New Building for Public Meetings, Opening Celebration October 26

    A new building has made its appearance on North Halsted Street. Its owner intends to provide a modern hall building suitable for diverse festivities for the Germans of the near Northside. In memory of the immortal composer, Schubert, it shall be known as the "Schubert House." On Saturday, October 26, at eight o'clock, the formal opening will be proclaimed amid suitable festivities. Location: 1923-1925 Halsted Street.

    Otto Schoeppel is the founder. He has been successful in providing and exceptionally diversified program for the coming celebration. Doctor J. W. Kobalter, president of the Alliance of German-Austro-Hungarian clubs of North America, will be master of ceremonies. At the very opening, the motto shall prevail that it is dedicated as a happy home, where songs and music of our homeland are honored, and youth in particular can find a beautiful hall for pleasure.

    2

    Various speakers will be there: The General Austrian Consul, M. Girten; Alderman Arthur F. Albert; Leopold Saltiel, the attorney,.... and finally the founder of the building, Otto Schoeppel.

    Colorful diversity is assured, choral singing, solo parts, and humorists who are prone to promote a jovial entertainment. The entire assembly will be requested to join in a medley of songs. Merriment is the keynote, and everybody is cordially invited to the house warming party.

    A new building has made its appearance on North Halsted Street. Its owner intends to provide a modern hall building suitable for diverse festivities for the Germans of the near ...

    German
    II D 6, IV
  • Abendpost -- May 05, 1932
    Mrs. Louise Keitel Died at a Fine Old Age

    The number of the old settlers of Chicago who, so to speak, have known the city already in the days of their childhood, decreases steadily because, among them, death takes its main harvest.

    Mrs. Louise Keitel who, together with her husband, also now passed into eternity, emigrated from Germany and came to America in 1870.

    Mrs. Keitel was born in Berlin, Germany, in 1840. Her husband, who is former decades, was well known and hightly esteemed as a building contractor, had come to Chicago in 1869, and established a new existence for himself. The happy marriage was blessed with four children, of whom three are still living.

    Mrs. Keitel was a most active member of the Evangelic Luteran St. Paul's Church and the creator of a fund with which later the St. Paul's House was build and maintained.

    The three daughters, Mrs. William Feldmann, Mrs. Ewald Weber, and Mrs. H. G. 2Zander, wife of the well known real estate man, mourn the passing of their aged mother. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at Graceland Cemetery,

    The number of the old settlers of Chicago who, so to speak, have known the city already in the days of their childhood, decreases steadily because, among them, death takes ...

    German
    IV, II D 6
  • Atlantis -- [Unknown date]
    A Trip to Wisconsin

    In America we are indifferent about the future, although it is the "Land of the Future." Likewise, Chicago does not consider the possibility of commercial catastrophes, which have afflicted and affected all of our commercial cities. The speculators,-and who is not a schemer in Chicago? -fear no business crisis; they act and conduct their affairs as if the city were twice as large. If Chicago has a future,-and we have no doubts of it whatsoever,-then it appears that it is being anticipated. After all, Chicago's geographical and commercial conditions are very auspicious. In the end it will exceed the hopes of the most sanguine.

    We saw many splendid buildings, but the German House, in particular, attracted our attention. Situated on the North Side, near she business district, centrally located, its position provides equal accessibility to the inhabitants of the North, West, and South sections of the city.

    2

    The hall was built by Germans with funds obtained through a bond issue. The building forms the focal point of all German endeavors; associations, meetings, etc. We consider this an excellent proposition and predict most gratifying results, especially so because the structure is not the property of any specific club or lodge, being dedicated to the entire German population, which presumably precludes a repetition of the fate that engulfs our German Free-Masonic halls in Cincinnati, St. Louis, etc. The German element will gain considerably thereby, as the work is conducive to create a certain permanence, and that in turn builds power. We feel certain that the might thus obtained will not be wasted in the furtherance of reactionary politics and corrupt office seekers, because Chicago's Germans, in the main, are liberal-minded, consisting of young, ceaselessly ambitious individuals, while the few grey-beards have no influence. The latter, therefore, must stay inactively on the sidelines. German initiative is capable of anything; it requires only a 3proper start. A plastic, formative material is available, and the sculptor's expert touch need only add the requisite precious image.

    This phase is the problem of the only German newspaper of the city, The Illinois Staats-Zeitung. How the publication prospers becomes most apparent when one considers that it is the only German daily in Illinois and Chicago, where we have nearly 30,000 Germans. But the political and social significance of the paper vastly exceeds its material basis. After all, the Germans of Chicago are almost unaffected by preconceived opinions and party preferences, being comparable to a blank leaf which is suitable for any test. We hardly know of any other German publication in the United States which may proceed so individualistically and independently as this newspaper, which need not follow the dictates of popular opinion but is in a position to hold it. The German public here is inclined to accept the best, yet appears satisfied with the common offerings.

    4

    The Illinois Staats-Zeitung attained considerable recognition in its responsible task, and in our judgment its leaders will continue on the straight political path. Some deviations, such as supporting the election of Chase, are temporary; and the paper soon reverted to a decided anti-slavery program. The Illinois Staats-Zeitung reflects the opinion of the great American majority of Chicago who regarded Douglas's Nebraska speech of last year as worthy of a Benedict Arnold. The Germans acquiesce, although they are more interested in business than in politics. Obviously, the demand for a good, regularly appearing slave-driver publication is not very great in Chicago, and if the politicians organize one, it may prove detrimental to their party.

    When we arrived in Chicago, Hillgaertner had departed for Iowa to follow his former legal vocation. He had been editor of the Staats-5Zeitung for three years and his liberal views, above all, brought prosperity to the paper. We cannot refrain from taking advantage of this opportunity to pay him our profound respects. A man like Hillgaertner should not leave the battlefield during its present dreary aspect; we hope to see him again doing effective work among the people. Even if American politics with its crass contradictions and questionable methods do not fascinate a friendly soul, one feels nevertheless that the hour approaches when men in Europe will combine to proclaim justice, extol liberty, and then Hillgaertner will not be absent.

    Among the English newspapers, the Chicago Tribune now shows the same tendency as the Staats-Zeitung. Only six months ago the Tribune was a violent temperance and know-nothing organ [Knownothing, a political party opposed to anything which was not of English or Irish origin.6Transl.], fundamentally opposed to the Staats-Zeitung as well as the entire German population.

    In America we are indifferent about the future, although it is the "Land of the Future." Likewise, Chicago does not consider the possibility of commercial catastrophes, which have afflicted and ...

    German
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II D 6, III C